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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm having trouble with my shock mounting hardware and getting a little lost in the weeds.

Problem is the shock has shifted on the front mount. I'll figure out why that's happening elsewhere, but right now I can't move the front "cylinder" that runs through the eyelet/bushing to save my life. So, first question: is it normal for the cylinder to be impossible to get out by hand?

To get this thing out I'd like to buy a tool rather than take to the shop, bc I think I might be playing with this for a while. But problem 2 is that the tools I see sound like they are for remove/install of the DU bushing rather than the cylinder that runs through the bushing/eyelet of the shock. I was about to buy this -
https://www.backcountry.com/abbey-bike-tools-du-bushing-service-tool
- but then realized it might not be any help with the cylinder. Or does one tool do it all?

Any insight is appreciated!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, great link.

So, it looks like the vise and socket is the official way to get this done? Is there not some bike-specific tool for this? The guy at the shop who helped me a while ago had some little threaded tool... maybe he used a vise when I wasn't looking.
 

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S usspect;14209055 said:
Thanks, great link.

So, it looks like the vise and socket is the official way to get this done? Is there not some bike-specific tool for this? The guy at the shop who helped me a while ago had some little threaded tool... maybe he used a vise when I wasn't looking.
That little threaded tool was probably the bushing tool, it's significantly more difficult to get those out without the tool. In theory the reducer/pin should be a snug finger-strength press fit. It often is not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I use vice and socket, or a long bolt, with a nut and a socket, same thing I use as a bearing press.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
That little threaded tool was probably the bushing tool, it's significantly more difficult to get those out without the tool. In theory the reducer/pin should be a snug finger-strength press fit. It often is not.
Alright thanks everyone, I picked up a small vise from Lowes and it did the job. A little fiddly, Park Tool could probably fill a niche here, but it worked. In my case, the reducer/pin is definitely not just finger-snug. But hey, now I've got a vise in the shed.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I bought this tool, it works well at removing the hardware as well as the bushing, although for fox IGUS bushings you have to pry one off first with a fine-flathead or something.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Rear-Shock...=183819689891ea85e3b8ae0c43bb9d01c72f95323de8
Thanks man... this looks like what I need.

Weird that mainstream co's aren't making this. This is sort of no-brand stuff, shipped from China. And hard to find, I was searching for it and coming up empty.

I'll get one.
 

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S usspect;14210149 said:
Thanks man... this looks like what I need.

Weird that mainstream co's aren't making this. This is sort of no-brand stuff, shipped from China. And hard to find, I was searching for it and coming up empty.

I'll get one.
Rock Shox sells one that is commonly available. I have both sets, I'm not sure which I prefer. The Rock Shox one is steel and the threads were cleaner but I was able to get the no-name one to smooth up with minimal effort. I haven't used it nearly as much as the RS one to have formed a preference. It may be less likely to mar the shock eye if you aren't careful and let the tool body spin or move against the side of the shock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Rock Shox sells one that is commonly available. I have both sets, I'm not sure which I prefer. The Rock Shox one is steel and the threads were cleaner but I was able to get the no-name one to smooth up with minimal effort. I haven't used it nearly as much as the RS one to have formed a preference. It may be less likely to mar the shock eye if you aren't careful and let the tool body spin or move against the side of the shock.
Huh... okay, interesting. I was looking at this one on Amazon, in the Q&A section people were saying it's for bushings only and the spacer/cylinder "should push out by hand". So there was some confusion.

Like I said, I've been lost in the weeds. Glad to get some insight... now hopefully I can figure out why the front mount keeps developing some play... worn bushing is my next guess (but unsure bc the cylinder was so damb tight in there :confused:).
 

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S usspect;14210405 said:
Huh... okay, interesting. I was looking at this one on Amazon, in the Q&A section people were saying it's for bushings only and the spacer/cylinder "should push out by hand". So there was some confusion.

