Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 359 Posts

·
on a routine expedition
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
For my own selfish reasons I've been compiling the Highline info from these forums. Since I really want everyone here to like me, I thought I'd share. If you have any info or find something I've missed, please post it up!

turnerbikes said:
These are the last beta bikes before, and I mean just before production. Sapa engineering guys were helping get this out of the proto dept, so that they can expedite the tooling for the soon to follow production run. The plan is to start production within weeks of the show. As someone pointed out, there will certainly be little tweaks to the frame here and there to ready it for full production. Very little will change before they are made.
We will see some of you in Vegas. Only 4 of them will make it to Vegas. Not enough time, for all 8. Sorry, some will have to be patient.

DT
<!-- / message -->
 

Attachments

·
on a routine expedition
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Originally Posted by turnerbikes
Well thanks to opinions some of you shared last fall, here is the free ride frame that we will produce this summer. The image that you see is almost ready for production. It will have 8" of travel with a 15" BB with a 22.5" fork and 27" overall diameter tire, 66 head angle and 72 seat angle. The many testers that rode the ugly assed mule last were all happy with the geometry as listed here, but the chainstay was too long so we trimmed it to 17.25" The BB is a 83mm shell with a 150 x 12mm rear end. The frame will come with an aluminium axle and nut, with the nut acting as deraileur hanger as well. For those using the saint rear derailer it will bolt right on in place of the Turner hanger, with the saint steel axle or the Turner al one. The pivots like the proto will be full needle bearings with seals and grease fittings as you can see in the image.

I spent a lot of time on mass centralization. This is the medium and has 31" standover height measured mid top tube. The tooling has been ordered and tubing is sourced. Just for the record this is a Turner and therefore will be 100% U.S. made. At the rate we are moving it should be shipping before the show. It has been lightened up from the 13lb mule as well. I will not quote a weight untill there is a real frame made to put on the scale, no projected weight BS.

Whata ya think?

David Turner





 

·
on a routine expedition
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
turnerbikes said:
The specs are right on. Any changes in between what you "see" on the site and production will NOT effect geometry. The geometry was tested and approved by more worthy riders than we here in the office.

The rear is certainly the new extreme ride standard, 150 width and can run either saint axle and deraileur (any 12mm hub and therefore rotor mount). Or the production frame will come with an axle and a hanger / nut as you see it in solids. So one can run any deraileur and 12mm hub. The BB is 83mm wide to work with the wider rear end. The reason that the industry is heading that way is for more tire clearance and still have a decent chunk of metal between the tire and the chainrings without making the stays any longer than needed.

--------------------------

Big fork, Fox 40 full length or 888. Plus or minus means plus or minus.

All needle bearings.

DHX coil

E 13 cups will just steepen the HA. On a bike made to land drops don't know why that would be a good idea. It is not supposed to be a race bike. The DHR is, it has longer rear, lower and lighter with no front deraileur and no seat post adjustability and a shorter TT. Racing and extreme riding are diverging sports. Just as freeriding left trail riding in the dust a few years back. Race worthy? compared to what and for whom, that is a question that will be asked 150 times in the next few months. That has me thinkin for sure. I'm sure it will do quite well for some on some hills against some opponents. But against your clone, on a DHR, that is designed for speed, not comfort, not ground clearance for pedalable crank lengths and is designed around a stand up rider spinning those shorter cranks that would just as soon puke than to loose a place. I would bet on the DHR, every run. But I would not think of taking the DHR down the full Porcupine system, my knees would ache thinking about all that pedaling with short cranks and single ring. My back would sieze with the short top tube, and I would have to push instead of use a DRS and click into the granny. Big framing hammer or sledge, pick your weapon.

Same price as DHR this year, $2495 Sorry to bum you out but we ran the math and that is where it fell. I really wanted it to be less, and for the first time in Turner history I worked closely with SAPA in pricing review of each part, but with the amount of billet and machine time etc etc that bad boy is just gonna cost much.
------
 

·
on a routine expedition
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
tscheezy said:
Turner Highline (TNT)- Fox 40RC/Fox DHX Air (8x8"). The frame execution is very impressive. It is burly and to-the-point, and in the raw finish almost industrial looking. Each and every pivot gets a zerk. The main pivot has a zerk in a cool, side-port spot. I got to pedal this one all the way up to the pass at the Caldera Loop, including climbing up sections of the Girl Scout Trail singletrack. The top tube of the size large measured a full 24", but the stem was a pretty diminutive 50mm or so, so the cockpit was pretty short and upright. The weight distribution was not overly rearward as it seems to be on the AS-X, VPFree, and other FR bikes in this class, which helped in climbing noticeably. While not a pleasure to pedal up hills, it was certainly manageable. The Mr Dirt chainguide also came with a single, 36t ring, which added to the challenge, but I was able to muddle through the climb effectively (It didn't hurt that it was the first climb of the day and before the temps rose to the mid-90's). The bike pedals impressively for such a big rig. The weight seemed manageable (compared to the AS-X) and the suspension was not like drowning in a bowl of Jell-o (again, like the AS-X). In fact, even out of the saddle pedaling resulted in negligible movement. Dave obviously knows something about doing single pivots right after experiencing the great pedaling manners of the DHR last year. Descending was smooth and confident. The Turner balance was in full evidence. There was no wheel flop or pushing through corners. The turning behavior was actually surprisingly sprightly for a big rig.












