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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking to pick up a single trail bike to cover NorCal trails (UC/Demo/JNT/Skeggs).

Between the Stumpy ST vs. the new Ibis Ripley what would you go with and why?

Thanks in advance.



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I would go Ibis because I’m not a fan of the current gen specialized FSR design.

I got to see the new Enduro out in SC today and it looked really nice. Would be interested to see how it rides.
 

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I would go Ibis because I'm not a fan of the current gen specialized FSR design.
Agreed. I have not been on an ST but liked the Ripmo better than the regular Stumpy for everything that I ride.

If the new Ripley is like the Ripmo with less travel, then it is probably a great bike for everywhere you listed.

The only nitpick I might personally have is the seat angle may be too much of a good thing at that travel for tall lanky people like myself especially if I was on clipless pedals.

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Will ride the ripley in sc this wendesday----so no opinion yet. Did demo the ST and by biggest issue was a ton of pedal strikes ---the FSR is very active so you will no doubt use pedal mode more.

Another bike in the mix could be the Pivot Trail 429-----very similar to the Ripley but the seat tube angle is not as steep and it has DW like the ripley.
 

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I would go to the Ibis factory in SC, demo one on your favorite trails, then give them your credit card!


I love my original Rip LS on the trails you mentioned (although I don't ride Skeggs anymore); the only limiting factor is me. And Ibis is a great company with superb customer service.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Will ride the ripley in sc this wendesday----so no opinion yet. Did demo the ST and by biggest issue was a ton of pedal strikes ---the FSR is very active so you will no doubt use pedal mode more.

Another bike in the mix could be the Pivot Trail 429-----very similar to the Ripley but the seat tube angle is not as steep and it has DW like the ripley.
Interested in your feedback! Do me a favor and share your thoughts later in the week.

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Note I emailed IBIS late last week and could demo the ripley tuesday or wednesday this coming week-----I was surprised it was this quick-weekends probably an issue---$40 to ride from 10-4 and you could ride wilder from the factory-just 2 miles up the bike path---no better way to get info
 

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What aspect don't you like?
The fact that I was riding a 160mm 29er with a coil and was still getting kicked around in the rough stuff. I tried so many different suspension set ups, and it never felt good. I would get on other peoples' bikes and would like them better. Rode it for 9 months, invested so much money in it, and never once said, "I love this bike". It may work if you are just hitting up demo/uc for casual laps, but I wanted a bike that I could compete for Cat1 Enduro wins and be confident on. There is a reason their factory riders used a completely different link. (And still sucked on it).
 

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Looking to pick up a single trail bike to cover NorCal trails (UC/Demo/JNT/Skeggs).

Between the Stumpy ST vs. the new Ibis Ripley what would you go with and why?

Thanks in advance.

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The previous generation of the Stumpjumper and the Ripley, not quite there. I mean they were ok but something like the Evil Following showed what's possible.

In the current iteration, both are good. 120/130 travel with long reach, slack head and steep seat.

The key differences will be in components and suspension quality. And company core values are very different too.

As far as suspension, the the Stumpjumper is more plush. It's the classic 4-link fsr and it works well in the rough. Pedaling, it's ok but it's not racy. It tends to sag under heavy power (and in fire road). I think they put 170mm cranks so it you don't keep hitting the cranks in tech terrain.

The new Ripley is like the baby Ripmo in stature. It's long and low and you can put a 180mm dropper post if you want. It's quick, agile and responsive to the pedal. It is kind of harsh and poppy when I tested it. That means you will launch on the little jumps but you better land smoothly. It has a DPS rear shocka and it will probably smooth out with a DPX2 rear shock.

Ripmo is lighter and it has better components. Shimano, Bikeyoke dropper, Schwalbe tires are all better than the matching Specialized offerings.

Specialized has the SWAT frame storage so go for that if you love it. If not, it adds weight. And finally, this is not really the Stumpjumper's wheelhouse. It's kind of a reach. It keepes a buyer in the Stumpy family but with compromises.

Or just win the Ripley here: https://reviews.mtbr.com/support-mbosc-win-an-ibis
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The previous generation of the Stumpjumper and the Ripley, not quite there. I mean they were ok but something like the Evil Following showed what's possible.

In the current iteration, both are good. 120/130 travel with long reach, slack head and steep seat.

The key differences will be in components and suspension quality. And company core values are very different too.

As far as suspension, the the Stumpjumper is more plush. It's the classic 4-link fsr and it works well in the rough. Pedaling, it's ok but it's not racy. It tends to sag under heavy power (and in fire road). I think they put 170mm cranks so it you don't keep hitting the cranks in tech terrain.

The new Ripley is like the baby Ripmo in stature. It's long and low and you can put a 180mm dropper post if you want. It's quick, agile and responsive to the pedal. It is kind of harsh and poppy when I tested it. That means you will launch on the little jumps but you better land smoothly. It has a DPS rear shocka and it will probably smooth out with a DPX2 rear shock.

Ripmo is lighter and it has better components. Shimano, Bikeyoke dropper, Schwalbe tires are all better than the matching Specialized offerings.

Specialized has the SWAT frame storage so go for that if you love it. If not, it adds weight. And finally, this is not really the Stumpjumper's wheelhouse. It's kind of a reach. It keepes a buyer in the Stumpy family but with compromises.

Or just win the Ripley here: https://reviews.mtbr.com/support-mbosc-win-an-ibis
Great feedback and this definitely helps clarify this bike segment.

In parallel while I work on getting the household CFO to approve, I'll be looking to demo the new Ibis Ripley, Pivot Trail 429 and Stumpy ST for good measure.

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