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A crunchy treat
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
on a rigid steel hardtail?

I'm thinking of getting a rigid steel (SS) hardtail to get back to basics with riding. I'm just a bit worried that it won't be able to handle my local trails, with their jumps and roots and rocks.

I want an On-One Inbred (26") with their carbon fork, I just need to know what type of stuff other people can ride without snapping the fork! I'm only light (160lbs) so I'm not really going to be stressing things too much, but still.

Also: what tooth counts should I run for general up, down and across trails?

Thanks all.
 

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local trails rider
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I don't know about jumps, but I've seen a few guys ride this stretch on rigid 29ers:



(one guy was on a carbon forked Inbred, one on a carbon forked Salsa (Selma?), one... I think it was an all steel Karate Monkey.

Gearing definitely depends on you and your trails. Can you experiment on a geared bike, to see what is doable?
 

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FoShizzle said:
i wouldnt use a hardtail for other than commuting
So you use those obnoxious heavy pedals on that hardtail of yours for commuting? You are one rich SOB.

To the OP, try out, post results.
 

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Bicycle wheel Bicycle frame Mountain bike Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Recreation
Local path perfectly suited for a ridged bike, which also goes for the path in perttime's 1st pic.
HT'll get you there, just a lil' bumpier.
 

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Weather you can ride a ridged on your trails depends compleatly on you. Your lines and speed will be different with a ridged, this could could give you major trail cred. It could also make you so lame your buddies wont call you to ride. I got a ridged and ride it on my own, or when I'm doing an easy group ride. I find the bike a blast.
 

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Chips n Beer said:
Weather you can ride a ridged on your trails depends compleatly on you.
He could also try a ribbed one, in addition to ridged, same thing, just less crinkly. Glow in the dark option is also rad.
 

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Yeah, you can ride a rigid anywhere you want. It might not be as much fun as you expect, or it might be more fun. I agree with the poster above that rigid is for commuting, not trails (been there and done that in the 80s), but that's me.
 

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I have ridden a rigid steel bike on very rough trails, plenty of roots, rocks, drops, jump, etc. It's definitely doable, but as mentioned above, if the trail is really rough you're not going to go as fast as you would on a bike with suspension, and you're certainly not going to go as big (unless you are some kind of riding monster).

Although I have no direct carbon fiber experience, I would think a good carbon fork could handle the roots and rocks just fine, and probably the drops, as well (if rolled). However, I would be wary about getting that fork too high off the ground unless the landing zone is nice and smooth. A rough landing on a carbon fork would just freak me out too much!
 

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A crunchy treat
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm liking this, my locals probably don't get rougher than what's been posted, apart from obstacles, roots, rocks drops etc, and I already ride a HT Transition Vagrant so I won't be missing the rear travel. Guess I'll have to try it and see. :cool:
 

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it's....
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Curmy said:
He could also try a ribbed one, in addition to ridged, same thing, just less crinkly. Glow in the dark option is also rad.
And it depends on the weather, according to Chip n beer.
 

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Main difference with a rigid is that you'll find you've had enough after riding less distance. It is up to you to work out whether that means you'll have less fun from the intense buzz for short periods vs. the more detached feeling from suspension and running for longer.
 

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Bicyclochondriac.
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Carrot said:
I want an On-One Inbred (26") with their carbon fork, I just need to know what type of stuff other people can ride without snapping the fork! I'm only light (160lbs) so I'm not really going to be stressing things too much, but still.
.
I think you are going to be the limiting factor rather than the bike in terms of how rough a trail you can handle.
 

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Riding rigid means learning to ride. Staying loose and fast while keeping control of the bike. If you are going HT I can't really advise. My limited experiences on a HT were disappointing at best. Rigid or FS is the way to go - keeps things balanced.

That said, FS is best if you are after speed and flow. For slow technical riding I actually prefer a rigid bike as it is more predictable (center of gravity isn't shifting about constantly) and doesn't soak up your control input.

Go as big as you like on either one, just ride within your ability.
 

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You could also look at a long travel hardtail frame like a Cove Handjob - the later models will comfortably accept a 130mm travel fork. A surprisingly good ride - especially on the climbs. If you stay off the saddle on downhills and let the bike 'float' about underneath you, I think you'd be surprised at how good a ride this can be.
 

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A crunchy treat
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I've already got a Transition Vagrant with Fox 36, so I don't want another hardtail.

I can't afford to spend a great deal on a new bike, so it's either a rigid On-One or a Specialized Pitch (or equiv). If I got a full sus, then my Vagrant would go unridden, which I couldn't have cos it's an absolute blast, so I thought I'd get a rigid bike to re-learn the basics and advance my riding skills.
 

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Bicyclochondriac.
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Carrot said:
I've already got a Transition Vagrant with Fox 36, so I don't want another hardtail.

I can't afford to spend a great deal on a new bike, so it's either a rigid On-One or a Specialized Pitch (or equiv). If I got a full sus, then my Vagrant would go unridden, which I couldn't have cos it's an absolute blast, so I thought I'd get a rigid bike to re-learn the basics and advance my riding skills.
If you are on a budget, why not go with a steel fork?
 
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