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Scott in Tucson
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Biased, for sure, but in enabling me to do ridiculously long exploratory rides it has definitely improved my riding and my ability to 'go further.'

Collecting data on ~all my rides has helped too. Computing stats, looking at traces and playing back rides is all good for motivation. :thumbsup:
 

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This is almost embarrassing to say, but yeah, my GPS improved my riding simply by getting me out riding more.

I am a self confessed "data whore" - part of what gets me out on the trail is knowing I am gonna map something and provide it to the community. Plus it has more than once pushed me to add a few miles to many rides in the name of exploration.

Feelin' a little nerdy right now....
 

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Nathan Cloud said:
This is almost embarrassing to say, but yeah, my GPS improved my riding simply by getting me out riding more.

I am a self confessed "data whore" - part of what gets me out on the trail is knowing I am gonna map something and provide it to the community. Plus it has more than once pushed me to add a few miles to many rides in the name of exploration.

Feelin' a little nerdy right now....
Nerdy is the word for me - I stumbled on a forum how to mod a car GPS into a windows Bike GPS (by chance the model I had) . So I biked all the surrounding GPX tracks I could find next to my home, mainly found on GPSIES - ruined my cheapo MTB from all the riding and bought a MTB for a price that 2 years ago I would have never ever spent on.
Its neat to ride tracks found on the internet, neat to view the logged data, neat to race against yourself and keep track of your performance.
I'm playing around now with video and syncing to the GPX file:

As its winter I'm taking a MTB break but use the GPS for skiing - I was always wondering what speeds I was skiing at - now l know
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9GgnQz0__nE

Also thinking of buying a ERGO home trainer bike. You can load the GPX files and ride the tours you logged - not sure how good it works as its pretty new. If anyone has any experience would be great to hear.
 

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crux said:
Perhaps this forum will be a bit bias, but in your opinion has GPS improved your riding? both in terms of endurance, strength and speed?
Not at all, except for keeping me from getting lost on the Tour of the White Mountains.

My rides have improved because I've been able to explore places I otherwise never would have found.
 

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since 4/10/2009
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I've only used GPS on rides to date to help with navigation. Fitness tracking is new to me this year, so we'll see how that goes.
 

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trail rat
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Yes, absolutely.

I'll support what Krein and NathanCloud say above.

I got a GPS primarily to collect heart rate data because my doc told me "no more MTB" after cardiac issues. I was not going to stop riding, but at least I got his wholehearted (pun intended) approval. :thumbsup:

Here is just one of hundreds of ways to view your fitness.


This compares the same ride about 10 weeks apart; you can see that less time to cover the same route means I am faster and more fit.
 

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Official ***** Idiot
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Not particularly. I have an advantage living in a smallish area with a ton of riders, though. There's almost always somebody ready to ride every day, and it's a good chance they know parts of the trail (or a whole new trail) that you've never seen before. Even if you do ride alone, and manage to get lost.........turn left. You'll run into a road soon enough. I do carry my Treo Pro on solo rides, more for emergencies in case I take a spill hard enough to need emergency assistance, and it's helped me out on a couple of occasions where I went exploring and got my head turned around,,,,,,,,,,,but see that "turn left" statement. I still get more value out of a regular, good quality bike computer than I do out of my GPS, really, and a nice little compass. GPS is there if I really wind up needing it, but I haven't yet.
 

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slocaus said:
Yes, absolutely.

I'll support what Krein and NathanCloud say above.

I got a GPS primarily to collect heart rate data because my doc told me "no more MTB" after cardiac issues. I was not going to stop riding, but at least I got his wholehearted (pun intended) approval. :thumbsup:

Here is just one of hundreds of ways to view your fitness.


This compares the same ride about 10 weeks apart; you can see that less time to cover the same route means I am faster and more fit.
I'm curious what program you used with the "compare two items" feature?
I'm also curious what GPS you used. The similarity in the elevation curves indicates to me that your GPS has a barometric altimeter?
 

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smilinsteve said:
I'm curious what program you used with the "compare two items" feature?
I'm also curious what GPS you used. The similarity in the elevation curves indicates to me that your GPS has a barometric altimeter?

Looks like Garmin Training Center
 

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My GPS has helped me out tremendously.
I LOVE the "virtual partner" feature that lets me race myself. I keep updating my best time, and try to beat it.
I am a data whore too, HRM, cadence(roadbike), altitude gain/loss, Cal burned. it motivates me to keep riding farther and faster.
 

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luap said:
Nerdy is the word for me - I stumbled on a forum how to mod a car GPS into a windows Bike GPS (by chance the model I had) . So I biked all the surrounding GPX tracks I could find next to my home, mainly found on GPSIES - ruined my cheapo MTB from all the riding and bought a MTB for a price that 2 years ago I would have never ever spent on.
Its neat to ride tracks found on the internet, neat to view the logged data, neat to race against yourself and keep track of your performance.
I'm playing around now with video and syncing to the GPX file:

As its winter I'm taking a MTB break but use the GPS for skiing - I was always wondering what speeds I was skiing at - now l know
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9GgnQz0__nE

Also thinking of buying a ERGO home trainer bike. You can load the GPX files and ride the tours you logged - not sure how good it works as its pretty new. If anyone has any experience would be great to hear.
That video is funny, I hope you weren't hurt.:D

What a dumb ass that guy was, no idea to get single file, in fact he remained indecisive, leaving you to guess and try to stop.
 

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trail rat
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smilinsteve said:
I'm curious what program you used with the "compare two items" feature?
I'm also curious what GPS you used. The similarity in the elevation curves indicates to me that your GPS has a barometric altimeter?
Yes, Garmin Training Center; that one graphic ability is the only reason I keep using it. None of the other three packages I use let me do that.

Those tracks are from a 305, I now have a 705 for riding and yes, both have the barometric altimeter. I also have a 60CSx that I used to ride with when I needed to use it for navigation, but the 705 does that for me now. The 60CSx is used in my truck and for trail building / surveys / reroutes where I need the most accurate tracks due to its helix antenna.
 

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Two Tired
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Having a GPS has helped me a lot. I keep track of all my rides which allows me to build consolidated maps and compare routes over time. For me, having the data builds a bit of "self competition" to see if I can do better than my previous best. I suppose you could do the basics with a simple Cateye (or equivalent), but then you have to make sure you are comparing apples to apples and you only have the final totals. I think having good software makes all the difference. I use SportTracks and TopoFusion and I think both programs are excellent. I have been completely unimpressed with the Garmin software.

With the GPS, I have the totals but I can also look at a particular section and extract the data of interest. For example, there is a steep shortish hill that is between my starting point and several trails. I can track just this section to measure progress regardless of which combination of trails I ride each time. Knowing my personal record gives me an easy target to shoot for.

It also allows you to measure distance, time, ascent, number of rides, etc. over time. It is easy to compare by week, month, year, etc. This may be way nerdy, but sometimes it is the thing that gets you out on the bike when you might not otherwise feel like it.

My friends that don't have a GPS seem to like to see where they rode and time and elevation profiles. I probably get added to some rides lists since I always contribute the ride info back to the group.

I don't have a lot of racing experience, but I did prep for a race once by "dot racing" some practice runs. This helped me focus on places where I needed to put in some extra effort. It seemed to pay off.

I also think the weight of the GPS helps me build stronger legs! ;)
 

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Not sure that it's helped my riding per say but definitely has helped motivate me to do some exploring off the beaten path. None the less I collected a ton of data this past season while riding and am just now starting to really play around with it. WOW lots of fun to be had this winter.
 
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