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That was a beautiful and fun day!!!!!


I vote all trials at Coe should be rerouted to either level or downhill
 

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locoyokel said:
Managed to get a short ride in this afternoon, and I got the tree on Elderberry - but not until almost dusk so it's odd that you didn't see the tree(s) ratpick, unless you came through there after 4:50 pm! I .
Actually, now that I've seen the pics I did see this tree. I was expecting something blocking the trail but I can see that this was dangerous the way it poked right into the trail! Thanks for clearing it!

locoyokel said:
Spike Jones is in great shape because someone's been maintaining hordes of drains - thanks whoever you are!
At the Coit Rd - Cross Canyon intersection, I ran into Bob/Bill (?) - the older dude that rides an 07 S-Works Stumpy and seems to always be there - parks right near the Hunting Hollow entrance. We chatted for a bit and he said he's been doing a lot of work on Spike Jones and was pleased how well it held up. So I guess he gets the credit (wish I could remember his name).
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Just a couple of notes. I am just back from a Coe Trail and Springs Committee meeting this evening.

Next trail day is Sat Feb. 13, Hunting Hollow 9am.

There will be a Sunday volunteer trail day on Feb. 21. While it doesn't work for Lokoyokel, it works for some, and will complement Saturday which the patrol needs to spend in the park doing radio training and a check ride. If weather is okay enough I might camp that night.

The equestrian group will be leading trailwork meeting at Hunting Hollow, 9am, on Sat Feb 27, and on Sun Mar 28. They will be working on Cattleduster and Domino. All are welcome to join in, and so let me extend their invitation to you. You don't have to be a horseman to work with them. They have been doing the maintenance on these trails. Seeing as how they are so nice to ride all the time, they deserve to recognized for all the work.

What are we working on next? I will be contacting staff to see if we can get one to come out with a chainsaw for the tree on the Grapevine to meet up with on the 13th of Feb. If we get a chainsaw operator, and good road conditions, we'll assign a couple of volunteers to assist the saw, and try to hit up multiple sites. Meanwhile the rest will do tread work.

For Sat 13 there are some spots on Grapevine I would like to see improved in terms of adjusting turns, trail flow, bumpiness, and drainage. These are not neccessarily high priorities, but are high value targets for one of the most well used trails in the park, and are possible only when the tread is workable. This would be a rain day plan. If we can't get a chainsaw operator, we might use a cross-cut saw.

Alternatively, further in, and needing good road and weather conditions, is the Kelly Lake trail (both ends) that needs serious attention. And as Lokoyokel pointed out it is getting nice and rugged. Diesel and I were discussing this last year, as a candidate for trail work. We have definite objectives in mind.

For Sun Feb 21, doing something about Serpentine is compelling. This would be a pretty hardcore trail-day. We might not be able to get or advise a vehicle to support tool transportation due to road conditions on a long drive. If neccessary I would dare pulling trailers up Spike Jones to Willson Peak, which would be a great workout for sure. Then returning down Grizzly Gulch doing repairs on places where the trail is falling away. Hopefully we could get an authorized person to drive to Willson Peak with tools and BOB trailers so we could work down, after riding up there.

One final important note for now: Please post your pictures of trail and road conditons and fallen trees with your comments, observations, and location. Staff is particularly interested in road conditions. For example photos of the condition of the Coit Rd slide just east Sierra View would be helpful.

The sooner problems are known, the sooner they can be addressed.
 

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Sorcerer said:
Please post your pictures of trail and road conditons and fallen trees with your comments, observations, and location. Staff is particularly interested in road conditions.
I noticed there was a fair bit of rutting on the short section of Wagon Road from Rodeo Pond up to the ridge to the east - and of course the ever-present big mud puddle right below Rodeo Pond, if they are interested in fixing that sort of thing. A few pics of other stuff:

Start of the hill on the east end of Jackson Road:



Very bottom of Kelly Lake trail:



Immediately below the new switchback on Grizzly trail:



Big rocks down on Newt Trail:

 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
It's probably not a good time or place to open up a can of worms like "The Future of Henry W. Coe State Park", but the insightful comments made here beg the question to me.

In the instance of Serpentine there is an intersection of a lot of different values that apply to the park trail system. Serpentine is an old jeep trail, or really, ranch road. It's orgin was to serve a certain ranching purpose. That old purpose is gone. The trail exists to serve a different purpose today, for which it was not intended upon its inception. The purpose we have on this forum, is riding a bike.

Amongst all the roads and hills to climb in Coe, Serpentine is not one of the hardest ones at all. It has a few levels, or areas of greatly reduced grade within it, spaced out at intervals, that give people a chance to recover. These intervals are a happy coicidence. If we go to work on Serpentine it will be primarily to arrest erosion and subtly gentrify it. The work won't be to neccessarily make it easier to climb. But if gutters are reduced and eliminated and precarious climbing on peninsulas of dirt is not required then it will be easier, in a technical sense to climb, because all one would need is the requisite fitness, and less finesse. How much finesse it needs is variable with the geometry, suspension, tires, rider position, and rider experience and skill. So, to some extent, bikes and their riders compensate for trail conditions. This however is a banal and frivolous topic and analysis. Either you can deal with the trail or not.

For certain, the steep hills and trails of Coe discourage some visitors. This is both good and bad. For my personal desire this is good. It keeps the park more pristine, reduces the harrasment of the indigenous biota. If an 8% average grade trail exists to the top of Willson Peak from Hunting Hollow one day, it would make it possible for more cyclists to ride up on more downhill oriented heavier bikes, and descend Severe, Spike Jones, and other trails more frequently. This could upset the peace. At that point, as well, it would be expected that unauthorized trail features might spring up to serve this new sort of use. Well, you can see where this might lead. But then again, it might not. Riding up 2k vertical is riding up 2k.

Serpentine is less than 900', isn't it?

The measure of a person is not how great they can ride a bike. Those of us caught up in an endless contest of speed, bravery, and fitness cycle are living in a system of synthetic values that serve no practical purpose except the fulfillment of a vacuous ego, good health, happy minds, comradeship with competitors, and the sustaining of the industrial economy that makes it all possible. Maybe that is all garbage.

We are lucky to have hills we can't climb, and trails that need fixing.
 
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