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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So instead of trying to buy another bike which I can't afford I want to try and lighten up my vp-free so its a little easier to pedal around for those trail days. I'm thinking a different wheel set and fork might be in order. Any other suggestions would be great.
Currently the build I have is:

Meanwhile the vp-free comes with:
Fox 40R
Race Face Diabolus 31.8 stem and bars,
Race Face seatpost,
Intense lock on grips,
Chris King headset,
Truvativ Holzfeller Crankset 22/32 al 7050 tv
Saint Brakes,
WTB Timberwolf 2.5 tires,
WTB power V Saddle,
Mavic x729 disk wheels
Azonic A-Frame pedals,
XT rear derailer,
LX front derailer,
LX shifters.

I've got a sram X.0 RD and trigger shifters set to go on very soon.
 

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Glad to Be Alive
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it is all about the money you want to spend

save a pound by getting a TI-spring for the shock $200.00

TI/Mag A Frame pedals......200 bucks

823 rims and go tubeless another 200 (includes building them)

this will save you more than 3 pounds
 

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Fork and wheels would be the most obvious components, Shiver guy got some really good point.
You should also consider running a smaller tire on the rear, 2.3 or something, less rolling resistance. Not much wigth difference but it makes a difference in the way it pedals up the hill; that is if you are going to do some general trail riding, keep the 2.5 for DH.
Also consider changing your Seatpost and Saddle, an SDG I beam combo will bring both to under a pound (right now you are at 1.6 with the Diabolous and the Power V.

All together you might be saving over 6 pounds.
 

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Equal opportunity meanie
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Holzfeller bars and a Thomson stem/seatpost. Ditch the RaceFace stuff up front. 823 or 721 tubeless setup. Saddle could be anything lighter, but that depends on what you want to sacrifice in durability and comfort.

I have always thought the Fox 40 has steered big because of how far apart the stanchions are. Get an '06 Boxxer.

And for the love of god ditch the Timberwolves and get a tire that actually hooks up. They're heavy, pinch flat like none other, and are about as useful as slicks in washy dirt, not to mention a B!TCH to get on and off the rim.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm thinking for a lighter fork I want to go to a single crown so maybe something like a fox 36. what tires do you guys recomend?
 

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Had my VP Free way light.................. Wheels, go tubeless as mentioned, seatpost and brakes................. All depends on the lute you have.............
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
do it all

Its sorta my do it all bike up here. I mean i have an 05 s-works stumpjumper back home and I'm thinking about getting it sent up here to boston instead of buying parts for the vp-free.
 

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deck it all with xtr stuff. put a 66ligth eta up front and a fox dhx air back. then get a carbon fiber bars a thompsom stem, also you can get a carbon fiber seatpost and ti bolts for everything on the bike. but at that point you better get a dirt bike.
 

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If you already have a nice light trail bike, I would go with 2 bikes. I've always had to have a "does it all" bike before last year. Now that I have 2 rigs it sure makes a lot more sense. I use the Demo 9 for a good portion of the riding, but when I know I'm going to be doing extended hills I hit it with the Enduro. Man, I wish I had the Enduro a long time ago...
 

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I ride a DH/FR bike around the boston area, but it's setup to be lightish and for pedaling. Still, it weighs 37 lb and has full dh tires, but those are coming off.
 

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Dude - you'll throw as much money into lightening your VP-Free as you would in buying a second GOOD all-mountain bike used. And then you would still need to change wheel sets depending on the type of ride and possibly re-adjust your disc brakes for tolerance every time you rode.

A friend of mine poured several thousand dollars and over a year of his life chasing this white whale. After hitting the wall on a two hour trail he conceeded he needed a trail bike. VP-Free's a great bike but there's no middle ground for DH and XC where you'll be satisfied at both extremes.

I'd recommend either shipping your S-works Stumpjumper to Boston or selling it to buy an all-mountain bike in the 6" travel range. Heckler with a 6" fork will still let you freeride a bit and pedal. Enduro II looks pretty sweet as well.
 

