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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up a '92 Klein Attitude a couple years ago and it has just sat in my garage. Finally going to build it up and ride it this year. I'd like to use new components if possible, so I'm wondering about compatibility issues considering this is an older bike. I'm hoping to throw on a suspension fork. Would love some suggestions on cranks and brakes. Would I be best putting on a rear rim brake and a front disc brake, or just go rim front and back? I don't want to alter the frame (ie, welding so I can install a rear disc brake). Thanks for any help. :thumbsup:
 

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That frame is not the best choice for using modern components. You'll be limited to forks with a one-inch steer tube, and unless you have the bottom bracket shell tapped for standard English threads, you're stuck with using square-taper cranks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Veloculture said:
My suggestion is to sell it to a collector that will appreciate it for what it's for and use the cash to buy a modern bike.
Care to expand? Sell it to a collector that is going to hang it on their wall, or sell it to a collector that will ride it as it is?

First, it's not currently ridable for trails in its current state. Frame is in great shape, but the components are not.

Secondly, the original owner had the original fork replaced with a suspension fork when he bought it in 1992. The original fork, which he included in the sale, is in pristine condition. I don't really feel like throwing it back on the bike at this time considering it looks great in my house, and seems like a crime to start using it now after all these years, especially considering a modern suspension fork would make more sense for the trails here in Utah.

And yes, I have a 2010 Spider 2 which I absolutely love. However, I might as well get some use out of the Klein rather than have it just sit (and no, I'm not interested in selling it at this time).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Roadsters said:
That frame is not the best choice for using modern components. You'll be limited to forks with a one-inch steer tube, and unless you have the bottom bracket shell tapped for standard English threads, you're stuck with using square-taper cranks.
Ahhhhhh. Thank you for the helpful input. So what options do I have for a fork? Do I basically need a Klein fork (or other fork from this era) designed for this bike, or are there other options you can suggest? Thanks.
 

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The Attitude used a proprietary head tube/headset not 1". To try to fit a modern fork to it you are really opening a can of worms, and just ending up with an old frame with a modern fork. Plus it uses a press fit bottom bracket that will limit your crank choices.

If you want to go modern, I agree with Veloculture. Sell this one to someone who will appreciate it for what it is, and find a modern hardtail frame. I think you'll be happier in the end and likely money ahead.
 

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If the frame and fork are in good shape there are lots of people who would want it for their collection. It would probably get built up with period parts and ridden a bit, but not super aggressively.

If you want a capable hardtail with modern suspension you would be better off taking some nice clear pics of the Klein and putting it on eBay, then rolling the proceeds into a new steed.
 

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I'm gonna ride mine till we both snap in half. But if it sat around that long without taking it out...Sell it. You weren't using it anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My goodness. Why all the SELL! SELL! SELL! comments? Yes, it has sat in my garage for the last two years because a) I have a 2010 Spider 2 I love and took up quite a bit of funds and b) I haven't had a lot of time to work on it.

I should have some time to work on it before the snow melts here in Utah, and I would like to get some use out of it. It would also be nice to have a second bike available when friends come for a visit.

Guess it sounds like getting working/used parts from that period is the best option. Thanks...I think. ;)
 

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yeti575fanboy said:
Care to expand? Sell it to a collector that is going to hang it on their wall, or sell it to a collector that will ride it as it is?
The sorts of enthusiasts who frequent this forum wouldn't be happy to see a frame as nice as a '92 Klein turned into a beater. It isn't clear if that is your intention or not. For the purposes of my reply, I will assume you want to appreciate it for the very nice bike that it is but may not have the necessary parts to do so.

Trust me, trying to refit an old frame with a modern parts kit will be expensive, frustrating, and ultimately unsatisfying. You'll need all sorts of tweaks and adapters and end up with a bike that looks funny and rides poorly and that will be the end of your project.

Instead I would suggest:
  1. Determine what components on the bike are refurbishable and what needs to be replaced
  2. Refurb what you intend to keep
  3. Find suitable replacements for what you cannot salvage
  4. Go out and ride it
  5. Keep an eye on ebay to upgrade your temporary parts to proper period correct / OEM when available

All it takes is an ebay account and a lot of patience to spec out a vintage bike as it should be.

