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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My sis and her BF brought their 3-week old bikes back to Supergo MV last week for their free new purchase tune-up (I offered, I really did!) -- her new Hollowpoint and his new Rockhopper FSR.

Six days later the bikes were ready, so we all headed over and picked them up and headed up into the hills for a ride.

I'm sorry, was that a free tuneup, or was it "hey, bring you bike in and we'll hang on to it for a week and f- it up."

It wasn't a big deal, but she couldn't drop into her granny ring. Turns out they reset the front derailleur so that the cage was nearly 1/2" above the big ring, the low limit screw was completely backed out, and the cage was rotated out of plane a few degrees too much. Cable tension was whacked becasue they didn't bother to readjust it after raising the derailleur height.

The free tune up is a great sales tool -- my sister walked out of there yesterday with a new computer ($14 Supergo wireless - NICE!) plus some other stuff (plus some stuff from the week before when they dropped the bikes off) -- so you'd think at least they could make a whole-hearted attempt towards throwing the bike in the workstand and running it through the gears. There was *no way* they did as the chain absolutely refused to drop to granny.

But like I mentioned, it was no big deal -- took all of 5 minutes for me to undo what the shop and some untrained mechanic took a week to screw up.
 

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Hopefully...

..it was a lesson learned on both parts (hers and yours). Hers to listen to you and let you do the wrenching, and yours to be more persistent with your sis regarding her bike.
 

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Ah, the "free tune-up" rant I've held inside for 10 years...
My friend bought a new bike from Backcountry Bikes in Tahoe City, CA, a long time ago (college days back in 95, and I think the shop was called something else, was under the same ownership), and I offered to tune it up for him, but he wanted to get his "free" tuneup. Fine.

So I see him a few days later and ask how it went. Turns out it cost him 15 bucks! Yeah, what he did not know what this: while the tuneup was free, the cables and housing weren't. Say what???

Yep, the mechs, in their wisdom, decided the new bike needed new stuff, and didn't tell him in the sale that parts were extra. So what is so free about the new-bike purchase??? I guess if your bike hasn't been ridden one foot, and the mechanics can't say, "Wow, I could tell you cable stretch is normal but we're going to replace them anyway," then it's free. Who knew new housing had to be purchased when a cable was replaced after being "damaged" for a month (insert sarcasm).

After that incident, I did not recommend that shop to anyone.
 

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Derailleurless
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9,122 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Brace1 said:
..it was a lesson learned on both parts (hers and yours). Hers to listen to you and let you do the wrenching, and yours to be more persistent with your sis regarding her bike.
Don't get me wrong, I love my sister and don't mind helping out with occasional maintenance, but for routine stuff like derailleur adjustments I believe it pays to be self-reliant. I'll be happy to teach her and her BF the fine art of drivetrain tweaking if they show an interest, but between the 5 bikes my wife and I have plus helping out with other friend's bikes here and there, I don't need another "regular customer", if you know what I mean.

I'm sure that as we ride together more and she sees how quick and easy the trailside tuning can be, she'll begin to question losing the bike for a week at a time to her (real) LBS and will ask for pointers as how to do it herself.
 
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