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Question for those who have used it, how quickly does it shift, especially upshift? One thing I miss about my Shimano 11sp is being able to fire off two gears at a time when you drop into a fast bit of trail and the speed rapidly increases. I'm not much slower with my GX eagle now I'm used to it, but I still slightly miss being able to do that with the Shimano.
 

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Question for those who have used it, how quickly does it shift, especially upshift? One thing I miss about my Shimano 11sp is being able to fire off two gears at a time when you drop into a fast bit of trail and the speed rapidly increases. I'm not much slower with my GX eagle now I'm used to it, but I still slightly miss being able to do that with the Shimano.
It’s very quick to shift both directions. You can program the controller to move one gear at a time, three gears at a time, or all gears if you hold down on the paddle.

The paddles take a little while to learn because it’s not the same two-paddle arrangement that we’ve gotten used to for the past fifteen or so years. However, you can program which direction causes what effect, and there’s an optional ergonomic paddle that more closely mimics the double thumb shifter. I used to have Grip Shift way back in the day so once I realized that the stock paddle works in the same motion as Grip Shift (roll back to downshift and roll forward to upshift) it was easy to recall the muscle memory. There’s an almost-hidden mini paddle underneath that you can tap with your index finger like a trigger.

I’m fastest when I tap the paddle in rapid succession (e.g., bump-bump-bump with my thumb or trigger finger, and the chain shifts three gears immediately bang-bang-bang).
 

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Question for those who have used it, how quickly does it shift, especially upshift? One thing I miss about my Shimano 11sp is being able to fire off two gears at a time when you drop into a fast bit of trail and the speed rapidly increases. I'm not much slower with my GX eagle now I'm used to it, but I still slightly miss being able to do that with the Shimano.
It's pretty quick. I also love the double release/sprint feature. On AXS I find it's fastest to simply double or triple click the button instead of long hold. In a perfect world there would be a third button somewhere to act as a sprint key. Maybe in the next gen or if they release a left hand shifter with more than a single function. I feel that AXS is a lot faster than cable, though. And it never misses the shift. The hardest part about set up is realizing you don't need the controller to be in the normal spot because there isn't any lever throw to worry about; finding that perfect spot where you can just twitch a thumb to execute a shift takes a little time. I found the upgraded paddle to make this perfect. There's also a more defined ridge on the front so you can trigger it with your pointer finger, which I find works great in a sprint and feels more natural than any other system I've used.
 

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Has anyone had the b screw back it’s self out on the trail? First ride on my setup today and I was working my way down a vary technical section and all of a sudden the top pulley was riding on the cassette and the b screw was all the way out. I tightened it back down so the pulley was off the cassette and would shift. I didn’t have have to mess with it at all after that. But I definitely have to put it up on the stand and adjust it properly again.
 

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Has anyone had the b screw back it’s self out on the trail? First ride on my setup today and I was working my way down a vary technical section and all of a sudden the top pulley was riding on the cassette and the b screw was all the way out. I tightened it back down so the pulley was off the cassette and would shift. I didn’t have have to mess with it at all after that. But I definitely have to put it up on the stand and adjust it properly again.
Nope never had that happen to a SRAM derailleur. Make sure that the screw thread in the derailleur isn't damaged
 

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Local shop ordered(or was allotted 4) Took a week to sell all 4, although not in yet. I was the last one to put down a deposit. I told myself I would wait, but couldn't. They also sold 2 of 3 of the new Trail 429's, almost before they got them unboxed. Bike bizness is booming. My buddy is using my X01 stuff to upgrade from his NX, so I will defer some of the cost with beer.
 

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I looked at AXS for my Tallboy in Dec 2019. Did the test ride. Incredible shifting but was still left with "meh. why is this important?". My TB4 was built as a 1x12. So AXS eliminates 1 cable and cable housing. It also eliminates your ability to soft shift (i.e. unexpected climbs) and adds the weight/uncertainties of batteries. Regardless, I took a pass. How often do I really change cables--once a year? Do I really want to worry about having a full charge before every ride? Nah...

Then in Nov 2020 I was test riding gravel bikes. Rode AXS again and DI2. DI2 works just as well. However the bike is a 2x11 the battery would be in seat post and hard wired to each der. The shifters are wireless and each require a small hearing aide battery. This time though, DI2 ended up weighing 1.2 lbs more than a GRX build. Huh? Same bike. Same size. Weird math. Same voice in my head, is "wireless" shifting a noticeable advantage over cables? Nah...

