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noMAD man
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Just throwing this out for discussion, but isn't the rear triangle...especially at the lower stays...the most impact and failure prone part of a bike frame? With carbon I'm somewhat more concerned with impact issues, and the smaller diameter stay area that exists on most bike designs seems more susceptible to damage. If I were to have a hybrid carbon/aluminum frame, I think I'd rather have the mainframe made out of carbon. Overall I guess I just like plain ol' aluminum.
 

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hands up who wants to die
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TNC: since it's his slopestyle bike, he probably isn't riding it in the woods and smashing into rocks and branches too much. As a pro, he'll have a full quiver of other SC bikes for that purpose. I'm also thinking a catastrophic failure of the front triangle would be a lot more dangerous than a snapped chainstay.

Anyhow, I think it looks like an ugly hack-job myself (mismatched triangles; slammed seat on the curved top tube and chopped seat tube). Just my $.02.
 

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If anything it shows just how much the LT can handle. It just made my decision a little bit easier that's for sure.

Everything about his set up is functional. He may have other bikes but i think you may have a little misgiving about what sponsorship will often entail. The point is i think that his setup is made out of parts that you or I could walk into a shop and purchase for the most part.

That to me speaks volumes about the product and the guy.
 

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sponsorship for the big freeriders means they get a frame or two kicked to them, if they're good enough travel expenses, and comp winnings. They don't make much in a year. Enough to get by for the best of them, but they're not getting bikes and parts tossed at them all day, thats for the heavy hitting factory race teams.
 

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He states in the video that the aluminum front is used so he can cut down the seat tube, so the seat can be as low as he likes it for bracing his knees.
Or something close to that!
 

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Propr
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1,192 Posts
not sure...if CF really that stiff when it comes to frames?

i rode an ibis and it felt very loose side to side...always thought there was a softness to CF like with the bars providing some damping compared to aluminum???
 

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The ibis without the Lopes link did suffer from Lateral stiffness due to the two part link system utilised in the suspension system.

The thing about carbon is that you can engineer it for lots of things (vertical compliance for one as seen in alu road bikes with carbon stays and carbon road bikes in general) and I don't doubt that SC has done their home work in regard to the frames lateral rigidity. That and if Jamie Goldman and Kurt Voreis are flogging the crap out of them on the freeride side of the sport speaks volumes about the product.

Carbon will take over aluminium as the material of choice for bike frame manufacture in years to come as the material is more widely accepted. You only have to look at companies like GT, IBIS and SC for pushing this material to the forefront of the market.

GT, ran a carbon framed DH bike all year. Now if that doesn't convince you then surely Brian Lopes on Ibis would be enough. He has been around for long enough to know what works and what doesn't. Can't argue with all those years of experience.
 

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hands up who wants to die
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Can't argue with all that paycheck.

Lopes is a semi-retired gated racing specialist who (like most pros) chooses sponsors based on level of support (ie money). I'm not sure what his frame sponsor really has to do with a discussion of a prototype Santa Cruz slopestyle frame.
 

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Propr
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rpet said:
Can't argue with all that paycheck.

Lopes is a semi-retired gated racing specialist who (like most pros) chooses sponsors based on level of support (ie money). I'm not sure what his frame sponsor really has to do with a discussion of a prototype Santa Cruz slopestyle frame.
think we were talking about stiffness of carbon frames and I mentioned Ibis and how I rode one and it felt like a wet noodle side-to-side.

i'm sure SC has it dialed in for JG :thumbsup: and I think Damienp cleared it up pretty nicely.
 

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Trail Junkie
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There has been some tests and SC says that the LT is the strongest frame they ever built (this was before the release of the Nomad C or the V10 C) That is saying a lot, and they elaborated on the rear chainstays look were huge. I am pretty sure there is an interview on Youtube for it. Also it says a lot about the bike, not just the rider that he chose the BLT over say... the Chameleon for a DJ rig. It obviously is a system that is working and offers him some versatility that he didn't have in a normal DJ rig. As for not using a Carbon front, it was probably suggested from SC to use the aluminum since when you cut Carbon Fiber, you are breaking a weave and cracking the edges of the resin which can promote future stress fractures in the area. Aluminum does not have those characteristics being metal.
 

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dubdryver said:
There has been some tests and SC says that the LT is the strongest frame they ever built (this was before the release of the Nomad C or the V10 C) That is saying a lot, and they elaborated on the rear chainstays look were huge. I am pretty sure there is an interview on Youtube for it. Also it says a lot about the bike, not just the rider that he chose the BLT over say... the Chameleon for a DJ rig. It obviously is a system that is working and offers him some versatility that he didn't have in a normal DJ rig. As for not using a Carbon front, it was probably suggested from SC to use the aluminum since when you cut Carbon Fiber, you are breaking a weave and cracking the edges of the resin which can promote future stress fractures in the area. Aluminum does not have those characteristics being metal.
Actually, aluminum does have the characteristic, but it's softer so cracks don't start easily but once they do, same thing.

Also, typically on a bicycle the outer layers are sacrificial - not structural. This is, of course, because they know the bike will get a few scuffs here and there. A good example might be the filament wound tubes you don't see very often anymore. That cool pattern on them was where they ground the OD and all of the fibers on the OD were broken but it was OK because they were just there to look pretty at that point.

Last - most of the stuff these days is unidirectional fiber in layers, not weave. Most of that "classic 3-d" weave you see is just to pretty up the product because most people expect to see a weave.

Ok, that's it :)
 
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