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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am interested in a Gravity Dropper seatpost but have this concern. Isn't there some situations where "full pedaling" height is not a benefit ( some technical climbing maybe) and the dropped height is to low? I might be overanalyzing this but is there anyone with experience in these situations that use a dropping seatpost?
 

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Yup, I have 3 positions on mine. One is 1" lower, and one is 3" lower. I use the highest setting for long non-technical climbing, and I use the 1" lower for most singletrack and will lower it 3" for really steep technical descents. It has worked great for me.
 

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namrita said:
Yup, I have 3 positions on mine. One is 1" lower, and one is 3" lower. I use the highest setting for long non-technical climbing, and I use the 1" lower for most singletrack and will lower it 3" for really steep technical descents. It has worked great for me.
You have 3 settings during the same ride?

I spoke with the owner the other day and he didn't mention that. He told me that they sell it in a 2", 3" and 4" version and that you can change between the setting s, BUT not on the fly. You need different inserts.
 

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Blue Shorts said:
You have 3 settings during the same ride?

I spoke with the owner the other day and he didn't mention that. He told me that they sell it in a 2", 3" and 4" version and that you can change between the setting s, BUT not on the fly. You need different inserts.
edit: there is a difference between inches of drop and # of settings. i think the standard is 2 positions (regardless of 2, 3, 4" of drop in the post). the added 3rd position might cost extra, i don't remember.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
3 Positions Would Be Ideal

Namrita's setup sounds great. I am going to call regarding the 3 position setup and I will report back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
They Do have 3 Positions

Just got off the phone with them. You can control all 3 of the positions with the lever. My only concern is the lack of any lieback. I use a Thompson Layback seatpost now and have always used layback seatposts.
 

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Brihombre said:
Just got off the phone with them. You can control all 3 of the positions with the lever. My only concern is the lack of any lieback. I use a Thompson Layback seatpost now and have always used layback seatposts.
If your bike is fitted properly you shouldn't need a setback seatpost. That said, since you allways use them, where is your seat positioned (foward, back or middle) if its forward or middle you can move it back with the same results
 

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dan0 said:
If your bike is fitted properly you shouldn't need a setback seatpost.
I don't think that's true. Bikes have different seat tube angles. If you want to retain the same saddle position relative to the pedals, you need to slide the seat back as the seat tube angle increases. There is nothing wrong with doing this, and it is not indicative that the bike does not fit, but it is something you need to take into account when figurng out how long your cockpit will really be.
 

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Brihombre said:
Just got off the phone with them. You can control all 3 of the positions with the lever. My only concern is the lack of any lieback. I use a Thompson Layback seatpost now and have always used layback seatposts.
I used a Thomson setback post before I got the Gravity Dropper and had the same concern. I moved my seat back a little more from what it was on the setback post and it's perfect. Granted, I got a new bike that does fit me better..(used to ride a Blur, now I ride a King Kikapu). You could always look into getting a new saddle with longer rails if your current saddle is already as far back as it will go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Anatomy Matters

In the 18 years I have been riding I have never had a bike that, for me, didn' require a setback post. I feel I get more power as well as control.
 

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well unless you've got some extra long thigh bones a properly fitted bike shouldn't need a setback post. a different seat tube angle wont make that much difference unless you have the post way up, and if its that high your seat would move further back not forward.(I'm assuming that all your previous bikes had seat tubes that leaned backward) The top tube makes more difference as far as moving the seat forward or back. for instance the enduro top tube length is 21.7" small, 23.1" medium, 24.1" large & 25.12" xlarge. the seat tube angle is 73.5 for all
maybe the biikes you've had just didn't have the design that you like , some bikes are long and low , some are more upright. My sugar is long and low but my enduro is more upright, both are good bikes and I like riding them both for different reasons. So if you like the setback post use it. but using a setback post is overcoming a design or size issue
(for more proof, how many manufacturers include them on their bikes from the factory)
 

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Actually, a Thompson lie-back seatpost doesn't give you that much set back, the off-set just makes up for the type of seat clamp it uses. An easton EA 70, a OE Kosky, and plenty others will give just as much or more set back than the Thompson.
 