Today, I regularly hear stories now about both systems' batteries not charging, won't hold a charge for as long as anticipated, and still perform flawlessly when they do work. For the cost, unknown lifecycle, and lack of apparent weight savings, AXS and DI2 are a hard pass.
 

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Both systems use steel case 7.4V Lithium Ion batteries. They're pretty reliable but duds do get sold. Easily solved under warranty
 

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I looked at AXS for my Tallboy in Dec 2019. Did the test ride. Incredible shifting but was still left with "meh. why is this important?". My TB4 was built as a 1x12. So AXS eliminates 1 cable and cable housing. It also eliminates your ability to soft shift (i.e. unexpected climbs) and adds the weight/uncertainties of batteries. Regardless, I took a pass. How often do I really change cables--once a year? Do I really want to worry about having a full charge before every ride? Nah...

Then in Nov 2020 I was test riding gravel bikes. Rode AXS again and DI2. DI2 works just as well. However the bike is a 2x11 the battery would be in seat post and hard wired to each der. The shifters are wireless and each require a small hearing aide battery. This time though, DI2 ended up weighing 1.2 lbs more than a GRX build. Huh? Same bike. Same size. Weird math. Same voice in my head, is "wireless" shifting a noticeable advantage over cables? Nah...

Today, I regularly hear stories now about both systems' batteries not charging, won't hold a charge for as long as anticipated, and still perform flawlessly when they do work. For the cost, unknown lifecycle, and lack of apparent weight savings, AXS and DI2 are a hard pass.
This is how I look at it too. I got a chance to ride my friend's AXS bike. As cool as it is to hear the servo when it shifts...it won't change the riding experience to my bike at the moment. I have a perfectly functioning X01 Eagle on my bike right now. I don't see the point of replacing it for the sake of doing it. Now if I was building up a new bike...then that might be a different story.
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
this is a great set of responses ; thanks

tells me there are stronge camps for mechanical and for electrical shifting
And that there is more interest in GX AXS than I expected ; so I probably under ordered those

GX AXS bikes are a bit pricy , so orders at those price points tend to be thinner than for lower priced mechanical Eagle bikes

anyone have an opinion on fair pricing on complete GX AXS FS bikes with say pike & XT brakes & nice wheels?
 

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I looked at AXS for my Tallboy in Dec 2019. Did the test ride. Incredible shifting but was still left with "meh. why is this important?". My TB4 was built as a 1x12. So AXS eliminates 1 cable and cable housing. It also eliminates your ability to soft shift (i.e. unexpected climbs) and adds the weight/uncertainties of batteries. Regardless, I took a pass. How often do I really change cables--once a year? Do I really want to worry about having a full charge before every ride? Nah...

Then in Nov 2020 I was test riding gravel bikes. Rode AXS again and DI2. DI2 works just as well. However the bike is a 2x11 the battery would be in seat post and hard wired to each der. The shifters are wireless and each require a small hearing aide battery. This time though, DI2 ended up weighing 1.2 lbs more than a GRX build. Huh? Same bike. Same size. Weird math. Same voice in my head, is "wireless" shifting a noticeable advantage over cables? Nah...

Today, I regularly hear stories now about both systems' batteries not charging, won't hold a charge for as long as anticipated, and still perform flawlessly when they do work. For the cost, unknown lifecycle, and lack of apparent weight savings, AXS and DI2 are a hard pass.
This is how I look at it too. I got a chance to ride my friend's AXS bike. As cool as it is to hear the servo when it shifts...it won't change the riding experience to my bike at the moment. I have a perfectly functioning X01 Eagle on my bike right now. I don't see the point of replacing it for the sake of doing it. Now if I was building up a new bike...then that might be a different story.
At the end of the day AXS is just another derailleur. It's still just the ungainly dangly thing that moves the chain up and down the cassette. But hey, it has an app![/QUOTE]
 

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I don't think this is a system I'd feel confident with on a multi day tour in a remote country. Of course you can pack extra batteries but I'd rather bring along another RD, hanger and cable. A pre cut loop of housing too now that I think about it since I watched a guy split the housing open in the middle of no where.
 

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I don't think this is a system I'd feel confident with on a multi day tour in a remote country. Of course you can pack extra batteries but I'd rather bring along another RD, hanger and cable. A pre cut loop of housing too now that I think about it since I watched a guy split the housing open in the middle of no where.
I don't think I'd rely on it for a multi-day backcountry excursion either. I don't do that kind of riding though. For a day ride the snappy performance is great.
 

