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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive been riding my size large 2019 stache 7 for about 8 months. I really like the bike and it came with a stock 60mm stem. I am running an aftermarket 760mm handlebar. I always feel though that the steering is just a tad slow. Like its not pointing/responding quickly enough to input especially when going fast. I was thinking of a shorter 50mm stem to quicken the steering. Anyone have any thoughts/similar experiences/advice on this?
 

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It must be your technique. Mine turns as sharp as Barry Sanders. Get down as low as you can by dropping the post and lean that baby over. You will be amazed how sharp it will turn. If you are just trying to "steer" it by turning the handlebars then that is your problem.
 

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What is your riding experience and what other bikes do you ride or did you ride before stache?

Could be technique, could be used to XC head angle, could be perception.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I mainly ride trail/xc. Previous bike was a spec Camber with 68 degreeHA. The head angle on the stache is slightly more slack but doesn't feel bad at all. I mainly notice the slow steering when riding fast through tight enclosed singletrack with trees on both sides.
 

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I'm not riding a Stache but I know the feeling; slow to start a turn wanting to run wide but wants to keep turning when it's time to go straight again. It's really obvious when you go from old steep head tube bikes. You can adapt to do it. It's taken me a while. It's a trade off made for better descending in chunk, which most are willing to make.

I also run shorter bars than most do nowadays, still way wider than in the olden days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm not riding a Stache but I know the feeling; slow to start a turn wanting to run wide but wants to keep turning when it's time to go straight again. It's really obvious when you go from old steep head tube bikes. You can adapt to do it. It's taken me a while. It's a trade off made for better descending in chunk, which most are willing to make.

I also run shorter bars than most do nowadays, still way wider than in the olden days.
^^^
That is the exact feeling. Its not super exaggerated, just enough that I notice a little bit on my weekly rides. Hoping a shorter stem can sharpen it up.
 

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Not a physicist but rotational inertia might be a factor.

Once those big wheels start spinning fast in a straight line it may be slow to take rider input when turning.

Not really sure if I worded that correctly at all :lol
 

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I have not noticed any issues with steering. It's snappy and quick. One thing though, I have upgrade itis (very bad case of it mind you). When I demo'd the bike I didn't get a chance to really put it through it's proper paces but it seemed very responsive to me.

Upon purchase I swapped out the stock stem with Race Face Turbine R 35 50mm and also the bars with Race Face Turbine R 35 (780mm width 10 degree rise). Then bumped up to same bar but different color and went to a 20 degree rise and 800mm width.

Current set up is same stem but again bars are now Race Face Atlas 35 with 35mm rise and 820mm width. All bars are 8 degree back sweep and 5 degree up sweep.

Sorry I'm not really offering much help here I guess but yeah, you could start by shortening your stem. Technique may be a factor I don't know but also the physics of your current set up could be as well. I'd start with a shorter stem and then go from there. Just my two cents
 

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Ive been riding my size large 2019 stache 7 for about 8 months. I really like the bike and it came with a stock 60mm stem. I am running an aftermarket 760mm handlebar. I always feel though that the steering is just a tad slow. Like its not pointing/responding quickly enough to input especially when going fast. I was thinking of a shorter 50mm stem to quicken the steering. Anyone have any thoughts/similar experiences/advice on this?
Reducing stem length by 10mm might help a little, but if you aren't already too short in your reach, I'd go to a 35mm stem.

Dropping your bars also might help a bit.

2.6-2.8 tires could make a difference in you're running 3" tires now. Also running higher air pressure will quicken things up.

Ride faster, that'll speed things up ;)
 

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What you're experiencing is due to mass and rotational forces, at first it doesn't want to turn in (need to lean in), then when you try to exit, wants to keep turning. A few things might help, first is to make sure you've got optimum air pressure, too soft and it will really exacerbate this, next try to lean in vs turning in, those big tyres take a lot to get them to respond.

