Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 115 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My original wheel builder fell through (don’t ask) and I’m now looking at other options.

The shop building up my bike is getting a set of the 29” Zipp 3zero Motos on Thursday and they are mine if I want them.

Ive seen the videos, and read the comments from the armchair engineers, but what Id really like to hear form people who have actually ridden them.

Any experience out there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Well, looks like I'm one of the first. My bike isn't complete yet as we are still waiting on a dropper post. But the Zipp 3zero Motos came in and they look pretty cool.

The rims "feel" very similar weights to the Enves they had on for mock up while building the bike.

The profiles are so very different. Visually the difference is instantly apparent. The Zips look sort of like an aluminum rim done in carbon.

The felt plenty stiff in my hands, but that is meaningless. I'm hoping to get out and ride them this weekend.

The hubs are on the noisy side, but not obnoxious, just not quiet.

I personally really like the unique carbon weave. While not up to supercar standards, it looks to be well done.

Bicycle tire Wheel Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle part Bicycle frame


Automotive tire Bicycle tire Rim Synthetic rubber Tread


Automotive tire Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle tire Rim Spoke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,913 Posts
are you a roadie? I am curious what drew you to these. previous experience with Zipp on a road bike is my first guess. that appearance is unique, but I'm sure it is a veneer; top layer only, if you prefer.

I have not researched them extensively but one look at the weight and price made me look elsewhere. there are many wheels and rims either lighter or cheaper, and some that are both.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Never been a roadie.

I’m not sold on the weight issue at these tiny differences. Here’s a great quote from Bike Radar:

“For a system weight (bike and rider) of 100kg, you’d need at least a 500g difference in combined rim weight to make a 1 percent difference to acceleration”

Similarly priced carbon rims from premier name brands (some cost a little less, some cost much more):

Enve (1789 gm)
Ibis (1690-1748 gm)
SC Reserve (1811 gm)
We_Are_One Agent (1803)

In real world riding most of these come close enough to the Zipp 3zero Moto rims (1910 gm). The difference in weights in your tire choice are often higher. Especially if you want durability and compliance.

Running double down casings and cushcore to stop pinch flats likely adds as much or more weight than the difference in the wheels.

Most of the above mentioned rims would be over the Zipp weight if you had to include Cushcore (260 gm) to get the protection and dampening (compliance) offered by rims like the Zipp 3zero Moto (1910 gm) and the Crank Bros Synthesis (1829 gm) offer.

The Crank Bros Synthesis were also a rim I was interested in, but they were even more expensive.

I’ve done the super rigid carbons before. My last bike (Ibis HD3) had a an aluminum rim on it (Ibis 738), and I frankly loved the way those felt. I’m hoping the Zips feel like more like the aluminum rims but have the strength of the carbon hoops.

Hey, if no one tries the new ideas, there will be no new ideas.

If I find I prefer the ride and carry a few hundred grams, I’m happy.
If I find I don’t have to run inserts and or double down casings there might not even be a weight penalty

Ride report when I get some miles on them
 

·
This place needs an enema
Joined
·
17,091 Posts
there are many wheels and rims either lighter or cheaper, and some that are both.
You write that as if weight and cost are the most important metrics to consider with wheels.

They are 2 of the top 5, but not the top 2.

I'd love to try these Zipp's. Eventually I will.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You write that as if weight and cost are the most important metrics to consider with wheels.

They are 2 of the top 5, but not the top 2.

I'd love to try these Zipp's. Eventually I will.
I agree 100% with your comment.

On my most recent build I went SRAM AXS XX1 to save the weight. I felt that made sense and for my riding there was no downside having the weight removed there.

For the wheels, I really wanted more feel and compliance. Especially since I was moving from an aluminum wheeled 27.5 to my first 29er.

I'm interested in this idea of the tire, wheel, fork being considered a holistic suspension and dampening system.

I personally think there will be a lot of new developments in this "system" over the next few years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,913 Posts
You write that as if weight and cost are the most important metrics to consider with wheels.

They are 2 of the top 5, but not the top 2.

