Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi there, i have an opportunity to purchase a GT Pantera new, from a now closed-out inventory. As this bike is probably an early 1990's bike, it comes fully rigid as well as cantilever brakes. This bike in question I use to love and always wanted a pantera as it was a good mid-level bike. I am wondering though if i can simply change the brakes over to a better, more modern v-brake setup, as well as install a good front suspension fork. Thanx for anyone that can fill in the info or help me out.
 

·
Mantis, Paramount, Campy
Joined
·
4,726 Posts
I wouldn't change the components

A-ron said:
Hi there, i have an opportunity to purchase a GT Pantera new, from a now closed-out inventory. As this bike is probably an early 1990's bike, it comes fully rigid as well as cantilever brakes. This bike in question I use to love and always wanted a pantera as it was a good mid-level bike. I am wondering though if i can simply change the brakes over to a better, more modern v-brake setup, as well as install a good front suspension fork. Thanx for anyone that can fill in the info or help me out.
This bike will not handle well with a modern suspension fork. You could get a perion correct fork but finding one in good condition that is reliable can be a crap shoot.

As for v-brakes there is no need to upgrade. They would work with the bike but why? V-brakes don't perform any better than cantilever brakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Fork will work fine, Pantera's were coooool!

A fork will work fine, I had a '93 GT Corrado, and the head angle wasn't effected by the addition of a fork. You will need to keep it in the 80mm and under travel unless you don't mind the head angle being slacked a bit. Also, V-brakes will work fine, and will work MUCH better than older canti's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Not worth it

If you stick on a sus fork and v`s you may as well buy a more modern bike
I ruined an old Kona in this way, that`s the point of an old bike, ride it the way it was intended and you get a feel for how biking was at the time your bike was made

Got an old Breezer now and it`s great with rigid fork and cantis, still like the newer Stumpy with all the latest stuff though, just in a different way

Cheers
 

·
Mantis, Paramount, Campy
Joined
·
4,726 Posts
Exactly!

...and any suspension fork with more than 48mm of travel will jack up the front end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,985 Posts
A-ron said:
Hi there, i have an opportunity to purchase a GT Pantera new, from a now closed-out inventory. As this bike is probably an early 1990's bike, it comes fully rigid as well as cantilever brakes. This bike in question I use to love and always wanted a pantera as it was a good mid-level bike. I am wondering though if i can simply change the brakes over to a better, more modern v-brake setup, as well as install a good front suspension fork. Thanx for anyone that can fill in the info or help me out.
You can do this, but the value of the bike probably does not justify it.

It's my experience that a 63mm fork does not change the geometry enough to matter on an older rigid bike. Back in the day, Bridgestone sold the exact same frames as suspended or rigid with a non-suspension corrected fork. The whole argument that the frame must have the exact headtube angle with a rigid or supension fork is a bit bogus IMO. If you have a 71 degree headtube with a suspension, the first time you hit a bump on a downhill the fork compresses and the headtube angle effective steepens - on a rigid, it's always 71 degrees. I've run Bontrager frames with non-corrected rigid forks, 63mm forks, 70mm forks, and 80mm forks, and the handling is not different enough to matter to me.

If you happen to have a fork that will work, then why not try it. If you have to buy a fork and v-brakes (which in my opinion are many times better than cantis) then the cost for the whole set up probably does not justify it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
676 Posts
My rigid ´88 steel Miyata is definetely more comfortable than my ´96 oversized alloy Rafty hardtail with Manitou SX Mach5. Has also something to do with the angles and the ergonomics of the seatposition. Suspension isn´t holy.

I have bikes with canti´s (Campy RecordOR, XT, Exage Mountain), V-brakes (XT,LX,Deore), U-brakes (Exage Mountain) and Magura HS22. To my opinion well adjusted canti´s do an excellent job.

Furthermore: Take into account that the bike is totally ruined as ´Classic´ if you add stuff like V-brakes and modern suspension forks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanx to all for the insight. yes i understand this won't be a vintage or classic bike with newer items. i was just curious as to see if it would be cost effective for this bike. i found a place that sells them "new" for 275 for the pantera, factor in newer items and you're right, it would cost as much as a newer bike. i thought for some reason it would be cool to have a vintage style bike like the pantera with some newer items. it seems the fork is the big factor in this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Rear vbrakes may be a problem

early 90s GTs had a built in rear cable noodle instead of a cable stop. This makes using vbrakes more difficult. The shap of the gt top tube also flattens out close to the seat tube. This makes one of those cable stop clamps from QBP not work. My only option was to run the cable housing the full length of the top tube. Very getto. I ended up just running XTR cantis, which were very retro and cool. Especially when tuned perfectly, with just enough toe and the perfect 90 degree cable angles. Very nice...
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top