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could save some weight and go with a thompson 50mm X4 stem, Easton EC90 DH carbon bar, Ti spring, personally i would switch out the cranks to Saints (not sure about weight loss, but they are better than anything truvativ has ever put out), do the tubless thing, Thompson post or go with an I beam set up, could get some lighter weight 2.5's but with out the dh sidewalls (kenda blue groove, and nevegal. But stay away from the light weight 2.5 timberwolf, i have one and it really tosses the salad), and lastly get some sort of light weight pedals. If all else fails, do what Dave 99 said and just sell off the Spec. and get something with a little more travel that pedals good.
 

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I would try buying a new wheelset / tires for pedaling. You can feel every gram of rotating mass on the wheel/tire combo... I'm going back to WTB Mutanoraptor 2.4s on my bike for this reason. They are less than 600g, and I may also try stan's because I can't use lightweight tubes w/out flatting. I'd like to get a burly set of DH rims/tires w/ 2.5s for resorts/shuttles someday. You can save around a few hundered grams on each rim, and possibly up to 1000g per rim by running lighter tubeless tires. Thats HUGE. And you can still put the DH wheelset on when you want. If its still not the bike you want, you can use that new lighter wheelset on an am bike.

For the rest of the parts, determine how much $$$ per weight youre willing to spend, but I'd try a lighter wheel/tire combo and see if that does it for you.

I wanted a do-it-all bike, and am ending up with a Giant AC that'll be about 36.5 lbs, 6" rear travel, 5.5" - 7" front. The only downhill specific parts I used are bb and headset. I'm 190 lbs...
 

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I can't believe nobody has made a bigger deal about the saddle.

Firstly, the power V is a boat anchor @ 440g, so a 200g saddle would save you .5 pounds. That's a good $/g deal right there.

I'll get nerdy for a moment:
Any time your bike rolls side to side , how 'light' it feels while swaying/rolling is dependant on the moment of inertia, and the farther away a mass is from the object's center of mass, the more it alters the moment of inertia.

For the same reason, any time your bike or front wheel changes heading, spinning wheels make a big difference not only because they're spinning, but because they're at the extreme front and rear of the bike.

Back to reality:
This means that when sprinting, table-tops, laying over quick corners, and time your bike rolls, your saddle is about the worst place to have excess weight.

A ti spring saves weight outright, but in terms of overall benefit, where you save weight is more important than how much. Also take into account your $/g before making purchases. Happy dieting.
 

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Whafe said:
Had my VP Free way light.................. Wheels, go tubeless as mentioned, seatpost and brakes................. All depends on the lute you have.............
Damn that's sexy
 

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FYI - I have an Enduro built up that weighs in at a svelte 31 lbs - with a decent build. My pal has an identical frame, built with coil shock et al, and his weighs 41 lbs.

You can do a lot with the build, but the VP-free isn't a particularly light frame, and it is going to cost you in two areas 1) dollar and 2) DH performance. On the other hand it is going to benefit you in two areas 1) uphill/flat riding ability and 2) how tired you get.

You can spend as much on this project as another bike would cost you, so ask yourself if you really want to go down that route for the sake of the geometry you have with the VP-f or if you should just upgrade your stumpjumper a bit....

FYI - build kit on mine saves weight here:
1. Carbon Easton bars
2. Thomson stem/post
3. Ti-saddle
4. LIGHT WHEELS (Mavics 500g rim, Sapim spokes, Hope Bulb/XC Ti hubs) - only bother if you are a light rider and don't crash through everything in sight!!
5. DHX-Air and Fox 36 TALAS
6. Maxxis Minion 2.35 Single plys
7. XT cranks + E-Thirteen guide with 36 ring
8. XT brakes, with Goodridge lines and Aztec 203mm rotors (these are light as hell)

Hope this helps. My mates bike is obviously faster DH than mine by some amount (a lot? I doubt it, but some for sure) as he has 5th Coil shock, 36 VAN, Race Face Diabolus cranks, CrossMax XL or Deetrax wheels, etc....
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well i have an 05 s-works stumpjumper back home that I loved riding on the smoothed out trails in florida but now that I'm in new england I've found the riding to be a lot more techy which is why I've been leaning towards getting more of an AM frame like an intense 6.6 or an enduro and swapping everything over. The biggest reason I didn't do this in the first place was whenever I went riding back home I always brought both bikes and I could just switch over to my vp-free when i wanted to ride the heavy duty stuff.
 
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