-----
 

·
on a routine expedition
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
<!-- message -->
superstock said:
Okay Doug, here is my initial impression of the Highline that I rode in these shots out at Fontana.

<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr> </tr></tbody> </table> I spent about an hour riding the medium over the moderately technical terrian offered out at Fontana. Although there weren't drops as big as I know this bike could handle, there were some decent size ones. Dropping a 4 four foot drop to flat was no problem on this bike. Popping the lip and making it into a 5 or 6 foot drop required a couple turns on the bottom out valve to handle the harder landing but I could tell I was still far from the limit of what this rig wanted to do. I noticed that the front is somewhat easy to pop up. When wheelie dropping, it doesn't take a huge tug to get the front up. Doing manuals on flat ground reconfirmed this. I'm sure this trait was designed into the bike since it makes doing drops more comfortable. The rock clearance is nice too, I would have been dragging my guide on my DHR on some of these suckers. It takes a little while for you to adjust your judgement for this (oh yeah, I can go over that ...) I think the bike jumps good. Its a little heavier than the DHR so it a little more sluggish to whip around. However, it does jump very predictably and smoothly and is again confidence inspiring. This bike also pedals well for a big bike. At the top of the course, you need to do quick sprint to get your speed up for the first corner. I couldn't detect any pedal feedback or significant amount of bob. As far as corning goes, it doesn't corner like a DHR. This bike was designed for freeride where hard corning isn't as important as in racing. It will corner, don't get me wrong, but you are a little higher up and two wheel drifts that feel comfortable on the DHR, do not feel as good on the Highline.

For what this bike is designed to do, I think it does it very well. Whether you're pointing it at drops or just leaning back and plowing through rock sections, this bike inspires confidence. You don't need to change your line and pick your way around rocks, you just go over them! This would be a great bike at Whistler.

Thanks to Turnerbikes for setting up the demo and great food. My wife commented that I was like a kid in the candy store, trying out all the different bikes...

Shaun
superstock said:
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr> <td class="alt1" style="border: 1px inset ;"> Originally Posted by Acadian
thanks for the review...

can you comment on how it performs under braking?
</td> </tr> </tbody></table>

Although I didn't get a lot of time to evaluate in this area (drop, stop, push back up), think it feels similiar to the DHR in braking. There is the firming of the rear when on the binders (skidding). Keeping off the brakes in turns seems to work for the Highline as it does for the DHR (and gives you better traction). The suspension was setup firmer on the Highline than on my DHR too so I don't know how accurate of a comparison I can make. It would be better to do long runs to really evaluate this (i.e. Garbonzo)...

Also, I forgot to thank Doug for hiking up the hill with the 50lb camera bag and getting some really good shots. Thanks Doug!

S
 

·
on a routine expedition
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
RatFink said:
Here are a few images from the Turner Dirt Demo in SoCal. David really put together a great day of bikes, friends and food. Hats off to everyone at Turner and big thanks to Joe and Mike from the Bike Co. for hauling everyone to the top over and over again!!! I personally would like to thank my photo subjects Shaun, Curtis and Moe!! P.S. Nothing but positive feedback from everyone that rode!!!!





More photos HERE.
 

·
on a routine expedition
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
turnerbikes said:
Fox DHX 5.0 coil shock. 2.75 stroke x 8.75 long

It will take a front deraileur, that is a priority for the project and 6 others!

After much research it seems that 15" BB was pretty much middle of the road for a 8x8

All the big forks are at least 8 now , so that is the 22.5 dim. Seems that the 888 and the 40 are the rulers.

That is THIS years production!!! What a shock I know.

The frame will clear a 27" diameter tire, depending on brand that could be a 2.5 or a 2.7 or a 3" As with all my designs, tire clearance is a major focus of the design. Mountainbikes, not road bikes! With a big tire on, it will still have mud clearance, as most of you don't live in the dez. If anyone has a DHR then you know what kinda tire clearance this will have, anyone have photo to post.The tire will only clear the seat tube at full compression by a little over 4mm. Front deraileur is not in danger.

DT
------
 

·
on a routine expedition
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
turnerbikes said:
About the cable routing. As you can all see, my first thoughts were not what will be. I like the "green" lines the best as the go through the main pivot which will bend the housing and brake hose in the most gentle arcs when run on the top of the down tube. As clean as the underside of the top tube is it will cause too much crumple and double under movement. So, the ONLY issue with the drive side green line is routing the cable on TOP of the C-stay. Ya'll will have to put a old tube over it to preserve the housing untill it wears out from the inside. I spoke with Scot @Go-Ride and he agreed that it would be a no problem solution for the smoothest arc. Thanks for the tip.

