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aka Taprider
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How accurate is http://analyticcycling.com/ForcesLessWeight_Page.html ?

Shave off 1 kg and only save 1.76 seconds on a 2km climb?

What assumptions are made for the calculations? are they valid? how do they compare to real world data?

It is interesting when using coefficient of rolling resistance (equivalent to roughness of terrain). So I add 1 kg for plush coil suspension that that might make a rough rocky climb feel more like concrete and I might save a 1/2 second up the climb
 

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For weight on a climb it's quite accurate as long as the assumptions you use for road surface, etc. are accurate. But with weight reduction from your body rather than bike it will underestimate the benefit since it can't account for the metabolic gains from not having to keep that blubber alive.
 

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Yes, its accurate if you don't mess it up.

ccm said:
How accurate is http://analyticcycling.com/ForcesLessWeight_Page.html ?

Shave off 1 kg and only save 1.76 seconds on a 2km climb?

What assumptions are made for the calculations? are they valid? how do they compare to real world data?

It is interesting when using coefficient of rolling resistance (equivalent to roughness of terrain). So I add 1 kg for plush coil suspension that that might make a rough rocky climb feel more like concrete and I might save a 1/2 second up the climb
They are valid unless you screw up the imputs....
BTW, you didn't mention the elevation change in your 2km example. Elevation means everything when using that calculator.
I use one climb example of 1.4 miles with about 580 feet of gain.
I also up the rolling resistance by using .012 instead of the suggested .008 being the roughest. Your use of adding an extra kg seems to just be messing up the formula.
Anyway, for my climb 2.5 pounds equals 8.4 seconds on the climb. To me, that is quite substantial.
But remember, you'll probably gain more than that by using a tire with superior rolling resistance. Almost always the tire will give you more time saved than the weight you lose with lighter parts. Ideally you would use both.

So yes, the test is accurate, but it is a "relative" test, meaning it will give you those results....."all other factors being equal". So don't mess it up by substituting different forks etc.
 
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