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ChipV said:
Actually, a Thompson lie-back seatpost doesn't give you that much set back, the off-set just makes up for the type of seat clamp it uses. An easton EA 70, a OE Kosky, and plenty others will give just as much or more set back than the Thompson.
An EA70 is a setback post. Almost all of Easton's posts are setback. The new, expensive ones come in both flavors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Long Thigh Bones

dan0 said:
well unless you've got some extra long thigh bones a properly fitted bike shouldn't need a setback post. a different seat tube angle wont make that much difference unless you have the post way up, and if its that high your seat would move further back not forward.(I'm assuming that all your previous bikes had seat tubes that leaned backward) The top tube makes more difference as far as moving the seat forward or back. for instance the enduro top tube length is 21.7" small, 23.1" medium, 24.1" large & 25.12" xlarge. the seat tube angle is 73.5 for all
maybe the biikes you've had just didn't have the design that you like , some bikes are long and low , some are more upright. My sugar is long and low but my enduro is more upright, both are good bikes and I like riding them both for different reasons. So if you like the setback post use it. but using a setback post is overcoming a design or size issue
(for more proof, how many manufacturers include them on their bikes from the factory)
That is indeed what I have. The Thompson Setback post is just enough. I adjust my seat to put myself in my most efficient pedaling position. Everything else is set up based on that. I don't think pedal position has anything to do with TT length. I have had many, many bikes and I currently ride an Intense 5.5. I think the design is fine and the bike fits great.
 

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dan0 said:
well unless you've got some extra long thigh bones a properly fitted bike shouldn't need a setback post. a different seat tube angle wont make that much difference unless you have the post way up, and if its that high your seat would move further back not forward.(I'm assuming that all your previous bikes had seat tubes that leaned backward) The top tube makes more difference as far as moving the seat forward or back. for instance the enduro top tube length is 21.7" small, 23.1" medium, 24.1" large & 25.12" xlarge. the seat tube angle is 73.5 for all
maybe the biikes you've had just didn't have the design that you like , some bikes are long and low , some are more upright. My sugar is long and low but my enduro is more upright, both are good bikes and I like riding them both for different reasons. So if you like the setback post use it. but using a setback post is overcoming a design or size issue
(for more proof, how many manufacturers include them on their bikes from the factory)
You need to look at the top tube length AND the seat tube angle to know what the reach is like. The seat tube angle ABSOLUTELY matters. Just think about it. If you have two bikes with the same top tube length, but one has a 70 degree seat tube and the other has a 73 degree seat tube, the one with the 70 degree seat tube is going to have a bb significantly farther forward. If you want to have the same seat position relative to the pedals, you will have to slide the seat forward on the one with the 70 degree seat tube and thus you have shortened the cockpit. In other words, the tt length and the seat ube need to be considered together.

At the same time, if bike A has a slightly longer tt than bike B but a slacker seat angle, the relation of the bb and the head tube may be exactly the same. If you slide the seat back a little bit on bike B you will have exactly the same fit.

We all have an optimal position for our saddle relative to the bb. This is essentially our optimum seat angle. If the seat tube angle on a bike is more or less than this, then you need to slide the seat forward or back to get the right angle. This is NOT indicative of teh bike not fitting, you just have to take this into accound when considering how long of a top tube you need.

The optimum seat angle is very different for different folks, and it has to do with a lot more than the length of their femur. Mostly it has to do with riding style. I have rediculously short femurs, but I like my seat pretty far back (relative to the pedals) on my trailbike. My seat being slid back has NOTHING to do with the tt length. I would need a seat ube angle of about 69 degrees to consider loosing the setback post.

Don't get too hung up on the old standards of how to fit a bike. Bikes, geometries, and riding styles have changed a lot.

Plenty of bikes come from the manufacturer with setback posts, like almost anything with an Easton post.
 

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kapusta said:
You need to look at the top tube length AND the seat tube angle to know what the reach is like. The seat tube angle ABSOLUTELY matters. Just think about it. If you have two bikes with the same top tube length, but one has a 70 degree seat tube and the other has a 73 degree seat tube, the one with the 70 degree seat tube is going to have a bb significantly farther forward. If you want to have the same seat position relative to the pedals, you will have to slide the seat forward on the one with the 70 degree seat tube and thus you have shortened the cockpit. In other words, the tt length and the seat ube need to be considered together.

At the same time, if bike A has a slightly longer tt than bike B but a slacker seat angle, the relation of the bb and the head tube may be exactly the same. If you slide the seat back a little bit on bike B you will have exactly the same fit.

We all have an optimal position for our saddle relative to the bb. This is essentially our optimum seat angle. If the seat tube angle on a bike is more or less than this, then you need to slide the seat forward or back to get the right angle. This is NOT indicative of teh bike not fitting, you just have to take this into accound when considering how long of a top tube you need.

