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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Racer-X is my first foray into full suspension. I bought an older 2001 Racer-X with a Fox Float-R rear shock. I know that there is an adjustment/adaptation period for riding full suspension, but I can't seem to get this shock where I want it. If I put myself right smack in the middle of my weight recommendations I get what I think is too much pedal bob- the FSR design is supposed to eliminate a lot of this, right?? One way I am gauging pedal bob is by riding on flat ashphalt roads and putting my hand on the shock. I shouldn't be getting much, if any, bob just riding down the road, right? When I pump the shock up some more I have less bob, but the ride is pretty harsh. Any ideas?

Are the newer stable platform shocks really that much better at eliminating pedal bob?

I'm committed to trying FS for an entire season, but right now I feel like I was much faster on my HT.

sweet
 

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pedal bob

What you are experiencing is actually your weight shifting up and down on the bike, pedal bob would be chain tension causing the activation of your suspension which in a true FSR design can not happen because of the Horst link. What you are feeling is your body pushing down on the seat when you push down on the pedals. On smooth ground or pavement try and pedal smooth circles and watch how much less your suspension moves and how much more efficient your pedal stroke becomes.
 

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Proper air pressure

How have you been setting your pressure? Are you measuring the amount of sag? I know for current racerx's, they wait 3/8" to 1/2" of sag. Just making sure you're checking that. Good luck. You shouldn't be feeling any bob at all with your bike (maybe a small amount).
 

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Just give me hardpack
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I wouldn't worry about what your hand can feel. You will always get some movement at the shock - afterall it is set up wth some sag. Very little of that will however translate into less efficiency. It does take some getting used to though.
 

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craigstr said:
What you are experiencing is actually your weight shifting up and down on the bike, pedal bob would be chain tension causing the activation of your suspension which in a true FSR design can not happen because of the Horst link. What you are feeling is your body pushing down on the seat when you push down on the pedals. On smooth ground or pavement try and pedal smooth circles and watch how much less your suspension moves and how much more efficient your pedal stroke becomes.
lots of good advice here.

I'll add that you can send your shock to pushindustries to add SPV for $150.
 

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bobbing

To add to my other post, I have an RP3 on my motolite, which I can feel no difference between the three settings, heck, the lever doesnt even stay in any one of the three settings, that shock is going to PUSH as soon as I get my frame back from Titus(bearing play in a brand new frame). Anyway, I tried a FOX-RL in my motolite and tried climbing with the shock locked out, guess what, HUGE reduction in traction!!!! I thought it might be more efficient, but I was loosing traction everytime the trail got a little sketchy. Newcomers to full suspension often dont realize the greater climbing ability of FS bikes, they are too busy watching the shock move up and down. If you have to pedal so hard that your weight shifts are compressing your suspension, then you are in the wrong gear or the hill is so steep you wouldnt make it up on a hardtail anyway. Like I said in my other post, a smooth pedal stroke is where it is at. One thing I try to do is pedal in small circles, by trying to pedal in small circles, your cadence gets smoother and faster which in turn causes less weight shift induced suspension movement. Lance Armstrong has a cadence of close to 120rpm, 40 to 50 rpm higher than most "roadies", you cant argue with his success.
 

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set sag first

sweet said:
The Racer-X is my first foray into full suspension. I bought an older 2001 Racer-X with a Fox Float-R rear shock. I know that there is an adjustment/adaptation period for riding full suspension, but I can't seem to get this shock where I want it. If I put myself right smack in the middle of my weight recommendations I get what I think is too much pedal bob- the FSR design is supposed to eliminate a lot of this, right?? One way I am gauging pedal bob is by riding on flat ashphalt roads and putting my hand on the shock. I shouldn't be getting much, if any, bob just riding down the road, right? When I pump the shock up some more I have less bob, but the ride is pretty harsh. Any ideas?

Are the newer stable platform shocks really that much better at eliminating pedal bob?

I'm committed to trying FS for an entire season, but right now I feel like I was much faster on my HT.

sweet
I'd recommend 3/8ths of an inch. Make sure you make this measurement with your normal riding attire.

The movement you're feeling is normal and on the road it may seem excessive, but in it's natural habitat that feeling will go away and you'll experience the added benefits of increased traction and comfort. It might take a little while to get used to the new sensation of squishyness, just give it some time.

craig is correct though.....pedaling smooth circles will aid.

nomud nailed it too.

welcome to the world of squish !

later, Chad
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So you're trying to tell me all those hours on the rollers still hasn't smoothed out my pedal stroke? :)

I started adjusting the shock with the recommended sag (3/8" I believe). I liked the overall performance better when I pumped the shock up and had less sag. Of course, at that point I was almost locked out for everything other than larger hits.

Since I bought the bike used, I have no idea if the shock has ever been serviced. It is quite possible that both the oil and nitrogen are low. If this is the case and I am going to keep the same shock, it seems like the $150 Push upgrade is the way to go.

Chris
 

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sweet said:
So you're trying to tell me all those hours on the rollers still hasn't smoothed out my pedal stroke? :)

I started adjusting the shock with the recommended sag (3/8" I believe). I liked the overall performance better when I pumped the shock up and had less sag. Of course, at that point I was almost locked out for everything other than larger hits.

Since I bought the bike used, I have no idea if the shock has ever been serviced. It is quite possible that both the oil and nitrogen are low. If this is the case and I am going to keep the same shock, it seems like the $150 Push upgrade is the way to go.

Chris
First, there is some adjustment going from hardtail to full suspension. It takes a bit of getting used to but worth it. The RX is a good first fully and so there is less of a learning curve than with other longer travel options.

Next, if you have the true Mac-Strut version of the Racer-X (i.e. no X-Link starting 2002) then you don't have much choice on upgrade options. That bike takes a special shock that bolts on the seatstays and not compatable with today's standard shocks. So PUSH is pretty much your only upgrade opportunity. That's okay because they can revamp your Float to ride better than new. More plush and less bob. If you search the Titus forum, you'll find a couple of people who have done the PUSH mods to their older RX shocks with positive results.

Good luck and enjoy the ride.
 
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