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Discussion Starter #5
Interested. What can you compare them to?

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I can compare them to Saint and XT. With the stock pads they are similar power for the same lever squeeze.

With the metallic pads fitted they scare people who normally ride Saint and XT.
 

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Sounds fantastic, everything I want in a brake. As with everything though the judgement shall wait until it's reliability is known.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sounds fantastic, everything I want in a brake. As with everything though the judgement shall wait until it's reliability is known.
Lifetime leak proof warranty:
http://www.hayesdiscbrake.com/support/

My original hayes mags (2000) are still working. The rear has slow fluid loss somewhere. Probably should replace the hose.
I regularly ride my 2006 HFX Nine (split clamp version). In 12 years I haven't actually bled the back brake. The front has had new pads twice and rotor change once. It was bled with those pad changes.
I've been on Hayes Prime Feb 2015 to Dec 2017 and they've been rock solid with no maintenance in 3 years. Still in use.
But they don't have the power or lever feel the Dominion has.
 

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The key think for me in regards to disc brakes are 1) how easy are they to set up; 2) how trouble free are they; 3) how easy are they do simple maintenance on; 4) and how much do they cost?

XT brakes are cheap, are ridiculously easy to set up, are trouble free and dead easy to do simple maintenance on.

From the review, it looks like 1 looks to be a good. Will need to see how 2 -4 play out. The cross-hair feature seems fantastic.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The key think for me in regards to disc brakes are 1) how easy are they to set up; 2) how trouble free are they; 3) how easy are they do simple maintenance on; 4) and how much do they cost?

XT brakes are cheap, are ridiculously easy to set up, are trouble free and dead easy to do simple maintenance on.
All those boxes are ticked. Except the performance is even better. Especially at the extreme end as DOT fluid doesn't gas out when it gets hot. So they don't need regular bleeding.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bc3LcT0lxW9/?taken-by=shockcraftsuspension

*edit*
RRP on the Dominion is $US230 per end plus rotors/adapters. The new rotor is $US50.
 

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Looking to replace my formulas for a new build and soon. Anybody know how much the sintered pads will cost? And when are they available?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Looking to replace my formulas for a new build and soon. Anybody know how much the sintered pads will cost? And when are they available?
They come with two sets of pads. Semi-metallic and sintered metallic. The semi-metallic is on par with the best brakes out there. The sintered metallic will scare most riders.

I'll should have shipping info when everyone gets back from Eurobike.
 

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The grub screws on the caliper is pretty trick.
Yes, it's not guesswork, but it is a nuisance aligning the caliper. Honestly the main trouble comes from untrue rotors, but I'm glad to see the grub screws anyway.

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One thing I don't understand:

On Shimano brakes the reservoir sits on top of the piston cylinder. In practice that means that if there is any air in the system it will find its way up into the reservoir and the brake will work perfectly.

On this new brake the reservoir is underneath the cylinder. With the cylinder the highest part of the system, any air will stay there and you've got mushy brakes.

Am I missing something here as it seems like a fairly big oversight?
 

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Based on the cutaway view and the shape of some dials/levers, these look pretty similar to some '07 Code's I have. I'm slowly in the process of rebuilding them, but they were phenomenal brakes and will be used for a long time.

I'm very excited to try these Dominions!!! My old trek 8500LT (2000 era) had the Hayes brakes on them, and they rocked it for 8 years with some serious neglect. Shame I wasn't as into cycling when they finally stopped working, those 22mm mount calipers are frequently asked for now.
 

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One thing I don't understand:

On Shimano brakes the reservoir sits on top of the piston cylinder. In practice that means that if there is any air in the system it will find its way up into the reservoir and the brake will work perfectly.

On this new brake the reservoir is underneath the cylinder. With the cylinder the highest part of the system, any air will stay there and you've got mushy brakes.

Am I missing something here as it seems like a fairly big oversight?
They did say they can be flipped to work on either side 🤔
 

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They did say they can be flipped to work on either side 樂
That might be why they've designed it that way. By making the lever symmetrical the end user can put them on either side and Hayes cut costs by not having to make left and right levers!

Shimano levers are less elegant looking than many, due to that lump of a reservoir sitting on top of the lever, but they have reasons for it and it contributes to the ease of use and reliability of the brakes. In use, the brakes will 'self-bleed' and are very tolerant of air in the system. You can run the brakes with air in them for years and no experience any ill effects. Contrast that with Avid brakes, which had a tiny reservoir and were a total pain.

On these new Hayes brakes the highest point in the system is here, were I've put the arrow, exactly were you do not want it. Sure, you can flip the levers but I'd rather have a brake that can tolerate an imperfect bleed and still function.

p4pb16077149.jpg

Like I said, maybe I'm missing something? I'm happy to be corrected but to be it seems to me like they've sacrificed reliability to save money and make a nicer looking lever.
 

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That might be why they've designed it that way. By making the lever symmetrical the end user can put them on either side and Hayes cut costs by not having to make left and right levers!

Shimano levers are less elegant looking than many, due to that lump of a reservoir sitting on top of the lever, but they have reasons for it and it contributes to the ease of use and reliability of the brakes. In use, the brakes will 'self-bleed' and are very tolerant of air in the system. You can run the brakes with air in them for years and no experience any ill effects. Contrast that with Avid brakes, which had a tiny reservoir and were a total pain.

On these new Hayes brakes the highest point in the system is here, were I've put the arrow, exactly were you do not want it. Sure, you can flip the levers but I'd rather have a brake that can tolerate an imperfect bleed and still function.

View attachment 1207445

Like I said, maybe I'm missing something? I'm happy to be corrected but to be it seems to me like they've sacrificed reliability to save money and make a nicer looking lever.
I think you're over thinking this. If any company knows about disc brakes, it's Hayes. I think they invented the mountain bike disc brake. It's a cutaway that's shown also, so maybe some part of reservoir is still at the high point.
 

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I really hope these will be nice. Based on what I have read so far, they do look promising and a good fit for me.

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