Like I said, I've been lost in the weeds. Glad to get some insight... now hopefully I can figure out why the front mount keeps developing some play... worn bushing is my next guess (but unsure bc the cylinder was so damb tight in there :confused:).
What sometimes happens is that the pin/reducers are too tight to rotate in the bushing so the entire assembly rotates in the frame and on the bolt, this can damage the frame mounting points and will definitely loosen up and cause problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What sometimes happens is that the pin/reducers are too tight to rotate in the bushing so the entire assembly rotates in the frame and on the bolt, this can damage the frame mounting points and will definitely loosen up and cause problems.
I think I've narrowed things down; even though they are tight, the pins do seem to be able to rotate in the bushings as much as they need to (which isn't much in the KS Link suspension). The bolt is not rotating as I move the suspension through its range of motion. But, the bolt has wiggle room when I slide it through the pin, I can wiggle it a bit from each end. What that means, I would think, is that the wiggle is only taken out by the clamping force of the bolt as it's tightened against the frame tabs - that just doesn't seem right! I am guessing the bolt should fit much more snugly. The bolt seems to measure a true 8mm across it's length, so I assume the bolt hole in the pin is worn or has poor tolerances.

Am I doing this right?

I have sourced a replacement for the mounting hardware, but may have to reuse the bolt.

History of problem: took the bike to LBS to get help understanding why the shock slid left on the front pin, crushing the rubber washer. Bike shop re-centered it, but it slid left again on a test ride around the block. Shop said, "We don't know, it may be misaligned" and sent me on my way (no charge). Back at home, I have compensated by sliding the rear pin a bit to the other side, so centered front pin lines up with frame. Took it on a 5 mile ride today, and the front did not slide sideways on the pin, but the shock developed up/down play; I could feel the front bolt heads shift when lifting the bike by the seat.

Theory: I should replace the pin/hardware.
 

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S usspect;14210941 said:
I think I've narrowed things down; even though they are tight, the pins do seem to be able to rotate in the bushings as much as they need to (which isn't much in the KS Link suspension). The bolt is not rotating as I move the suspension through its range of motion. But, the bolt has wiggle room when I slide it through the pin, I can wiggle it a bit from each end. What that means, I would think, is that the wiggle is only taken out by the clamping force of the bolt as it's tightened against the frame tabs - that just doesn't seem right! I am guessing the bolt should fit much more snugly. The bolt seems to measure a true 8mm across it's length, so I assume the bolt hole in the pin is worn or has poor tolerances.

Am I doing this right?

I have sourced a replacement for the mounting hardware, but may have to reuse the bolt.

History of problem: took the bike to LBS to get help understanding why the shock slid left on the front pin, crushing the rubber washer. Bike shop re-centered it, but it slid left again on a test ride around the block. Shop said, "We don't know, it may be misaligned" and sent me on my way (no charge). Back at home, I have compensated by sliding the rear pin a bit to the other side, so centered front pin lines up with frame. Took it on a 5 mile ride today, and the front did not slide sideways on the pin, but the shock developed up/down play; I could feel the front bolt heads shift when lifting the bike by the seat.

Theory: I should replace the pin/hardware.
It's not usually that the bolt rotates but that the pin rotates with the shock inside the frame mount tabs. But either way is bad, ideally the bolt is tight enough that it and the pin do not move at all. The lateral shift is also bad. Don't expect the bolt to be a perfect fit in the pin, it doesn't need to be if everything else is right. It sounds like your bolt was too loose or the pin too tight and something has gotten boogered up. New hardware is a good start, and you need to make sure the hard points and holes on the frame are all aligned and square and even. You want that shock mount bolt torqued down with the bike on the ground, and that bolt needs to be perfectly perpendicular to the bike. It doesn't have to be perfectly sized if it's lined up right. If the mount got damaged you may have to tweak it a bit to square it back up by removing as little metal as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It's not usually that the bolt rotates but that the pin rotates with the shock inside the frame mount tabs. But either way is bad, ideally the bolt is tight enough that it and the pin do not move at all. The lateral shift is also bad. Don't expect the bolt to be a perfect fit in the pin, it doesn't need to be if everything else is right. It sounds like your bolt was too loose or the pin too tight and something has gotten boogered up. New hardware is a good start, and you need to make sure the hard points and holes on the frame are all aligned and square and even. You want that shock mount bolt torqued down with the bike on the ground, and that bolt needs to be perfectly perpendicular to the bike. It doesn't have to be perfectly sized if it's lined up right. If the mount got damaged you may have to tweak it a bit to square it back up by removing as little metal as possible.
Okay, thanks, it's entirely possible that the pin has been rotating with the shock inside the frame tabs, I hadn't thought of that.

I've ordered new hardware from tf tuned, and from the look of it this will provide a stable base to work from, with bushings and pin that will function perfectly with each other.

Of course I'm hoping it fixes everything... we shall see. Thanks for your help with this.
 
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