Even if your suspension fork is in bad shape, you can get it refurbed professionally for a reasonable price.
 

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Mr90's advice sounds good to me. I think the main questions are:

1) What components do you think are non-functional and why?
2) What fork is currently on the bike?
3) What's your goal for it? i.e. why the modern components?

Take some detailed pictures and post them here and people will get a better idea of the actual condition. Older MTB components often hold up surprisingly well, so there's a good chance you'll be in good shape with new cables and housing, brake pads and proper cleaning, lubrication and adjustment. Going with modern drivetrain parts could mean changing almost everything. 9- or 10-speed may simply not fit due to rear dropout spacing (it's aluminum, so you can't just bend it) and, even in the best case, would require a new rear hub.

An older suspension fork might be a bigger issue, but it's possible it just needs airing up (if something like a Mag-21) and/or that Hippietech suspension, or another shop, will be able to service it for you. Even if you find one that fits, almost any modern fork would throw off the geometry and risk taking messing up the responsive handling that made the bike popular in the first place.
 

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I would even suggest putting the rigid fork back on. Those bikes are great, trying to modernize it would be a shame.
 

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OP,

I bought a '92 Attitude that had been retrofitted w/ a Judy FSX which, although really cool and fairly rare, made the bike handle like absolute crap. I rode it on a fairly tight, twisty trail and the fork jacked up the geometry enough to make the handling skitterish and vague.

Keep in mind that my Judy has only a few inches of travel as opposed to the newer, higher-travel forks...

Luckily, the seller had the original rigid fork and i had that swapped in and it made a huge different in the handling.

People are telling you to sell because Kleins of that vintage are worth pretty good money and those of us in the vintage game like to see nice vintage bikes being treated with respect. What you're asking is like taking a '67 Vette and adding parts made for a Honda Civic. Sure, they may ARGUABLY make it perform better but that sure as hell doesn't mean it's a good idea.

But, it's your bike so if you REALLY want to add a suspension fork you'll have to find an adapter w/ the proper sized steerer. I'm sure they exist but I haven't seen any others besides mine...and no, you can't have it ;)

EDIT: the only caveat to my advice is if the frame is in crappy, but structurally sound condition. In that case, a "resto-mod" is a bit more forgivable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Rumpfy said:
Because it sounds like you're going to ruin it.
How so? Have you read this thread (even the OP), or did you just decide to skim through and pile on?

I specifically said from the the beginning I did NOT want to modify the frame in any way. I've also said a few times since getting some helpful responses that it sounds like I am better off going with components from that period.

I also said I own the original fork. It's never been used. If I didn't give a $%^% about the bike, I'd just throw it on and beat the **** out of it.

With the responses I'm getting here, you would think I asked you guys how I can do some welding to get disc brakes on here and modify the head tube so I can throw on a Lyrik. Maybe even cut up the frame and find a way to mount a rear shock. Sweet Jesus.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
chefmiguel said:
I would even suggest putting the rigid fork back on. Those bikes are great, trying to modernize it would be a shame.
Yes, after reading some of the more helpful responses, I'm leaning towards doing that. However, there is a part of me that doesn't like taking a never used fork from a '92 Klein Attitude and throwing it on after all these years. I can't imagine there are too many around in its condition.

So what are my options for getting a rigid fork? I'm happy to get an older used one, however I did shop for one when I first got the bike. I finally found one on Ebay, and despite having lots of chips/scratches in it, it still went for $500. Don't really want to put that kind of money into a rigid fork that's only going to get occasional use. Hope I'm not opening up another can of worms. :p Thanks.
 

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If the frame is in far worse shape than the fork, and you just want to ride it, I'd almost want to just sell the fork. You'd get enough from the proceeds to revamp the bike into a nice rider. It is rare to have a NOS one. Depending on the paint color, that could get some really nice parts going on the frame as it stands.

This thread needs pics.
 
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