The optimum seat angle is very different for different folks, and it has to do with a lot more than the length of their femur. Mostly it has to do with riding style. I have rediculously short femurs, but I like my seat pretty far back (relative to the pedals) on my trailbike. My seat being slid back has NOTHING to do with the tt length. I would need a seat ube angle of about 69 degrees to consider loosing the setback post.

Don't get too hung up on the old standards of how to fit a bike. Bikes, geometries, and riding styles have changed a lot.

Plenty of bikes come from the manufacturer with setback posts, like almost anything with an Easton post.
Thats providing your seat post is attached to your bottom bracket in a straight line or at least the bottom bracket lines up with your seat. It really depends on the frame type and the angles engineered into the frame. even where the shock is attached will make a diff. and how big your fork is too. if you have a 100mm fork you have 1 angle but if you increase it to 150mm all angles change. The enduro has a rear shock shuttle that changes the head angle from 68 to 69 and raises the BB.
if you add a setback you are virtually changing the seat tube angle because your ass is now behind where the seat tube was designed for it to be, wheather or not it s a better ride has nothing to do with the design of the bike because you altered the design when you added the post
I think we are saying the same thing though, I say the bike should fit the rider and your saying add a setback to make the bike fit the rider, whatever works as long as the bike fits the rider
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I Understand

kapusta said:
You need to look at the top tube length AND the seat tube angle to know what the reach is like. The seat tube angle ABSOLUTELY matters. Just think about it. If you have two bikes with the same top tube length, but one has a 70 degree seat tube and the other has a 73 degree seat tube, the one with the 70 degree seat tube is going to have a bb significantly farther forward. If you want to have the same seat position relative to the pedals, you will have to slide the seat forward on the one with the 70 degree seat tube and thus you have shortened the cockpit. In other words, the tt length and the seat ube need to be considered together.

At the same time, if bike A has a slightly longer tt than bike B but a slacker seat angle, the relation of the bb and the head tube may be exactly the same. If you slide the seat back a little bit on bike B you will have exactly the same fit.

We all have an optimal position for our saddle relative to the bb. This is essentially our optimum seat angle. If the seat tube angle on a bike is more or less than this, then you need to slide the seat forward or back to get the right angle. This is NOT indicative of teh bike not fitting, you just have to take this into accound when considering how long of a top tube you need.

The optimum seat angle is very different for different folks, and it has to do with a lot more than the length of their femur. Mostly it has to do with riding style. I have rediculously short femurs, but I like my seat pretty far back (relative to the pedals) on my trailbike. My seat being slid back has NOTHING to do with the tt length. I would need a seat ube angle of about 69 degrees to consider loosing the setback post.

Don't get too hung up on the old standards of how to fit a bike. Bikes, geometries, and riding styles have changed a lot.

Plenty of bikes come from the manufacturer with setback posts, like almost anything with an Easton post.
I know you what you are saying and I do think we are saying the same thing. I was just talking more about pedal position rather than seat position. I realize that a longer TT will slacken the seat tube and I may not need to position my seat back as far. Back to the Gravity Dropper however, I have always had bikes with long top tubes and I have always needed some (a little) setback in my posts. The Gravity Dropper with no setback may be an issue for me. I just found out the Maverick Speedball adjustible seatpost will be out on Dec. 18th and I believe it is setback. Thanks for the feedback.
 

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Brihombre said:
I know you what you are saying and I do think we are saying the same thing. I was just talking more about pedal position rather than seat position. I realize that a longer TT will slacken the seat tube and I may not need to position my seat back as far. Back to the Gravity Dropper however, I have always had bikes with long top tubes and I have always needed some (a little) setback in my posts. The Gravity Dropper with no setback may be an issue for me. I just found out the Maverick Speedball adjustible seatpost will be out on Dec. 18th and I believe it is setback. Thanks for the feedback.
http://maverickbike.com/productdetails.aspx?pid=123
doesn't look quite as slick as the grav dropper. I'm not sure how easy it will be to adjust on the fly. Seems like an air sprung quick release . Does appear to be set back an inch or so.
Maybe someone could come up with a setback seat clamp that would work with any post or seat
 

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Brihombre said:
I know you what you are saying and I do think we are saying the same thing. I was just talking more about pedal position rather than seat position. I realize that a longer TT will slacken the seat tube and I may not need to position my seat back as far. Back to the Gravity Dropper however, I have always had bikes with long top tubes and I have always needed some (a little) setback in my posts. The Gravity Dropper with no setback may be an issue for me. I just found out the Maverick Speedball adjustible seatpost will be out on Dec. 18th and I believe it is setback. Thanks for the feedback.
Yes, I think we do agree. My reply was to Dano's post, not yours.
 
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