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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking at building up a light XC race bike. The company I am using is offering the Pilot race, Duke U-turn or the Psylo U-turn with the bike. Reviews on these forks are not stellar however. Looking for recommendations on these or other forks that are light and good for racing.

I am also contemplating the SID team or World Cup.
 

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sircrashalot said:
I am looking at building up a light XC race bike. The company I am using is offering the Pilot race, Duke U-turn or the Psylo U-turn with the bike. Reviews on these forks are not stellar however. Looking for recommendations on these or other forks that are light and good for racing.

I am also contemplating the SID team or World Cup.
The Sid's are definitely one of the lightest forks out there, and a great deal of pro racers use them. I have a Sid on my race bike, a Giant XtC. But, I agree that the fox F80x and the F80RLT are excellent race forks as well. Despite the slight weight penalty, I think that they offer greater performance. You can also take a look at the Manitou Skarebs. They are relatively lightweight as well, but I personally feel they are better for lightweight riders. I blew the seals off my skareb comp after the 2nd ride. So i switched to a more aggresive trail fork for my Fuel 95, a Duke Race.
 

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synkronized23 said:
You can also take a look at the Manitou Skarebs. They are relatively lightweight as well, but I personally feel they are better for lightweight riders. I blew the seals off my skareb comp after the 2nd ride. So i switched to a more aggresive trail fork for my Fuel 95, a Duke Race.
Skareb is much stiffer than the Sid and fine for heavier riders as long as you put the proper spring in them. I used to have a Sid XC and now run the Skareb as a 225 pound clyde. You do get a gain for that extra .5 pound of weight a Skareb carries over a SID.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
80 or 100?

synkronized23 said:
The Sid's are definitely one of the lightest forks out there, and a great deal of pro racers use them. I have a Sid on my race bike, a Giant XtC. But, I agree that the fox F80x and the F80RLT are excellent race forks as well. Despite the slight weight penalty, I think that they offer greater performance. You can also take a look at the Manitou Skarebs. They are relatively lightweight as well, but I personally feel they are better for lightweight riders. I blew the seals off my skareb comp after the 2nd ride. So i switched to a more aggresive trail fork for my Fuel 95, a Duke Race.
I was looking at the Fox website and the weight diff from 80 and 100 mm versions is minimal. Is there a reason other than weight I would use 80mm vice 100mm?
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong....

sircrashalot said:
I was looking at the Fox website and the weight diff from 80 and 100 mm versions is minimal. Is there a reason other than weight I would use 80mm vice 100mm?
But I guess you can convert the 100 down to 80 internally. I would buy the 100 'cos it can double as a trail fork.
 

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Noleen Mega Air?

I have a 2005 Fox Float 100 RLT, a 2002 Noleen Mega Air, and a 2002 Marzocchi Marathon S (air, not coil like the newer S versions).

The Noleen is ~6 ounces (~175 grams) lighter than the Fox and is very nearly as stiff but uses a very simple all air damping system. This makes it very easy to work on, but also prone to being sticky if you don't grease it often or if you use high air pressures. It also dives more than the Fox or Marathon when braking. The Noleen's aren't easy to find these days though.

The Marathon is ~4 ounces (~100 grams) lighter than the Fox, but doesn't track as well as either the Fox or the Noleen. It also seems to have issues with dropouts cracking and internal leaks that drastically affect performance. When it's working, the damping is on par with the Fox.

The Fox is the most supple of the bunch, the damping seems to work best overall, but it is also the most expensive. I am currently having trouble getting full travel out of mine though. The 3" of travel that is there is very nice however.

All these forks are noodles compared to Maverick American's DUC32. The DUC32 is very nice and is light enough, but it's damping, tall height, and lack of longer stem options makes it not race worthy in my opinion. It also requires a special hub. This is not a bad thing in my opinion because it offers such a huge leap in stiffness, but is an extra expense and headache (have to build a new wheel). The SC32 could be a real winner if it has better damping. Too bad it is heavier than the Fox though, because it doesn't seem like it should have to be.

For a mostly racing application, especially something like a light hardtail, I would choose the Noleen at this point. In fact, that's exactly what I plan to do for my next build (light hardtail with Noleen mostly for racing everything but the roughest courses).
 

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sircrashalot said:
I was looking at the Fox website and the weight diff from 80 and 100 mm versions is minimal. Is there a reason other than weight I would use 80mm vice 100mm?
Yes it will change the geometry of the bike. I forgot the link that shows the bikes geometry being changed by going from a 80mm to a 100mm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Why...

