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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
'm bored and stuck in/alone on this Holiday Friday so I got to thinking. I have a 1996? Marin Pine Mountain that I rode for the last 12 years (basically my whole life) until I bought my current bike this summer and got very excited about riding, starting hanging out here and riding 4+ days a week.

Long story short- I know nothing about bikes beyond what I've figured out by briefly looking at them when they break (and with my limited experience that is quite limited). I do have a lot of experience wrenching on cars though. I'm this far into tearing down my one-off custom supercharged AMG Mercedes-



I'm sure most of you who would care about the car have seen it on various local forums etc.- to keep it short it's basically all custom performance stuff and hoping for close to 500 crank horsepower.

I'd like to think that my automotive experience and the tools I do have will help me to learn to be able to work on bikes etc. etc.

I've always found that it's best to learn "hands-on" by actually completing projects etc. and so I come back to the aforementioned Marin-













so- here's what I want to do with it-

1. single speed
2. cut weight
3. make it fit better- it's a tiny bit big
4. keep it under $300 invested (this will be commuted on and I can't justify spending much more than that and then leaving it in front of my building-- if i can do something awesome for more I can, but would like to hold to $300)
5. learn as much as possible (so would like to change as much crap as possible to help me learn)

I got a "how to" bike mechanic book for Christmas lol which may help a lot and may not- I guess I'm just looking for where to start.

best way to go SS (parts?)
what brakes to run- definitely needs upgrade
wheel improvement?
front fork? (i think I'd like a bit of travel)

thanks a lot

-Drew
 

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You have a 50K + car and you need to leave a 300 dollar bike outside?

I'm guessing you're some kind of troll but I'll bite anyways.

If you are really building that Mercedes up you need no help with wrenching tips, right?

Anyways, for fit, get a shorter stem, and maybe move your saddle forward in the rails.

Those brake levers were really nice in the day, but they are canti's, meaning any brake change requires a complete switch to V's. You likely have nothing more than a bad set up if you have no power.

Leave everything else alone except for the drive train. Get a singlespeed cog and spacers for the back and ditch all the front rings except the middle unless it's worn out too.

Hopefully your gearing choice will allow you to run no tensioner, or maybe a half link at worst.

The bike is worth almost nothing (old) so changing anything else is pointless.

Drew
 

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I'd have to agree on the brakes. Those canti's should stop a commuter just fine assuming that the pads are in decent shape and they're adjusted properly. Read the following two links from the bible

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/cantilever-geometry.html
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/cantilever-adjustment.html

Like Dru said, shorter stem for adjusting the reach. Spacers should be cheap at your LBS. Remove the rest of the cables/shifters, etc. There's not a lot of adjustment for your wheel, so you'll have to play with chain length or get a tensioner. clean and lube the chain or get a new one since it's pretty rusty right now. The conversion should be under $100 w/o the stem I'd bet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
wow- never thought the car thing would make it look like I was a troll?

I'm not the kind of person who throws away anything of value. The things I have get as taken care of as I know how etc..

I may know how to use tools, but as stated above I know not what I need to know about bikes. Many of the tools are very different than on a car and the parts are not all self-explanatory. I know it sounds dumb, but until I started to get into biking a lot more and realizing that I would need to be able to fix things on the fly to be competitive etc. etc. I had never even worried about changing my own tire or adjusting derailure etc.

I honestly spent 4 or 5 hrs this week just looking at bike cleaning/maintainence how tos.



I also have plans to upgrade some basic stuff on my Trance X3 (probably entire drivetrain, stem, bars and seat post) and many of those parts will trickle down onto the Marin or my girlfriends bike.


is there a decently cheap way I can get a front disc brake?

I know I said this is a commuter, but I want it to be as capable as possible as I will likely ride it on trails in winter some.

I have been riding 3-5 times a week even in winter here- despite my relative newbness with working on the bike I do/have rode quite a bit.
 

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2silent said:
is there a decently cheap way I can get a front disc brake?
Gonna need to get a disk capable front fork, plus a disk brake caliper/rotor, cabling and ferrules, and maybe a lever. A Surly 1x1 fork would do the trick ($70 or so). $50 or so for a BB5 caliper w rotor.

your cheap singlespeed project is getting more expensive by the minute.
 

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Sorry friend, just thought you were baiting on the 1st post.

Your pictures were odd that's all; really nice car, and an old bike that was not taken care of since it is rusty as hell.

As I said earlier there is no sense throwing money at that ride, unless you were going to do a complete retro restore, and even then it's not unique, unlike the AMG.

A fork as good as the Judy and a disc set-up for the front will be a minimum of 200 bucks used.

The SS conversion with new rings and chain will be 60 bucks at least.

A shorter stem will be 30 used....

and so on.

Don't spend a bunch of money, the bike is old.

Case in point; the local club sold a 2001 Rocky Thin Air for 250 back in the summer.

Just convert it to SS and ride it.

Drew
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
came into some new wheels today- circa 1998 Mavic somethings? with a clean cassette etc. and wheels are in great condition. They are more of a cross style laced to mtb hubs (i guess?) and currently have cross style tires.

I guess I'm going to rock these for commuting- I know some of the local guys here do go for decent length rides on dirt roads at times too, so maybe it will work for that.

only issue now is- do I need to double up on spacers and cogs? so I can run both wheel sets? I mean obviously I do, but will I see a use for both?

-Drew
 

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Two

If you're going to get two wheelsets, run higher gearing on the one you want to use commuting. Unless your local trails are extremely fast you will not be geared high enough for commuting, nor low enough for offroad. The ss thing is a little bit of a compromise in these matters. I've only tried it once or twice and can tell you it will make you hella strong, but personally I prefer gears. Yes, you'll need two sets unless you want to be wrenching every time you want to switch wheels. Get a set of slicks for your road wheels too, they make a huge difference.

Drew
 
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