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If you know you'll be making a bunch of adjustments on the ride, bringing regular allen wrenches makes sense. But once everything is set, the multitool is compact and light for just in case use and is probably the better tool.

It's like if I plan to make fork or shock pressure adjustments to dial it in on a ride I carry my pump with me, otherwise leave it in the trunk of my just in case.
 

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Self Appointed Judge&Jury
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If you know you'll be making a bunch of adjustments on the ride, bringing regular allen wrenches makes sense. But once everything is set, the multitool is compact and light for just in case use and is probably the better tool.

It's like if I plan to make fork or shock pressure adjustments to dial it in on a ride I carry my pump with me, otherwise leave it in the trunk of my just in case.
Yep, exactly how I roll.
 

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MTBR Member since 2001...
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I still carry a multitool. it fits in the palm of your hand and weighs ounces. Mine save someones bacon every few rides. Its in a seat pouch, I always have it and never think about it. Tire levers are handy too, one is all you need. I don't do slime.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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There are some parts on a bike where a multi-tool won't fit...but those are just crappy designed bikes/parts.
 

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For my main rigs, I currently have crank bros m19 for two bikes and 1up edc/pump on the third. Haven’t taken the time to compare weights between each but they tick all the boxes, m2-m8 t25 and a chain breaker. This thread makes me curious if i would save any weight by switching to individuals instead of a multi tool. Although higher priority for me is no pack/ only frame storage. So maybe a mini bit system would be a better alternative.
 

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I must say, using short allen wrenches on a large bodied tool is a real pita. The tool is inconvenient to use because the large body is always in the way. On top of the bulk issue, the allen keys all rotate out of the tool for use and also rotate when I don't want them too. There are some bolts where I have only a quarter turn or so before the body of the multitool hits the brake lever or the dropper lever.
FWIW I have bought quite a few multitools in search for perfection (e.g. see my disappointing review of daysaver). And settled on spurcycle tool being most handy. Hope somebody else doing a research sees this post and likes the spurcycle tool too.
 

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I've carried a topeak multitool for several years now but have used it very little. I've used it to break a chain when I munched my derailleur too allow two miles of pleasurable walk a bike but not for much more. Recently, I've been trying newer swept back handlebars (no winner yet). To get the position right, I've been adjusting the bar angle and, of course, the brake and dropper locations using the multitool during rides.

I must say, using short allen wrenches on a large bodied tool is a real pita. The tool is inconvenient to use because the large body is always in the way. On top of the bulk issue, the allen keys all rotate out of the tool for use and also rotate when I don't want them too. There are some bolts where I have only a quarter turn or so before the body of the multitool hits the brake lever or the dropper lever.

I am now carrying four long allen keys, a chain breaker, a small pair of folding pliers that I've always carried anyway, two cleat screws, and a derailleur hanger and it still weights less than the multitool. I don't use the knife on the multitool any because it is too small and doesn't lock. I carry a 4" folding and locking knife anyway to defend against mountain lions so the knife in the multitool is superfluous.

Perhaps someday I'll have a problem that my ad hoc kit won't fix that the multitool would. So far, the absolute worst thing to fix on the road is a flat that requires using a tube. The Maxis minions do not like to separate from the WTB scrapers and I may not be able to do this on the road at all, but the multitool is not helpful for this kind of repair.

I usually ride in county and state parks that have loops of not more the 6 miles so at the worse, I have a 3 mile walk back to the car. I carry nothing but my phone, a water bottle and some Clif Bloks and maybe an energy bar either on the bike (bottle) or stuffed in a pocket. I hadn't used the tools I used to carry in decades except for fixing a flat and with tubeless, I haven't had a flat in years. Maybe decades.

Only on the rare extended ride do I stuff extras in a backpack.

I carry more on my roadbike where flats are a greater possibility and I may be miles from home base. Even there, my phone is my best tool. I can always call my wife for a ride home.
 

