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In your mind what sets a great wheels builder apart from the good. I know true and round, but how about something more??
 

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That's easy - one who specs or advises you on the best parts for you, your riding and your budget. One who builds the wheels that are correctly built with sufficient tension, equal tension, stresses relieved, spokes bedded and rims acceptably true. Their wheels wouldn't go out of true or tension during the life of the wheel (unless the rim is bent) and if this happened, the wheels could be re-trued (due to lubricated nipple threads).

All this is easily doable by the home wheelbuilder and doesn't have to be the sole domain of some acclaimed mystical "guru".
 

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I've built a number of wheels for myself, my freinds and my customers and besides the first couple have not had any complaints of durability or repairability.

Am I the best, I sure hope not. Am I confident in my skill to build a good wheel? Absolutely.
 

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I am looking to get a new wheelset, as referenced in this thread: http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=475972 (Chris King ISO hubs, with mavic 823 rims)
I'm considering a few different places to get them, and leaning towards universalcycles. Seems like people like the wheels they build. You guys that build wheels, or know lots about them; what should i be looking at from someone who builds this specific set? What spokes and nipples would work best on this particular wheelset, in terms of quality and performance? And what else is a factor when getting these built?
 

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Old School ......

I was tought by Bill Woodall how to build wheels. Only the old timers would know who he is ( passed away). He was the mechanic and used to drive the Campagnolo van with the bubble on top years ago.....

Anyways...I was always taught that if the rim has a one way label, it must face the direction of the crankset. In addition, when you look through the hole in the rim where the air valve is, you should see the brand mark on the hub.

When mounting tires, the label on the tire MUST ALWAYS be positioned beside the valve....reason is that it makes it easier to find.

May sound over the top, but it indicates to you how professional they approach the craft of wheelbuilding. Just like an electrician that positions the slots on the screws to run vertically on the light switches.......
 

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Bentley78 said:
what should i be looking at from someone who builds this specific set?
It's hard to know what information you're looking for and therefore even harder to give any. Unless you're looking over the shoulder of the builder, yourself armed with all the knowledge needed, you're just taking a leap of faith. But if you had all this knowledge, you'd build them yourself. At some point, if you choose to let someone else build them, you're going to have to trust them.

Do yourself a massive favor before you order (or build) anything and read up on the basic info in my sig. At the end is a link to what I consider the finest stand-alone wheelbuilding info available - Roger Musson's e-book. When you're done reading all this info you'll be the finest expert on wheels who never actually built one.

What spokes and nipples would work best on this particular wheelset, in terms of quality and performance? And what else is a factor when getting these built?
You give us no information on you (your weight and skill level), your type of riding (smooth trails; baby-head rock gardens; 10' drops) or anything. So it's not possible to advise you except as a large generalization. The best spokes and nipples for the vast majority are stainless spokes in 2.0/1.8/2.0mm thickness with brass nipples, 32 of them per wheel, crossed 3.
 

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I know ultimately it's gonna come down to trusting a place, but I like to understand what i'm buying, especially if it's very expensive, which these are.

You give us no information on you (your weight and skill level), your type of riding (smooth trails; baby-head rock gardens; 10' drops) or anything. So it's not possible to advise you except as a large generalization. The best spokes and nipples for the vast majority are stainless spokes in 2.0/1.8/2.0mm thickness with brass nipples, 32 of them per wheel, crossed 3.[/QUOTE]

I am 180, i feel i am pretty skilled technical rider. I ride in Mass, and it's varied. Lots of what i ride is gnarly, tight technical stuff, rocky, rooty, some drops, (don't really hit anything over 5 or 6 feet, though i may in the future...), to rockgarden and dh type stuff. I tend to ride aggressively and my terrain is not the easiest on wheels. I want a set I don't have to worry about, thats fairly light. I noticed it seems most places use the dt swiss double butted competition spokes...
 

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Bentley78 said:
I noticed it seems most places use the dt swiss double butted competition spokes...
And for very good reasons! I use (on the wheels I build myself) Sapim Race spokes as I know a distributor. They're basically equal. DT are just much more common in N.Am.
 
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