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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First let me say that I am in the "re-entry" phase of my mountian biking experience and this site has been a HUGE help and resource. Thanks for making this a great place to spend my lunch-hour.

Here's my first contribution to the mtbr knowledge pool...

I needed a workstand. Having been a bike mechanic for many years (long ago), I wanted somthing that works as well as the old park professional deals. Being short on the cash I opted to make my very own. I give you the "Mark" (that would be my first name, which just happens to ryme with Park) Workstand.

I'd be glad to post more pictures, advice and all that if you all are interested.

Oh... Yes it works great! The clamp (angle iron coated in plastidip) holds with are much clamping force as you dare use. The angle and height are all fully adjustable via allen wrench. I'm considering the Mark Workstand rev 1 a success.

Hope I can inspire other riders to homebrew-bike-stand-greatness.

Did I mention the whole shoot'in match cost me less than $25.

-Mark
 

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That sure as heck beats my improvised workstands of years past.

One was hanging the bike by a rope from a ladder that was attached to the ceiling of the garage. Sketchy, and not exactly stable.

I also had some upside-down milk crate creation that just barely lifted the rear wheel off the ground.

You've got quite a combination going there, something I don't recall seeing previously. And a possible MTBR first, it doesn't contain any PVC!!! Congratulations! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks...

Speedub.Nate said:
You've got quite a combination going there, something I don't recall seeing previously. And a possible MTBR first, it doesn't contain any PVC!!! Congratulations! :D
Hey thanks!

I've been really pleased with the way the thing works. The clamp is every bit as good as any park pro stand I've ever used. The angle adjustment works ok but I think I'll be improving upon it at some point.

It's pretty much just a pair of 10" vicegrips hacked up and welded to 1"x1/4" angle iron and some 3/4" black pipe. Don't know if there's a market but I've thought about throwing a few on ebay.

You guys who said you want more information... Tell me what you want to know and I'll provide the info. Be specific.

-mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yup... I saw that too.

Hanzo90802 said:
I just dont know what those black things that are holding the seatpost is. Any guesses?
I checked those out before a built mine. It's just a pipe clamp this some plastic (or maybe rubberish stuff) v-blocks that the guy made and bolted to the clamp. I didn't like the idea because it lacked the ability to easily change the angle at which the bike hangs. The angle on his in dependent on how tight you turn the clamp onto the pipe and how tight you turn the pipe into the flange. Having a fast, reliable and strong cam-lock vice was also a MAJOR priority.

My 2 pennys...

-Mark
 

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Backinthegame said:
I checked those out before a built mine. It's just a pipe clamp this some plastic (or maybe rubberish stuff) v-blocks that the guy made and bolted to the clamp. I didn't like the idea because it lacked the ability to easily change the angle at which the bike hangs. The angle on his in dependent on how tight you turn the clamp onto the pipe and how tight you turn the pipe into the flange. Having a fast, reliable and strong cam-lock vice was also a MAJOR priority.

My 2 pennys...

-Mark
I like your idea because you can flip the bike upside down if you need to, but I dont have access to welding equipment. :( Im thinking someone at work does. :confused:
 

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This is a stand I built out of 2x4's (well the clamp at least, the bottom part is easy to come up with)

It worked very well. Was stable and the wood doesn't scratch the frame.

I used it until one day while shopping at Performance Bike, a guy walks up to me and asks if I need a workstand. I was like "huh?". Thought he was an employee trying to sell me something. Turns out the guy was moving and trying to get rid of stuff. He lived 1/2 mi away and gave me this:



Sweet deal!
 

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In my mind, I can do it!
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Hanzo90802 said:
After seeing your idea. I did a search on ebay yesterday and found this one.
I saw this too. I gave me some ideas on making my own but I am stuck trying to figure out what to use for the rubber pieces. The clamp costs about $3.50 at Harbor Freight. I found this online that could be cut in half maybe: http://www.tracysworkshop.com/pc-4790-16833-hi-density-neoprene-block.aspx

Or, maybe some kind of boat trailer bow bumper. I donno. I haven't figured out how to do that part yet. I would definately build it so the clamp on the bar could be rotated though. I would like to know if anyone figures out how to do it.

I also found some stuff called Plasti Dip that could be used to protect the bike from getting scratched by metal pieces. Google it and see what you think.
 