I'd love to try these Zipp's. Eventually I will.
Sure. Another one is durability which we can't ever truly know except for a) user feedback and we know some riders are harsher than others, and some riders don't put much air in their tires, and

b) warranty.

These do have a lifetime warranty. AFAIK Santa Cruz was first to market with that (June 2017) and I'm thrilled other brands are following suit. And I say this as a person who has never broken a rim of any kind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Correct, it’s hard to measure the durability without a really large sample base. The anecdotal evidence of a few riders isn’t going to give a lot of insight because there are so many variables.

The fact these have already podiumed with top riders is a good sign. Top tier riders likely put more stress on a wheel in one run than I might in a whole season :)

Plus they are heavily warrantied and my local bike shop carries them. So I’m hoping if I have an issue, it can be taken care of.

I’ll let you guys know what I think once I get a few miles on them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,729 Posts
Looking forward to your feedback.

I like your thinking re: "I'm interested in this idea of the tire, wheel, fork being considered a holistic suspension and dampening system.

I personally think there will be a lot of new developments in this "system" over the next few years."


I'd expand this to include the frame itself - I remember that when Dave Turner released his first carbon frame (Czar 29er XC bike), he spend a lot of time getting the stiffness he wanted in the direction he wanted (i think it was front-back).

Members on another site (whose name starts with P) often state that they're happier with traditional carbon rims on alu frames than carbon frames.

I'm excited buy the current trends re: carbon rims
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah these guys are looking at the whole bike as a suspension system, by integrating the front and rear suspensions as an integral part of the frame design, not a bolt on.

Very curious to see how they ride.

https://structure.bike/

Looking forward to your feedback.

I like your thinking re: "I'm interested in this idea of the tire, wheel, fork being considered a holistic suspension and dampening system.

I personally think there will be a lot of new developments in this "system" over the next few years."


I'd expand this to include the frame itself - I remember that when Dave Turner released his first carbon frame (Czar 29er XC bike), he spend a lot of time getting the stiffness he wanted in the direction he wanted (i think it was front-back).

Members on another site (whose name starts with P) often state that they're happier with traditional carbon rims on alu frames than carbon frames.

I'm excited buy the current trends re: carbon rims
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have 9 or so rides on these rims and I’m loving them so far.

This Ripmo is my first 29” build, I’m filming from 27.5” Ibis HD3. So I don't have a lot of experience on this wheel size. My Ibis HD3 had a set of the ibis 738 aluminum rims, my Fatbike was aSalsa Carbon Bucksaw had a set of 26” Whiskey carbon rims with a set of 4” tires.

My thoughts:
At first the 29” wheels felt strange, but I quickly got over that. What I have noticed is the obvious increase in roll over. My speeds seemed to increase and frankly I have been able to just bomb through the rocks and rock gardens on my local trails. Some of that is down to the wheel size, but some might be the rims.

The bike is beautifully compliant (suspension dialled in with ShockWiz). It’s just feels connected to the trail and steady. No harshness, no buzzing in my hands, no surprises. The steering is perfect and I get a sense of what is happening underneath my wheels.

I ride a lot of Canadian Shield, likely similar to North Eastern USA. A third of the time I’m riding trails that are at least a third rock plus roots. These trails are murder on rims and mine still look fantastic and are staying true.

For my type of riding these seem to be really working out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I dont have a lot to say and thats likely a good thing. They engage quickly, even in technical terrain and rocks. I never find my self looking for more of a direct connection.

They aren’t quiet, but they wont likely be the loudest hubs on any trail
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
666 Posts
Just noticed something interesting while researching these wheels. From the user manual pdf:

Max Recommended System Weight (Bike, Rider, and Equipment): 250 lbs / 120 kg

Say you have a slim build of a bike at 30lbs, your carrying 2L of water at 4.2lbs, your trail essentials ring in at 5lbs (food, maint and repair), then your riding gear adds another 5lbs. that would make the max rider weight 205lbs to stay within Zipps recommendations. seems like a low upper limit....i know a boat load of non fat dudes that hit that mark easily.

https://www.zipp.com/static/pdf/95-1918-026-000_User_Manual_Zipp_MTB_Wheels_Rev_A.pdf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Just built up a 29” set laced to original Onyx hubs.

