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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have off and on considered adopting a retired racing greyhound for years now. I always thought I might do it when my medium-large mixed breed died, which happened about a year ago. So far I have just kept my dachschund and haven't looked into a second dog again.

I was wondering if anyone had experience with the breed and bikes. I know they are supposed to make great walking dogs and good jogging partners. I also know they need to be leashed or even muzzled at all times due to their propensity to chase and run and attack small animals.

I wouldn't think it would be a great choice for an actual trail dog. But for bike paths and fireroads I thought it might be ok to ride with. Has anyone ridden with a greyhound? Additionally, would anyone have bike specific leash recommendations?

Not sure I'm going to even do this, leaning towards not actually but I might go to a meet and greet for a regional rescue to see some dogs. Thanks!
 

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my parents had one - i took it off leash all the time - but, don't expect to go any significant distance without it getting super tired - they get impacted by the heat and cold very quickly. Great dog for grandma and grandpa or people with kids.
 

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Have had a few retired greyhounds.
Great dogs, fine pets.

But not trail dogs. I'd jog with one of mine and he'd be beat after 30 minutes (at my leisurely pace). Of course, he'd bust out some sprints when off-leash, but they are use to racing every third day at most.
 

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I'll agree with what's already been said. They've been bred to be very fast for a short distance. They just don't have any endurance. I believe my dog to be a greyhound/lab mix (not entirely sure since he was a stray), and even with the lab in him he's only good for about a mile or so then he starts lagging behind. He's fast as hell for that 1st half mile though.
 

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Paper thin skinned sissies, to boot. No offense anyone- I actually like them alot, but...
Kinda like roadies without lungs. ;)
 

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I agree, short duration sprinters. Some friends have a pair. They take them to the beach where they dash about at 12,000 rpms for about 20 minutes....then sleep in the back seat of the car the whole way home.




p.s. Love the Jerry's palm avitar.
 

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It would be a pretty bad idea to let them off leash on a trail. In fact, if you told the rescue group that you intended to do that you would probably get blacklisted.

But don't let that stop you from adopting one! They make great pets. Many of them are very affectionate and often quite lazy. You'll be saving it's life by taking it home. :thumbsup:
 

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I have been fortunate to share my life with several Greyhounds and a Saluki over the last thirty years. We have two grey's currently..my best buddy passed recently at nearly 13.. he was a hoot and a good many of the wrinkles and lines on my face are a result of cracking up at his antics.

Greyhounds or Saluki's can be trained/conditiond as good jogging partners but for biking partners.. not so much.

Greyhounds have some limitations. They are fragile in that they have thin skin and little body fat and cut easily. Buy a tube of medical grade super glue and learn how to use it. They arn't the brightest bulb on the tree either. We're not talking canine window lickers here, but they are not known for their smarts. They are very affectionate and socialize well with people and other animals.

As far as allowing them off leash in a non-enclosed area….well let's consider that for 3000 years they have been bred to do one thing... catch fast moving objects, period. There is no breed standard for color, speed and agility is what matters. One of my big males together with our Saluki (a beautiful breed) ran down a deer on a friends farm. It was amazing to watch and the deer escaped unharmed as once cornered it kicked at the dogs and the "fun" was over and they lost interest.

For one to think that we can condition a greyhound not to chase is extremely arrogant and usually ends in tragedy for the dog. A greyhound in good condition can go 0 - 45 (MPH) in three strides (about 20 feet which is faster than you can say….come back) and average well over 30 for a mile. In a minute your best friend is a half-mile away and clueless as to how he/she got there or where they came from. They have a single purpose when chasing and they bcok out any input except visually seeking the prey they are chasing.

With this said they make wonderful pets and indoor dogs. They do not have oil glands at the base of each hair follicle so they do not have "doggie smell". When wet they can get hypothermic quickly if it is cold out and a lack of body fat makes them susceptible to temperature extreme.

PM me if you want some advice on adopting or what to expect and what to stay away from when choosing a Greyhound as your buddy.

Attached a photo from a while back..
 

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One of my neighbors has a non-racing greyhound (and has had them before too). He often goes out with it by bike, but it is at very leisurely pace. They do cover some distance ... and take their time.

His greyhounds have been very calm creatures, but he also seems to know how to raise his dogs to be that way. For quite a while he thought this one didn't even care about hares... The hare that changed his mind ran across a street. Fortunately the impact betwen dog and car was not all that hard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, that pretty much answers all my questions about riding with one. Thanks.

I've done a fair amount of research on the breed/adoption. I was considering more short rides with one of those bike tether leashes. Not letting off leash, especially not in the middle of the woods/trail system. I've never really ridden with a dog at all anyway, so not a big deal to find they aren't a great fit.

STT, one question I had about rescues, do they usually take readily to house breaking? I read that they take very well to crates at least since they are used to being kenneled from the track and like to sleep a lot anyway, but I would probably want to let mine have use of an old couch and want to count on it being properly house broken. Wasn't sure if they had any concept of that coming from racing. I suppose it somewhat depends where they are being kept or foster home'd waiting for adoption.
 

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picassomoon said:
Well, that pretty much answers all my questions about riding with one. Thanks.

I've done a fair amount of research on the breed/adoption. I was considering more short rides with one of those bike tether leashes. Not letting off leash, especially not in the middle of the woods/trail system. I've never really ridden with a dog at all anyway, so not a big deal to find they aren't a great fit.

STT, one question I had about rescues, do they usually take readily to house breaking? I read that they take very well to crates at least since they are used to being kenneled from the track and like to sleep a lot anyway, but I would probably want to let mine have use of an old couch and want to count on it being properly house broken. Wasn't sure if they had any concept of that coming from racing. I suppose it somewhat depends where they are being kept or foster home'd waiting for adoption.
Greyhounds live in crates and actually like them and feel secure there. We use crates for a while with a new dog and then remove the crate but leave beding where the crate was and this seems to be a good transition. I (highly) suggest that you use a crate in the first few months of your friends stay.

A dog typically won't soil where it sleeps, so that really helps with house breaking. Seperation anxiety varies from dog to dog... Also Greyhounds are sensitive to diet changes... be warned.

Remember, when your new friend comes home he or she will have no clue how to navigate stairs, so if you have them you'll have to teach your friend how to go up and down them.

Good luck.
 

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I have a pointer mix now, took to running with my mountain bike from the very first pedal stroke. Great speed, endurance and smart. Adopted from the Humaine Society at age 1. She IS a dominant female so if you have other dogs expect the pointer to become the pack leader quickly unless other dogs are tough.
Anothere thing to remember is the more tech the ride for dogs the better. As the tech features slow down the rider it makes it easy for them to catch up. All I have to say is Gooseberry (Mesa) or just grab the bike and they're ready, a very favorite trail and one of the best on Earth.
My other dog is a pit mix the pointer found abandoned. She's strong, not as fast, but every scent distracts her, slowing rides.
 
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