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I've got Hayes Sole hydraulic brakes on my Stumpjumper and the rear brakes glaze everytime that I ride. I've tried soaking the pads in alcohol, drying them then sanding the glaze off. I've tried just sanding them. I've bought new pads all with the same result....squealing brakes.

When I ride downhill, the brakes squeal when I first apply them so I let off and re-apply which seems to work. The other problem is that they fade badly on long downhill sections to the point where I've got very little brake left until they cool. My rear rotor is blued and discolored and shows overheating. It doesn't appear to be warped, just overheated.

I'm 220lbs and wondering if the Sole wasn't maybe intended for a lighter rider and for riding on flatter ground. If I'm doing something wrong, let me know, if I need to change out the brakes what would you recommend?
 

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Your pad and/or rotor could be contaminated. Soaking them in alcohol nis not enough. Most Manuf. recommend replacing the pads but there are numerous schemes for de-contaminating pads (baking them, flaming them, putting them in the dishwasher) you can do a search. Or you can just replace the pads and rotors (if you have "blued the rotors you are getting close to the tempering temperature of a lot of stainless alloys) While replacing pads and rotor is somewhat expensive it is a fraction of the cost of replacing the brake. Be sure to properly break-in the new pad and rotor before exposing it to heavy sustained braking (take it easy during break-in)

If this fails to solve your problem you may be over the top of the brakes capability (or have a riding style that is hard on (biased to) the rear brake) In this case you can either change your style (more bias to the front brake) or get a larger rotor (and adaptor) or a new caliper and (a larger) rotor.
 

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The brakes shouldn't be the problem. A blue rotor means it's getting too hot.

Switching to 8" rotors helps, as the bigger rotor runs cooler. Adjusting your braking style to use the front brake a lot more and the rear brake a lot less helps -- on steep downhills, you get about 3/4 of your braking power from the front brake. Getting your brakes bled with high-temperature brake fluid helps too (I run Motul RBF600, available at some motorcycle or auto parts stores).
 
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