You could try messing with cockpit setup, but I'm more convinced it more a case of technique vs setup, especially if this is your first time on 3.0" plus tyres. Also, some tyres self steer really bad, while others don't show any signs of it, so tyre choice can play a big role as well. A lot of the time on my plus bike I'm leaning into the turn while applying pressure to my inside hand to keep it from turning in too much, this on a rigid 29+ with a 68" HTA, when I had it setup B+/29+ with a 67.4* HTA, I had to concentrate more on tight, sharp stuff or it would push the front.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What you're experiencing is due to mass and rotational forces, at first it doesn't want to turn in (need to lean in), then when you try to exit, wants to keep turning. A few things might help, first is to make sure you've got optimum air pressure, too soft and it will really exacerbate this, next try to lean in vs turning in, those big tyres take a lot to get them to respond.

You could try messing with cockpit setup, but I'm more convinced it more a case of technique vs setup, especially if this is your first time on 3.0" plus tyres. Also, some tyres self steer really bad, while others don't show any signs of it, so tyre choice can play a big role as well. A lot of the time on my plus bike I'm leaning into the turn while applying pressure to my inside hand to keep it from turning in too much, this on a rigid 29+ with a 68" HTA, when I had it setup B+/29+ with a 67.4* HTA, I had to concentrate more on tight, sharp stuff or it would push the front.
Im 200lbs and probably about 210/215 with pack and running 17 psi front and back. I was running lower pressures and the problem was worse at the lower pressures. Someone at my lbs suggested trying 20psi but that seems high to me for 3.0 tire.
 

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Im 200lbs and probably about 210/215 with pack and running 17 psi front and back. I was running lower pressures and the problem was worse at the lower pressures. Someone at my lbs suggested trying 20psi but that seems high to me for 3.0 tire.
You just answered your own question.

If you want your tires to ride soft because you don't have suspension, then the compromise is pokey handling.
 

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I'm about 265 with hydration pack. I run 13f/17r with xr4 front/ xr2 rear. As I stated earlier I don't notice any slow stearing and my trails have a bazillion turns. Here is a sample of my trails. Disregard the speed as I was riding with a buddy who got injured.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You just answered your own question.

If you want your tires to ride soft because you don't have suspension, then the compromise is pokey handling.
Yeah 10-4. This is my first experience with plus tires. I your opinion do you think higher than 17 psi is normal for someone my weight?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'm about 265 with hydration pack. I run 13f/17r with xr4 front/ xr2 rear. As I stated earlier I don't notice any slow stearing and my trails have a bazillion turns. Here is a sample of my trails. Disregard the speed as I was riding with a buddy who got injured.
Damn, heavier than me and running lower psi without problems.. Now im getting confused. Love my Stache just want to get it 10 percent more dialed in and ill be good.
 

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Well, to me, I think you're probably good on the front (all depends on which tyre, casing etc), the back could probably do with bumping up a bit. Not sure HTF Huckleberry can run those pressures, I run a 29x3.0", DHF f/Chronicle r EXO casing on i39 rims, weigh about 180-185lbs geared to ride and while I can drop the front to a bit below 11PSI, if I do that and start going fast, I can count on rim strikes. Run the back around 15 PSI, any lower and it starts to squirm on me at higher speeds.

Im 200lbs and probably about 210/215 with pack and running 17 psi front and back. I was running lower pressures and the problem was worse at the lower pressures. Someone at my lbs suggested trying 20psi but that seems high to me for 3.0 tire.
 

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I'm running Duroc 50 (i45) laced to Hope hubs. I do small jumps and drops all the time without issues. Air pressure is checked with Meiser analog gauge.
 

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I'm running Duroc 50 (i45) laced to Hope hubs. I do small jumps and drops all the time without issues. Air pressure is checked with Meiser analog gauge.
I'm running the same hub and rims (I am still running the stock Bontrager front hub however). I'm 6'3" and between 210 and 220 geared up.

But I'm definitely the odd ball here as I run high pressures which is what I prefer. I run about 40 rear and 33-35 front.

I pick very careful lines through the chunky stuff but I live for big drops and jumps. I pretty much wore out the stock rear hub within the first 3 months on the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm running the same hub and rims (I am still running the stock Bontrager front hub however). I'm 6'3" and between 210 and 220 geared up.

But I'm definitely the odd ball here as I run high pressures which is what I prefer. I run about 40 rear and 33-35 front.

I pick very careful lines through the chunky stuff but I live for big drops and jumps. I pretty much wore out the stock rear hub within the first 3 months on the bike.
That high pressure with 3.0 tires?
 
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