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I went roadie for a year and used di2. I got a new mountain bike recently to get back into it. The bike was sweet but going back to cable shifting was actually pretty annoying. I immediately got the gx axs the day it came out. Night a day difference. So many advantages. I feel it should be top of the list of bike upgrades. I would rather charge a battery once a week then fiddle with stupid cables.
 

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Yeah, I have a feeling most people saying they wouldn't want it due to whatever reasons haven't actually used it. Or, they've read one negative thing and formed an opinion based on that.

I know a few people that have been using AXS since it first came out with zero issues. I can't beleive I'm saying this, but as I get older (lol) riding all day and shifting a lot makes my thumb a little sore from the cable resistance. There's none of that with AXS. For people with arthritis or hand issues, AXS is the perfect solution. Plus, no fiddling with cables or swapping them out...ever. How is that NOT awesome?! Sure, $600 is a bit pricey (and it will come down just like the other AXS setups did), but IMHO it seriously worth the cost if you ride often. For riders who do short rides 2-3x a week, probably not worth it. YMMV.
 

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I can't beleive I'm saying this, but as I get older (lol) riding all day and shifting a lot makes my thumb a little sore from the cable resistance. There's none of that with AXS. For people with arthritis or hand issues, AXS is the perfect solution.
Okay, MTV Real World confessional time -- my thumb got tendinitis from shifting so much last year. As the cable got more sticky my thumb got worse. I didn't want to tell anyone because I felt old and wimpy.

Where the hell did I put my Geritol?
 

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Yeah, I have a feeling most people saying they wouldn't want it due to whatever reasons haven't actually used it. Or, they've read one negative thing and formed an opinion based on that.

I know a few people that have been using AXS since it first came out with zero issues. I can't beleive I'm saying this, but as I get older (lol) riding all day and shifting a lot makes my thumb a little sore from the cable resistance. There's none of that with AXS. For people with arthritis or hand issues, AXS is the perfect solution. Plus, no fiddling with cables or swapping them out...ever. How is that NOT awesome?! Sure, $600 is a bit pricey (and it will come down just like the other AXS setups did), but IMHO it seriously worth the cost if you ride often. For riders who do short rides 2-3x a week, probably not worth it. YMMV.
The extra force require for the shimano mechanical shifters didn't help me here, it definitely pushed the problem over-the-top. Clutches made this action a little heavier, but Shimano action is MUCH heavier than SRAM on XT and XTR. Going back to SRAM on all my bikes solved it, but I have GS on one of them and that's also pretty brilliant if you have any thumb/tendonitis issues. I totally get the reasoning though, just to not have the problem. The charge on the battery lasts for months for most users.
 
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Yeah, I have a feeling most people saying they wouldn't want it due to whatever reasons haven't actually used it. Or, they've read one negative thing and formed an opinion based on that.

I know a few people that have been using AXS since it first came out with zero issues. I can't beleive I'm saying this, but as I get older (lol) riding all day and shifting a lot makes my thumb a little sore from the cable resistance. There's none of that with AXS. For people with arthritis or hand issues, AXS is the perfect solution. Plus, no fiddling with cables or swapping them out...ever. How is that NOT awesome?! Sure, $600 is a bit pricey (and it will come down just like the other AXS setups did), but IMHO it seriously worth the cost if you ride often. For riders who do short rides 2-3x a week, probably not worth it. YMMV.
Ive ridden and raced with people with problems while their bike went haywire.

Ive gotten calls from people stuck with dead batteries in remote areas.

I really don’t have much space to deal with charging yet another set of batteries. I am already sharing a charging area for two Garmins, headlights, tail lights. Not really in to adding another charging device. When I travel, it’s all this and the batteries for the camera as well. I basically have a bag dedicated to chargers!


I don’t know what fiddling with cables means. I upkeep a lot of bikes and rarely have to touch cables. Running new cable and indexing is about one of the most relaxing and easy jobs I ever do on a bike.

Having hand circulation issues is the only true validation I have seen. Everything else is an inconvenience and makes the bike heavier. A LOT heavier in the XC racing world.

If the battery lasted 100 hours, I’d probably be more interested. If I ran an AXS dropper I would be even more interested because then you have a backup battery on the bike. Between the AXS dropper and AXS seatpost you are adding almost an extra pound of weight, for what benefit? All this said I am sure I’ll have AXS on 1 or all bikes at some point in the next 3 years...

Does anyone ever worry how unbelievably easy it would be to steal an AXS dropper from a gas station or restaurant parking lot. I’m surprised this isn’t more of a thing.


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