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I have the Park one and while works well, it's also a huge pain in the ass on MY bikes since all I have is plus and fat. It probably was designed for skinny tire bikes where the tire doesn't balloon out past the rim.

I am also going to buy the wolftooth tool.
 

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I don't see how the tire has anything to do with it...you use the rim as a point of reference.

If you are concerned with saving weight/space above all else, then yes, the Wolftooth tool will probably be fine. If you are looking for speed, the classic design is better, hence why it is used in shops.
 

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I have the Park one and while works well, it's also a huge pain in the ass on MY bikes since all I have is plus and fat. It probably was designed for skinny tire bikes where the tire doesn't balloon out past the rim.

I am also going to buy the wolftooth tool.
Do you have the first version or the 2nd version?
 

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I like the wolftooth one for its portability, but I do not own it. I can't really fathom a situation where I personally would be in that I would need it. But if/when I can do those rides, I would like this in my kit
 

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I have the Park one and while works well, it's also a huge pain in the ass on MY bikes since all I have is plus and fat. It probably was designed for skinny tire bikes where the tire doesn't balloon out past the rim..
It works the same on all wheels with tires installed. The indicator runs into the tire when you swing the arm since it pivots on the RD mounting point which is not concentric with the wheel axle. The Park tool comes with o-rings on the indicator to set the position so you can pull it out, rotate the arm, reposition the indicator radially and push the indicator in to the same position. I find zip ties work better than the o-rings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have the Park one and while works well, it's also a huge pain in the ass on MY bikes since all I have is plus and fat. It probably was designed for skinny tire bikes where the tire doesn't balloon out past the rim.

I am also going to buy the wolftooth tool.
That's why I'm interested in it.
 

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The only reason why you'd choose the Wolftooth one is to throw it in your pack. You'll get more leverage and finer adjustment for the larger tool eg, Park or Abbey.

That said I made my own version of the Wolftooth, using an old quick release axle (not skewer but the threaded axle that the skewer runs through) which threads nicely into the derailleur hanger. And use the the thru axle out of my wheel as reference.
 

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Plays with tools
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Thanks for the love!

Couple of thoughts about hanger alignment and the tools to do it.

Precision is king, with modern drivetrains the hangers need to be pretty damn straight, less than 2mm honestly. You're simply not going to do that with a tool that has a bunch of play or something that requires you to eyeball it. Honestly, if you're not going to get a precise tool you are better of just using an adjustable wrench and getting it good enough.

The rotating head is nice but certainty not mandatory. It really comes in handy when you're working on bikes with racks and/or fenders where there's lots of stuff in the way.

A locking indicator is pretty nice as it keeps you from second guessing your measurement. Don't try to move the indicator out and back in to what you think is the same spot. It's not going to be the same and your results will suffer.

The rear derailleur thread is one of 3 things that are truly standardized on the bicycle (bottle boss spacing and chain pitch being the other two). Introducing other variables into this process could lead to tools that are more likely to become obsolete or need additional parts to maintain compatibility. Something to think about in this ever evolving world of wheel sizes, axle spacing and axle threading.

Finally, an extremely strong majority of factory techs for drivetrain manufactures use our HAG. This includes Shimano who make their own tool! If that doesn't convince you what's more trusted I don't know what else will.
 

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From what I can see, the Park and Abbey work in the same way and do exactly the same thing? If you work in a shop, fair enough, but for the most part I don't really see how big a difference it's going to make whichever tool you have. I have the Park one, it gets the job done fine.
 

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From what I can see, the Park and Abbey work in the same way and do exactly the same thing? If you work in a shop, fair enough, but for the most part I don't really see how big a difference it's going to make whichever tool you have. I have the Park one, it gets the job done fine.
Some people ride X5 and think it's awesome, other people ride XX1. In pictures they pretty much look exactly the same.

Pictures don't do it justice, use the two tools back to back and you will quickly see the difference. Weather that difference is worth good money is up to you.
 

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SHoeWeee HAG @ 185 yikes... it beautiful green and everything!
I have a home made one made out of square stock, it works but have been thinking of getting something "less clumsy"... I love precision tools but man...
 
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