Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Happy New Year all,

I recently switched from a pickup to an SUV and now find myself removing my front wheel often. It's become a royal @!$#& to put it mildly and I'm finding myself stumped.

Avid Juicy 5's on older Vanilla 125RLC with Hayes V6 rotors. Every bleepin' time I remount the wheel I ultimately have to readjust the calipers to keep from rubbing. I see no discernable play in the wheel hub. The Avids do not have a caliper alignment system like the BB7's. I was thinking I need to shim them out a bit with something next time I adjust???

Just to clarify... when I replace the front wheel, it never seems to seat in the same place, meaning I then need to realign the caliper.

(I've already played that fun game where the 7 year old grabs a handful of lever while the wheel is off.)

Appreciate any input
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
SteveUK said:
You just need to work on getting the QR tension the same every time you refit the wheel.
No offense, but I think what you mention is obvious. I don't believe I should have so much play that I need to realign the caliper each time.
 

·
um hmmm
Joined
·
151 Posts
Juicy 5's do have the Cailper positioning system that ALL avid disc brakes have.


Sounds to me like you are not installing a pad spacer when you remove your wheel and the lever is getting touched just enough to upset your pad settings and causing your rotor to rub.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
put the wheel on the bike, don't tighten down the qr all the way. put some load on the bike, roll back and forth if you'd like. Get off bike, set qr to desired tightness. Same trick works on the rear.

Also, pad spacer is your friend.
 

·
...idios...
Joined
·
5,662 Posts
steven.c said:
No offense, but I think what you mention is obvious. I don't believe I should have so much play that I need to realign the caliper each time.
And why cant it be something obvious? If you're not pressing the lever when the wheel is out (and thus moving the pistons/pads), then QR tension is your only variable. Just try it: refit the wheel at different QR tensions and eventually you'll get the one which allows the rotor to run through the pads without catching.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
974 Posts
SteveUK said:
And why cant it be something obvious? If you're not pressing the lever when the wheel is out (and thus moving the pistons/pads), then QR tension is your only variable. Just try it: refit the wheel at different QR tensions and eventually you'll get the one which allows the rotor to run through the pads without catching.
What he said.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,039 Posts
y0bailey said:
What he said.
+2 It can make all the difference in the world. You might not think of the hub and fork legs as compressible objects, but there is absolutely enough play that one amount of skewer tension can make the caliper rub the inside pad and doing the skewer tighter makes it rub the outside pad
 

·
yorkshire mud monkey
Joined
·
186 Posts
if you dont have a spacer to hold ya pads out when wheel is off find a ball that will fit between the lever and grip then use a elastic band to wrap round and hay presto no one can put the brakes on with out the wheel in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
SteveUK said:
... then QR tension is your only variable. ....
almost....

I suppose I should have emphasized the "older" part of my fork. Put the bike upside down under some good lighting this evening and discovered the issue. Standing straight in front when tightening, I could watch the wheel cant consistently in one direction. The outside of the non-disc side fork dropout has a slight cup worn into 2/3rds of the diameter of the face.

No wonder it's dammed near impossible to seat the hub correctly.

I think if I could find a QR with a larger diameter I might get by for a while since the cupping is limited to one area (hard to visual without pics, I'm sure.)

Grrrr. again.
 

·
trail addict
Joined
·
1,866 Posts
If all else fails (there was some good advice here and sounds like you have a potentially worn-out dropout) you should try retracting the pistons with a screwdriver rather than repositioning the caliper. I run 2 different wheels on one of my bikes and found that there is the tiniest bit of difference between the two causing a small amount of rub.... so when swapping wheels, I just (gently, with screwdriver and rag) pry the pads apart, put on the wheel, and pump the lever a few times. Sure beats loosening the mounting bolts and messing with caliper alignment every time (unless you have rub so bad that it is beyond this minor "adjustment").
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,083 Posts
you guys aren't addressing the issue. his problem is that the groove created by the QR does not align with the seated axle position ie. when QR tighten, it pushes the axle out of place --> then when u correct for that, the axle is pushed back into place whne you put weight on it and start riding.
 

·
Never trust a fart
Joined
·
4,543 Posts
That is not a groove created by the QR. That is a groove created by the lawyers that made the fork companies manufacture them into the drop outs.

Most people call them lawyer tabs. Its due to the fact that there are moreons out there that forgot to make sure their front wheel was tight, the wheel fell off, and then they sued the fork/bike companies for the public's general stupidity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
frdfandc said:
That is not a groove created by the QR. That is a groove created by the lawyers that made the fork companies manufacture them into the drop outs.

Most people call them lawyer tabs. Its due to the fact that there are moreons out there that forgot to make sure their front wheel was tight, the wheel fell off, and then they sued the fork/bike companies for the public's general stupidity.
he's right
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,039 Posts
frdfandc said:
That is not a groove created by the QR. That is a groove created by the lawyers that made the fork companies manufacture them into the drop outs.

Most people call them lawyer tabs. Its due to the fact that there are moreons out there that forgot to make sure their front wheel was tight, the wheel fell off, and then they sued the fork/bike companies for the public's general stupidity.
It does look like there is a narrow groove worn in the dropout though. Just inside the lawyer lip on the bottom side of the opening it looks like there is a groove worn in around the inside circumference of the lip, the silver color gives the worn area away. Magnesium is a pretty soft metal and dropouts can certainly get messed up
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
boomn said:
It does look like there is a narrow groove worn in the dropout though. Just inside the lawyer lip on the bottom side of the opening it looks like there is a groove worn in around the inside circumference of the lip, the silver color gives the worn area away. Magnesium is a pretty soft metal and dropouts can certainly get messed up
true, but that ammount isn't gonna do anything... how does material missing from that side of the dropout screw with the wheel alignment anyway? :skep:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,039 Posts
AlexJK said:
true, but that ammount isn't gonna do anything... how does material missing from that side of the dropout screw with the wheel alignment anyway? :skep:
because that is what the skewer nut is bracing against.

I'm not talking about the surface of the lawyer lip that nothing touches, I'm talking about the inside area where skewer contacts the dropout and trying to confirm whether the OP is talking about the same thing
 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 34 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top