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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bought this hand chainsaw on ebay a month or so back for $10.

What an awesome little pocket tool. You can just clip it too ya bike and if you come across any branch down on the trail cut it out of the way.

Its light, packs down to nothing, 2 dudes can cut through a log as thick as your leg in a bout 5 minutes.

definately a very worthy purchase. Particularly if you are on trails that have windfall or generally need sporadic maintenance as you are riding along.

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those are handy. I keep one in my work truck if I have to cut roots away from broken pipes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Out of curiosity, how long do you think it would take to saw someone in half? Asking for a friend.
Maybe freeze them first. Then yourl have something solid to cut through. Do you and another serial killer handy to operate the other half of the saw? That will half the cutting time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My 10" Corona looks easier to use, though bigger. It still fits in a pack.
Yeah, but you snap your spine if you crash hard on a 10" blade. The beauty of the hand chainsaw is that it can be clipped on the bike and just say there.

Your not going to take a 10" blade on every ride are you?
 

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I'm sorry, but I can't imagine it being 1/4 as fast as a handsaw with a thin sharp blade. But I do agree on the ease of transport. I bought an 20v cordless electric black&decker chainsaw along with some other 20v tools at a pawn shop (the hedge trimmer is nearly magical for trail maint), the chainsaw is virtually worthless on anything but half rotten logs, it's not worth carrying into the woods, a good sharp axe is 10x as fast on anything. Consider the width/volume of wood you're removing, and the energy it takes to remove that material with wide chain-teeth. Removing a narrower width of material is going to take a lot less energy. Chainsaws work because you've got a really substantial powerhead.
Even the 8" folding saw from harbor freight is quite good, it easily straps to the seatpost, or will ride safely in your pack. I've cut through 4" dry madrona/arbutus with that in a short amount of time, the electric chainsaw chokes on small Madrona, and you guys don't make more power than the 20v elec chainsaw.
 

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I'm sorry, but I can't imagine it being 1/4 as fast as a handsaw with a thin sharp blade.
You will have to try it before you knock it. I've made quick work of some thick tree branches with mine. More importantly, as you pointed out, I was able to stop and do this trail maintenance during a ride when there was no way I was going to go flying through the woods with a equivalently powerful saw in my pocket. I admit my 18" bow saw is much more useful, but there's no way to carry it unless I am walking the trail just to do maintenance.
 

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I have not use a manual chain saw and they may be totally awesome, but pruning saws can be f'ing amazing. I got a little folder with a 4.5" blade that I carry and have cut through 2" hardwood limbs pretty damn quickly and easily. I didn't realize how small it was until I just measured it.
 

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You will have to try it before you knock it. I've made quick work of some thick tree branches with mine. More importantly, as you pointed out, I was able to stop and do this trail maintenance during a ride when there was no way I was going to go flying through the woods with a equivalently powerful saw in my pocket. I admit my 18" bow saw is much more useful, but there's no way to carry it unless I am walking the trail just to do maintenance.
Sven Saw. I dressed a 20 foot branch (including attending smaller bits off of it) that fell off an oak above our patio, that would have been difficult/dangerous to do with a power saw in about 30 minutes. :tup:

The pocket chainsaws are pretty good for minor stuff, but as mentioned, it's best to put "T" handles on them. It doesn't muck up the packing too much, but it improves their use dramatically. Keep them sharp, too...in fact, even if it's new, sharpen it; when you have to do the work, every bit helps.
 

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I keep one of those in each of my cars. I drive a lot of back roads and have come across many down trees. the pocket chain saw does work when you need to cut down a larger tree. I also have a 40v electric chainsaw and 2-3 axes of various sizes and a small shovel that I carry when the weather is bad. needless to say, I come prepared, lol. I used to carry a small camping hatchet in my camelback once upon a time, never thought about carrying the pocket chainsaw.
 

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Yeah, but you snap your spine if you crash hard on a 10" blade. The beauty of the hand chainsaw is that it can be clipped on the bike and just say there.

Your not going to take a 10" blade on every ride are you?
I take my silky bigboy --on every ride--. even road rides 'cuz I like keeping an identical configured camelbak on all missions. use it about once every 20 rides except spring where all I am doing is sawing big crap

them rollup chains...meh, too much effort for little gainz. silky...portable lumber mill
 
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