The link will be a welded together part with a thickwall cross tube. It will have to be well jigged to assure straightness. The reason that it is not one piece, and anyone familiar with my frames knows I like to support the scrap industry, is that the inner bearing faces of the 2 upper 1" wide pivots have a feature machined into them that needs to face the mill, not each other. With a full width 1/2" diameter steel bearing tube connecting the lower end and that upper yoke around the seat tube is not exactly made of foil, it will be fine. The proto type was 2 separate parts and not one of the testers said anything but "totally fine" when asked about rear stiffness. One of the guys is well over 6 ft and no XC racer, he took multiple drops at Mushroom Rock in Moab and with landing in the big G out with arcing left he would have noticed a problem.

The reason I have never put a fork stop on is that I would not know which fork to design it around. Forks from all over the world end up on Turner frames, and with almost every one having slip on rubber stops and my choice of tubes on dual crown bikes on the robust side I have not seen a need. I we were in the complete bike biz and spec'd a specific fork then it would make more sense and second fork choices be damned.

I do not think the price will be much different than the show price. 2K is not unreasonable when talking low #'s and big tooling bills.

I will post a right side view on Friday and I think the front deraileur clearance machined into the lower yoke will cause some fmb's. I am partial to my new huny for sure!

Appreciate the comments. The internet has made it much easier to get a consensus of
your wants and ideas.

David Turner
------
 

·
on a routine expedition
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
turnerbikes said:
Leprechaun is right, and GoRide was not the only shop I talked extensively about the direction the Highline was to take. All shops I talked to except one in BC said that the bike should be lighter and pedal as well as possible, cause everyone knows it sucks to try and pedal a 45lb bike uphill. Most riders out there want a free RIDE bike, not a big HUCK bike. So, I almost completely started over as far as links and angles and construction of parts goes. The next proto Highline will be the most compact free ride bike on the market. It seems that if you are under 6' tall most of the "freeride" bikes on the market will be caressing your dangling bits. The rear travel is set at 8 and the geometry is going to be the same as the show bike, but the Cstays are shortened to 17.25 with clearance for a 2.7 Minion on a muddy day. With a BB of 15" and a Straight Seat Tube at 72 degrees, that took some work. The shock is farther back in the frame and noticeably lower for a lighter feel.The link is one piece instead of 2 for stiffness and there will be one travel option only. If someone wants a quicker handling, lower BB free ride bike all they have to do is put a shorter fork on. The tubing is scheduled to be the same for the next proto as the show bike. The dropouts are still 150 spacing X 12mm through and the production bikes will have a alu. axle included. It will be 05 Saint or old school deraileur compatable. The frame is designed around the piggy back DHX 5.0 so anything should fit! Of course a front deraileur will fit. Cable routing, like all Turner bikes will suck and I am looking at all the other brands so that I have the worst in the biz when it is all done.
I am sticking to 1.5 on this frame. I have tried very hard to drop the weight and keep the strength. It will no doubt be lighter than the show bike, but I will not BS anyone with estimates and calculated weights. I will post a photo and weight when proto is done.

I must admit that a free ride bike is the hardest to design as it has the craziest range of potential users.

DT
------
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Good work SkullCrack!

Edit: You already had 'em in. My bad! :)
 

·
on a routine expedition
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
El Chingon said:
Had a chat today with Greg from Turner. I was voiceing my concerns about the cramped cockpit of the Large Highline for guys 6 feet and taller. He let me know that they made the mistake of setting the bikes up in DH mode for INterbike, and that since then they have had taller riders demoing them with single crown forks, and longer stems, and sizing is not an issue with that type of setup. He also let me know that the Large weighed in at 10.5 lbs, which is the same weight as the Large VP Free. The two colors being offered will be Raw, and Ano Black. Needless to say, I've got my name on the list for an Ano Black. Greg stated that the first ones should ship out middle of January.
.....
 

·
on a routine expedition
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
HaRt AttACK said:
Hi , With a 555mm A/C height, would a Marzocchi 66 RC2x fit the highline?

thank you.
The 66 will fit the Highline. It will steepen the HA somewhat, as the geometry numbers listed above are based on a fork with a 570mm A/C.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
850 Posts
jubilee said:
This is a great thread. Thanks guys.
Hey, I saw your thread in the WA forum about being in Olympia.... If you ever want to check out a highline in person drop me a PM, i can let you take some turns on mine.. Maybe i could show you around Cap forest one weekend....
 

·
aka DJ Papi
Joined
·
402 Posts
Hey airwreck

I really liked your Highline that I may just set-up my Highline like yours. My fork will be a Marz 66SL though... 5.6 lbs of 7" butter smooth travel...

What are the settings on your DHX-Air in your Highline?
 
1 - 20 of 359 Posts
Top