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I do like to carry a seperate chain tool. First time I used the integrated chaintool in a Crank Bros multitool the thing broke. The Park mini is a good choice to keep in your hydration pack. For multitools, this Blackburn tool is slick. It has regular L-shaped allen keys in the common sizes and everything else you need. Wayside Multi-Tool | Blackburn
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Inspector Gadget
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This is what I’ve been carrying. Compact and ‘just enough’ bits to fix most common issues. The chain breaker actually works and has a plug kit in that part. I use it all the time riding with kids as high school coach. It never fit in my carbon ENVE bars easily. So I cut the ends off the holders and put it in my lizard skin frame strap, with tube, lever and co2. Then I move the strap from bike to bike.





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I no longer roll with a Camelback--too hot for me unless its going to be a really big ride of 40 plus miles. I haven't tried a waist style pack. Even on rides of up to 30 miles I don't miss carrying all that water, which brings me to the point of this conversation.

I put a Crank Bros Multi 17 tool into a Wolf Tooth B-RAD TekLite Roll-Top bag along with a Tubolito, some light weight tire levers, two large CO2 canisters with a valve, and a small folding wrench. That whole affair weighs maybe 1/2 to 3/4 of a pound. The bag is velcro mounted to a Wolf Tooth B-Rad mounting base. This allows my full size water bottle to be a little further up the down tube, which I like, and the bag is below near the bottom bracket. I put the bag on whatever bike is going out. If the ride is longer than one water bottle, I carry a small 1/2 L collapsible Camelback water bag and put it in the hidden pockets on my bib shorts underneath my jersey. (By the way, Pactimo makes some really good bib shorts/liners with pockets on the back of them!) I am more of a minimalist adventurer.

If I am making adjustments on the bike, the ride isn't going to be very long probably anyway, so I just bring the bigger stuff with me for a quick 8-10 mile ride to get it all set. In this case I bring an empty Camelback with the tools in it.
 

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Sounds like most of you make good use of your onboard tools, I got this little guy for $15 about 4 years ago and I think I've maybe used it 3 or 4 times during that period.

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So far it's been perfect for me.
 

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There are some parts on a bike where a multi-tool won't fit...but those are just crappy designed bikes/parts.
And that's what got me to the Fixit Sticks. Multitools that won't fit into the space. Not sure I'd call them crappy designed bikes/parts, though. There's always going to be a fastener somewhere that's difficult to reach, or in a tight spot where a clunky handle isn't going to work, or in an application where you need to tighten it more than a crappy little mini tool will let you. The thing that kills the utility of most multitools, IMO, are excessively short reach for the tool (that Bondhus actually gives good reach, but some of the others linked - yikes) and a chunky handle that doesn't let you turn the fastener enough within the space you have.

FWIW I have bought quite a few multitools in search for perfection (e.g. see my disappointing review of daysaver). And settled on spurcycle tool being most handy. Hope somebody else doing a research sees this post and likes the spurcycle tool too.
While I love my spurcycle bell, that tool - I can't even. So it's kinda like the fixit sticks except it's unnecessarily made of Ti (and therefore unnecessarily expensive) and it's too short? Gotcha. For that money, I'd rather buy this: T-Ratchet Kit – SILCA
 

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Out spokin'
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FWIW I have bought quite a few multitools in search for perfection (e.g. see my disappointing review of daysaver). And settled on spurcycle tool being most handy. Hope somebody else doing a research sees this post and likes the spurcycle tool too.
Okay, that Spurcycle tool is over the top awesome... definitely one of those 'might have to get one even tho I don't need one' gizmos. (Kinda like their bell, which I have.)
=sParty
 

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While I love my spurcycle bell, that tool - I can't even. So it's kinda like the fixit sticks except it's unnecessarily made of Ti (and therefore unnecessarily expensive) and it's too short? Gotcha. For that money, I'd rather buy this: T-Ratchet Kit – SILCA
I forgot I used to have the pair of Ti Action Tek allen keys with four intergrated bits. They were insanely light. I have no idea where they are now. It isn't something I'd buy but I won them in a raffle twentysomething years ago.
 
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