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A few years ago my wife graciously bought me a pair of Nokian 296 studded tires. Well needless to say they have yet to see paved roads much less dirt, snow and ice. I was actually thinking about selling them along with a couple of other things that need to find better homes.

However, when cabin fever sets in will I wish I kept them?

If you are reading this and use studded tires, in what conditions do you use them? Strictly hard-packed snow/ice covered trails? Are they appropriate for the current trail conditions (in Central/Southern Jersey) which are mostly dirt, some snow and some ice- or will that wear down the studs pre-maturely?
 

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Keep 'em

I have a set that I use on my singlespeed, when there's to much snow on the trails, I head out to the local lakes, and ride for hours upon hours. Saturday at Ringwood, there were 4 guys riding the trails with studded tires, and they seemed to be loving it.
 

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If you ever sell them, let me know.

I'm really thinking about making my own with screws and old tires. Crashing on ice hurts despite the extra clothing, and sometimes there's trees in the way too.

If you want to keep them that's good, I believe those will even take some pavement riding to get to the trailhead. And they're definitely a must for the winter here.

Maurice
 

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you ned to put about 30 road miles on the tires to wear them in
 

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I had the same set--the Nokian 296's. A rep comped them to me a ways back. Prior to that I had the Irc Blizzard's--a few less studs. The blizzards saw tons of use--for a while I had them mounted on a "city" bike (a modified scwhinn cruiser) that I used year round--lots of fun on the pavement to skid...if you do it right, you can get the bike to a 180, try real hard and almost a 160...

The blizzards I got because some buddies and I were always up at one of their houses in the poconos, mainly for boarding and skiing, but he lived in a development near a lake that would freeze. Some days instead of boarding I'd go for long rides on the lake (a big lake, like 14 miles from end to end, but if you stayed near the shoreline it was much more to bike). Lots of fun, I come upon various groups ice skating, fishing, playing hockey. Very different from a normal ride.

One thing I can say is that the ride TO the lake, which involved several decent climbs and descents, could be VERY sketchy, depending on conditions. Because the roads were hard packed with lots of small pebbles embedded in the dirt, UNLESS there was a coating of ice you had to be real careful or it felt like you WERE riding on ice, because of the studs on the pebbles. Same with pavement (which is what made it fun on the city bike). The studs want to skid and slide on rocks and cement. But on ice they hooked up nice, though you could still skid a bit if you tried, and turns you still had to be careful. Dirt they were fine. A place like hartshorn they work well, due to fewer rocks and the tendency for less snow, more ice (allaire too, as well as a lot of central/more south jersey). Places like chimney rock and ringwood I would think twice about running them, as even on icy days there tends to be way more rock exposed, and they're really sketchy on rocks.

They're not that good in snow (no different really than non-studded tires, no better or worse) unless there are icy conditions, and then they excell. Chains work better for looser snow, up to a point anyway.

I held onto the Nokians without ever mounting them for several years--finally sold them at the veloswap at trexlertown. I had them prices at $100 bucks for the pair, a bargain (that was practically wholesale for one at the time, but again, I got them for nothing). Many people wanted them but scoffed at the price--at one point like 10 guys were standing around eyeing them up but trying to bargain--with most of the stuff I had I had no problem bargaining but some things I wouldn't budge--when up comes a fella, picks them up, and hands me $100 bucks no questions asked.

So if you're going to sell them, you can definitely get good money for them, just hold out.

For what its worth, I helped several buddies stud their own tires, and the issue we always had with them (first, the time to stud them, second, studs coming out, and getting more flats than normal despite taping them up real good), I'd spend the cash on buying studded tires rather than make them. Just my opinion tho'.
 

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make your own

Molasses said:
A few years ago my wife graciously bought me a pair of Nokian 296 studded tires. Well needless to say they have yet to see paved roads much less dirt, snow and ice. I was actually thinking about selling them along with a couple of other things that need to find better homes.

However, when cabin fever sets in will I wish I kept them?

If you are reading this and use studded tires, in what conditions do you use them? Strictly hard-packed snow/ice covered trails? Are they appropriate for the current trail conditions (in Central/Southern Jersey) which are mostly dirt, some snow and some ice- or will that wear down the studs pre-maturely?
When I went to college down by Hartshorne I made my own studded tires that were way more aggresive than these lame over priced Nokian and IRC tires...go to Home Depot Lowes whatever and get 1/2inch screws with a rounded or head that is not sharp. Drill the suckers into the tires line the back with layers of duct tape and make sure the screws will clear your frame and fork first of course. then fill'em up and your on your way. Obviously no street riding but in nice hard icy conditions like I have at my house in Wawayanda the work great and stick like crazy.
 

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bozizle said:
When I went to college down by Hartshorne I made my own studded tires that were way more aggresive than these lame over priced Nokian and IRC tires...go to Home Depot Lowes whatever and get 1/2inch screws with a rounded or head that is not sharp. Drill the suckers into the tires line the back with layers of duct tape and make sure the screws will clear your frame and fork first of course. then fill'em up and your on your way. Obviously no street riding but in nice hard icy conditions like I have at my house in Wawayanda the work great and stick like crazy.
do you drop the tire pressure when you run the homemade studs?
 

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YEs

mtnbkr0101 said:
do you drop the tire pressure when you run the homemade studs?
YEs I would drop the pressure way down and had a bulky layer of duct taper for protection against the screws. Just be sure your screws are not too long obviously for clearence in the rear end. Usually I did a 2 1 2 pattern like. However the sets of 2 should be somewhat close as they will spread outwards once inflated.
 

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I've been riding studded tires (Nokian 296) for 8 seasons now, and just completed a couple of ice rides last weekend near Lewis Morris. Naturally, the studs excel on the ice. Contrary to some of the posts above, I find the 296's deep treads great for snow, and I don't think that narrower tires are necessarily the better choice for snow. I have found the trick is to manage your inflation:

For powder, higher pressure to get the snow packed under the treads nice and firm.
For looser, trodden/XC-skiied-on snow, lower pressure to provide better floatation.
For packed snow with not much ice, use regular tires.

My 296's have been excellent,and I've ridden them all over the parks in Northern NJ in the snow/snowpack/ice. My only complaint is that the sidewalls started to split along the casing threads (diagonal slices) about 3 years ago. I've patched them up successfully with dental floss, but after each ride, I find another 2-3 new slices. I had originally thought they were cuts from sharp edged-ice puddles, but have since determined that they always follow the threads, and are the result of running them with low pressure (e.g. 20 psi or so) to get better floatation. I have ordered a new set of 294's, hope to get them in a week or so.

Greg
(if you want more info, try me at [email protected] (remove the X's)
 

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hey there- I posted the pics contained in the thread (http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=148538&) above.. I ride in central NJ with these tires.. Primarily Allaire and Clayton. Maybe Mercer sometimes. I think the drillpoint screws are good since they are hardened and don't seem to wear down at all. I found the key is to have an old tube used as a liner. Duct tape is ok, but is tough to get to stick well and wears thru. You can run decent pressure- say 35-40psi. They work best on packed down snow or ice and can be a lot of fun.
 

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There is no way homemade studs stand up to Nokians

I have ridden both and frankly, my hakkas are far and above the homemade set! Perhaps it is the compound that the hakkas are made of. I have always thought that homemades are equal as well...until I finally got a set of nokians last week. Perhaps...just perhaps a studded set of stick e nevegals would be better, but I doubt it.
 
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