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Backinthegame said:
First let me say that I am in the "re-entry" phase of my mountian biking experience and this site has been a HUGE help and resource. Thanks for making this a great place to spend my lunch-hour.

Here's my first contribution to the mtbr knowledge pool...

I needed a workstand. Having been a bike mechanic for many years (long ago), I wanted somthing that works as well as the old park professional deals. Being short on the cash I opted to make my very own. I give you the "Mark" (that would be my first name, which just happens to ryme with Park) Workstand.

I'd be glad to post more pictures, advice and all that if you all are interested.

Oh... Yes it works great! The clamp (angle iron coated in plastidip) holds with are much clamping force as you dare use. The angle and height are all fully adjustable via allen wrench. I'm considering the Mark Workstand rev 1 a success.

Hope I can inspire other riders to homebrew-bike-stand-greatness.

Did I mention the whole shoot'in match cost me less than $25.

-Mark
Can you show a few more angles on the vice-grips?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
more pix and thoughts on plasti-dip

iviguy said:
Can you show a few more angles on the vice-grips?

Thanks
I'll get more pictures posted per your request. It might not be untill next week sometime. I'm headed for MOAB tomorrow!

Some one mentioned plasti-dip. The red coating on my repairstand (pictured above) is plasti-dip. It's holding up ok but it wants to stick to my seatpost when I open the clamp. I'm currently using a rag between the platci-dip and the bike!

I'd save your $6 on the plasti-dip and cut the cost of your project in half!

-mark
 

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Second the call for more details.

I would like to second the call for more details.

I'm signed up to do a beginners metalwork/welding course and I reckon that this would make a great project to start out with.

Great idea by the way.

Cheers.
 

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This might be more of a writeup than anyone was interested in but architecture school is all about process so I figured I'd share.

Disclaimer: attempt at your own risk, results depend on ones craft and the amount of time they put into it. We have some great facilities to use, a warehouse sized shop with rooms for wood, metal and even a decently equipped machine room, but it could be built by anyone with a little time ( + patience and inginuity), a welder and some cutoff wheels and flap discs for a grinder (or chopsaw).

Materials:
The base is 1/4 inch mild steel I found in my studio from someones old project, it weighs enough but flexes a tiny bit if you really try to move the vertical post. The professional park stands use 1/2" but you could get away with 1/4 or even better would be 3/8. I intended this to be a stationary stand, although I welded the pole to a pipe flange kind of fitting and tapped the base so I could screw the post down with cap screws and attach it to some sort of portable base if I ever choose to do so. The rest was made of various pieces of pipe laying around (chosen based on corresponding I.D/O.D diameters.) Clamp is 1x1 angle.

Hardware:
The knobs all came from rockler which is a retail store which sells woodworking equipment, they are intended to be used to make router jigs and fixtures and are something like .99 each. They also have a catalog you can order them from. The clamping mechanism is a screw from a harbor freight C-clamp and a post it mounts to with a small handle on the back end I fab'd myself. The stand raises and lowers and the clamping mechanism rotates 360 degrees. Right now the clamp is covered with elec. tape but I was planning on using that plasti-dip business talked about in earlier posts.

Process:

I'm a student assistant in the shop so I worked on it when we were'nt busy a couple evenings over a few weeks. Everything is Mig welded out of convenience but if I were to do it again I would have used the arc welder I have at my house to weld the cast Iron to mild steel pieces. Moving parts were wire brushed and sanded with a flap disc and will probably be clear coated. The rest was painted with Rustoleum Hammered which becomes textured as it dries (comes in a pint and brushes on real nice) Still have to clean it up around the clamping mech cause I painted it but the clamp slides more smoothly on a raw surface.

Depending on interest I could be persueded to do some drawings, but I'm a little busy with graduation/finding a place to live during grad school right now.
 

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Cost:
I don't know, really all I paid for was the Harbor Freight C-clamp, plasti-dip, Rustoleum Paint, and a couple knobs so I'm maybe $20 into it. As for the steel, it was alll found or given to me by friends but If one was to buy the steel I would have to think it would be under $100. Granted the plate could be somewhat costly if you must buy it but you could always just mount the flange securely to the floor with bolts, some sort of powder actuated fastener or a tapcon or something depending on the material and you could be sure that it would stable.
 

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