One thing I can comment on is that the rim is definitely flexible! Before lacing the wheel, I flexed the hoop by hand and it deformed a shocking amount. Compared to a box section rim, the radial and torsional flex was night and day.

The build up on these was a bit more involved than I’m used to with carbon rims. Definitely feels more like building an alloy rim. With a stiff box section rim, its nearly impossible to even get the rim to go out of true, whereas if you get sloppy with your assembly, the 3motos will happily go wildly out of true. They’re no harder to build up than an alloy rim, but they’re just not immediately and always straight like most carbon hoops I’ve worked with.

More updates to come once I get them on my bike and log some miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Looking forward to hearing your thoughts on these once you have a few rides.

I love mine, but I haven’t ridden this bike with other rims, nor have I ridden another 29 er. What I can say is my Ripmo feels precise, easy to keep on course and rarely if ever punishing. How much of that is these rims or the platform, hard to say.

But, wheels stay true, tires stay inflated and I keep loving the way it goes through whatever I point it through.
 

·
mbtr member
Joined
·
6,503 Posts
Just noticed something interesting while researching these wheels. From the user manual pdf:

Max Recommended System Weight (Bike, Rider, and Equipment): 250 lbs / 120 kg

Say you have a slim build of a bike at 30lbs, your carrying 2L of water at 4.2lbs, your trail essentials ring in at 5lbs (food, maint and repair), then your riding gear adds another 5lbs. that would make the max rider weight 205lbs to stay within Zipps recommendations. seems like a low upper limit....i know a boat load of non fat dudes that hit that mark easily.

https://www.zipp.com/static/pdf/95-1918-026-000_User_Manual_Zipp_MTB_Wheels_Rev_A.pdf
I exceed the weight limit for these rims. Thank you! I know that i'm too heavy for some bike parts to work effectively, and it sucks to figure that out firsthand. Kudos to zipp for identifying their target rider and making a product specifically for them.
 

·
Hoolie Ghoulie on Strava.
Ripmo
Joined
·
3,456 Posts
Thanks for the reviews everyone. Great info so far. I really like these rims. Edit:I like these rims but have not tried them yet. I hope I can demo a set, Wrenchsience bike shop has alot of Zipp wheels go through that shop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Just got done with my first ride on the Zipp rims, and my initial impression is good! I rode four lift served bike park laps that had a good mix of flow/jump trail, rock gardens, loose blown out trail, and some regular intermediate trail riding.

When just riding along, I noticed a slight reduction in the vibration and buzz transmitted through the bike. This effect was subtle, possibly because I’m running heavy Double Down casing tires. It’ll be interesting to ride them with lighter trail tires.

In rock gardens, things definitely felt less harsh, and more under control than my previous wheels. I suspect these are going to be the ticket for blasting through chunky rocky sections at high speed. The “ankle effect” was particularly noticable when I’d hit a rock at an angle but not be deflected as much as I’m used to.

I did manage to jump 20’ and land with my rear tire directly on a jagged rock, and as far as I can tell, the tire didn’t bottom out on the rim, a bit to my surprise. I’m kind of thinking that might have been a pinch on another wheel setup. More time and similar impacts required to determine if they actually do cut down on pinch flats.

To be clear, the difference was subtle, and most of the time they felt mostly like a nice wheel, but nothing crazy. But they do really seem to shine when it comes to off camber impacts like you frequently encounter in a rock garden.

Edit: second ride update. These rims really are something special. I spent a good portion of this ride intentionally deciding to hit rocks at an angle, and the difference in deflection was noticeable. Rocky sections are less jarring, especially so when on edge and railing a chunky corner. These rims really do seem to have a magic carpet effect to them. I also smacked the rear hard again, this time to the point that I heard the rim strike. No pinch, I’m stoked. I think I’m gonna wind up fanatically in love with these wheels.
 
1 - 20 of 115 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top