Capt_phun said:
Yes it will change the geometry of the bike. I forgot the link that shows the bikes geometry being changed by going from a 80mm to a 100mm.
Can you explain the advantages of an 80mm vice a 100mm fork for XC racing. I am sure there is something, or everyone would use a 100mm. The two forks I am looking at are nearly identical in weight. Just different travel.

Thanks,
 

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sircrashalot said:
Can you explain the advantages of an 80mm vice a 100mm fork for XC racing. I am sure there is something, or everyone would use a 100mm. The two forks I am looking at are nearly identical in weight. Just different travel.

Thanks,
Well, an 80mm fork will definitely be rougher than a 100mm on drops and on the trails.However, the 80mm fork is shorter and your toptube sloping angle will be flatter, thus it will be a lot easier on the climbs. Also, the 80mm will provide sharper handling, while the 100mm will be slighter slacker, thus people usually use an 80mm fork for racing. Races are won on the climbs. And sharper handling will definitely give you an edge.
 

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sircrashalot said:
Can you explain the advantages of an 80mm vice a 100mm fork for XC racing. I am sure there is something, or everyone would use a 100mm. The two forks I am looking at are nearly identical in weight. Just different travel.

Thanks,
ok i think I remember seeing it in the new issue of Dirt Rag. By raising the front fork about one inch, going from 80 to 100mm, it will change the stance of the bike, and affect performace in terms of steering, seat angle, etc. Granted these are very small changes but it will affect the bike. Some bikes are built aroud 80mm forks, like my SC Stupidlight, while others are build around 100mm like the Turner Burner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Got it...

Capt_phun said:
ok i think I remember seeing it in the new issue of Dirt Rag. By raising the front fork about one inch, going from 80 to 100mm, it will change the stance of the bike, and affect performace in terms of steering, seat angle, etc. Granted these are very small changes but it will affect the bike. Some bikes are built aroud 80mm forks, like my SC Stupidlight, while others are build around 100mm like the Turner Burner.
Thanks for the lesson in race geometry. Apprecieate the feedback. I am looking at the Manitou Skereb Elite. I can pick one up for $350.00 for the '04. Looks like a good fork. It comes in both 80 and 100 mm.
 

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Don't spend $350 for a Skareb Elite, that is way to much. For $350 you can get a Skareb Platnium from Colorado Cyclist. Supergo has the Elite in stock for $224. You might also contact Chad at redbarnbicycles, who gave me a great deal on an Elite and will swap the spring should you need a different one for a good price.

Keep in mind that the Skareb is an Air/coil hybred fork and you need to make sure the proper spring is installed for you weight for it to work properly. Also, since you are racing, the SPV is probably well worth it to limit bob. Choose an 80mm or 100mm based on the recomendation of the proper fork length by your frame builder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
OOps

CDMC said:
Don't spend $350 for a Skareb Elite, that is way to much. For $350 you can get a Skareb Platnium from Colorado Cyclist. Supergo has the Elite in stock for $224. You might also contact Chad at redbarnbicycles, who gave me a great deal on an Elite and will swap the spring should you need a different one for a good price.

Keep in mind that the Skareb is an Air/coil hybred fork and you need to make sure the proper spring is installed for you weight for it to work properly. Also, since you are racing, the SPV is probably well worth it to limit bob. Choose an 80mm or 100mm based on the recomendation of the proper fork length by your frame builder.
I mis-spoke. I am looking at the Skareb Super. Is that still out of the ballpark?
 

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I.S. vs. Manitou disc brake mounts.

Don't forget that the Manitou forks use a different mount if you are going with disc brakes. Most disc brakes us the International Standard mount so you will likely need an adapter (additional weight & hassle) if you choose a Manitou. I don't understand why Manitou doesn't offer I.S. mounts. I won't consider their forks for that reason alone.
 

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If you can get the Platnium for the same price as the Super I would go that route. You may want to ask yourself however if you want a SPV fork or a lockout with TPC dampining, the primary difference between the two. I personally would opt for SPV and not having to reach down and lock out the fork.
 

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Question on geometry change using 80/100 forks. Could you not get a 100mm fork and set it up for around 30mm of sag thus getting close to the geomtry of an 80mm fork with say 16mm sag? Goal is to get quicker steering of 80 when desired and longer travel of 100 when desired. Crazy?
 

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You can, but...

Then the suspension would be too soft and you'll go easily thru the travel and even bottom it out. In addition it'd bob a lot or sink even more when out of the saddle.

Now... if the fork has adjustable compression damping, it could work as you would increase the damping so it would be less bottom prone.

I think...
 
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