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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm not going to buy a torch etc and learn to braze for the sake of a few hose guides, besides it wouldn't work out any cheaper which is the whole point.

Using zipties is ugly.

I guess I'll start looking at epoxy glues and see if I can find one that is a; strong enough, and b; can withstand the baking temps for powdercoating.

In the meantime if anyone wants to take me seriously and knows something that would be useful please post here. Otherwise dont bother.

Cheers.
 

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mikesnowdon said:
use to glue hose guides on?
mikesnowdon said:
In the meantime if anyone wants to take me seriously
I see these two things as mutually exclusive. Two good solutions have already been made. Take it to have them brazed on by anyone with a torch or use zip ties. Gradeschool arts and crafts solutions are going to look far worse than zip ties.
 

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Randomhead
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Not really fair to get all huffy about this, you could do your own research since nobody here would even consider doing such a thing in the first place. And it seems to me that would be obvious if you had spent even the first ounce of effort thinking about what you wanted. Pity you have to pay someone a fair price for their investment, time, and ability to have it done the right way.

And to take your original question seriously, the fittings don't generally don't have enough surface area, and "super-strong" high-temp adhesives aren't cheap if they even exist. You might be able to braze them cheaply if you can get a mapp torch and a short piece of flux covered silver. Except you'd have to know how to braze first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It was just a thought. If there is a glue strong enough hen why not? some would say is not the 'proper' way to do it but those same people probably think bonded carbon frames aren't 'proper' either.

I mean no disrespect to frame building, its a fine art. And if I was better off I wouldn't hesitate to have a pro frame builder add some hose guides for me. Unfortunately at the moment I'm looking for ways to save money in these difficult economic times. For that reason I wondered if a strong epoxy of some kind could be a an alternative which would enable me to attach some hose guides myself. assuming thee is such a product that will satisfy the task I see no issues with it once the whole frames been blasted and painted. It'll not look any different.

I may do some glue research and proceed with the idea. If I do I'll let you all know how it goes :)

Thanks for all the help lol!

PS: Im in n way 'huffy' or angry in any way whatsoever.
 

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What temp is the powder coating oven, I'm guessing arond 200 deg C. Even the best high temp epoxys have a glass transition point around 150 C, after that its just luck if they stay on. I can if you want recommend an epoxy that should just about do it but its going to be a lot more than the cost of having it brazed on and you need to bond at 150 C to get the high temp properties.

You could soft solder with a high temp product, there are several lead based solders available with a 300 C melting point. I've done this with a hot air paint srtipper before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Citizen Kane said:
What temp is the powder coating oven, I'm guessing arond 200 deg C. Even the best high temp epoxys have a glass transition point around 150 C, after that its just luck if they stay on. I can if you want recommend an epoxy that should just about do it but its going to be a lot more than the cost of having it brazed on and you need to bond at 150 C to get the high temp properties.

You could soft solder with a high temp product, there are several lead based solders available with a 300 C melting point. I've done this with a hot air paint srtipper before.
Thanks for that.

Looks like I'll need to wait until I can afford to have some guides brazed on I think.

Cheers all! :)
 

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no dabs
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I've used stick on hose guides on top of powdercoat before. I had one come off, but it was quick, easy, and cheap to replace. The replacement has stayed put for at least 3 years.

If the frame is aluminum, you can use rivet on hose guides before powdercoating. I have some, but I'm not sure where I got them (probably Nova). I also have some stops that, based on their design, would be pretty easy to modify into hose guides.

if this is an existing frame with cable stops, there are some problem solvers, alligator, etc adapters. Some work really well and look ok (others don't). The ones that pinch the hose between the adapter and the frame look the best, and work ok as long as you don't need to stop the hose from sliding along the frame. I have a bunch of those, and one of them kept sliding. I fixed it with a zip tie about 2000 miles ago. I don't notice the ugly :D
 

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Framebuilder
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mikesnowdon said:
It was just a thought. If there is a glue strong enough hen why not? some would say is not the 'proper' way to do it but those same people probably think bonded carbon frames aren't 'proper' either.

I mean no disrespect to frame building, its a fine art. And if I was better off I wouldn't hesitate to have a pro frame builder add some hose guides for me. Unfortunately at the moment I'm looking for ways to save money in these difficult economic times. For that reason I wondered if a strong epoxy of some kind could be a an alternative which would enable me to attach some hose guides myself. assuming thee is such a product that will satisfy the task I see no issues with it once the whole frames been blasted and painted. It'll not look any different.

I may do some glue research and proceed with the idea. If I do I'll let you all know how it goes :)

Thanks for all the help lol!

PS: Im in n way 'huffy' or angry in any way whatsoever.
But joints in a bonded carbon frame have a lot more surface area than a cable guide does.

I think if there was a strong glue that would make installing braze ons easier/faster/cheaper, you'd see every mass produced bike done that way.

Judging by the framebuilders lists/forums, there seems to be quite a few hobby builders in the UK, maybe you could look up one of those guys?
 

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mikesnowdon said:
Thanks for that.

Looks like I'll need to wait until I can afford to have some guides brazed on I think.

Cheers all! :)
Um, if some one brought me a frame devoid of parts, paint and clean I would do it for maybe 30 bucks? Doode, if that is too much bread better hit the streets for some work:rolleyes:

DP 420 might work, cost you a lot more than that.

Personal peeve. Way off topic. I have begun turning away these kind of jobs because some of you may not believe how disgusting some of these bikes guys try and bring me. I tell them to remove parts, get it clean but inevitably I get something completely built and covered in scuzz, sports drink, sweat, spit and mud. I almost feel like I could get a damn infection from touching some of these peoples sh-t.:madman:
 
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