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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's a good XC use tire that would beat a WTB weirwolf tire in terms of rolling resistance and weight? Would it make a big difference? Or would there be more to gain from a new wheelset over the current WTB SX-24/joy-tech hubs that came with my bike?
 

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I generally see what other riders are riding on in the area, when I am looking for tires. Maybe ask the folks at your local shop what they recommend.

There is a lot to gain in both of those areas with your current setup, depending on which version of the weirwolf you have. Just depends on how much you are looking to spend. Tires are the cheapest way to make a noticeable difference.
 

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Ther are a virtual...

ton of different tires out there that would fit the bill. However, to gain something you usually end up giving up something as well. In most cases to get lighter weight you are giving up some durability, width, and/or volume. To get lower rolling resistance the trade off is often traction. It's almost always a compromise, and the compromise that works for me and the conditions that I ride in may well not work for you and where you ride.

ncfisherman had the best advice. See what XC riders in your area are using, and/or talk with the folks at the LBS. This is often going to get you the best advice for a specific tire that will work for your local tails.

A pretty good all a round tire that I've been using lately is the Continental Mountain King 2.2". They do well in most conditions, roll quite fast and weigh in at 590g for the folding bead model. Actual width is 2.15 at the tread so they're close to claimed width. They're not as fast as some racing tires on hardpack, but they are quite respecatable in that department.

But I'd deffinately look into what's being used on your local trails.

Good Dirt
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Asking around the trails won't help too much... there's barely anyone there now that it's barely above freezing everyday. lol.

I feel like my bike doesn't quite roll as fast as my old trek singletrack 930. They have <2" wide tires. Could it also be due to the quality of the hubs?

The only other issue I've run into during fall/winter is that my tires can't grip well over roots since they're moist and/or covered in mud. This is probably a problem with any tire I'm assuming.

Would a new wheelset not make as much of a difference as different tires or is it simply not the cheapest thing to do?
 

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You can generally lose a lot more weight by changing tyres and tubes. than you can wheelsets and a lot more cheaply at that.

A cheap no name rim will be 500 grams. A good, light XC rim will be 400g. So that's only 200 grams for the rims together. Hubs add a bit of weight, but as they are near the centre of the wheel the added weight isn't felt much. The best, most noticeable place to lose weight is the outside of the wheel and for MTB's tyres are the biggest change you can make.

If your Weirwolf tyres are of the wire bead, 2.1 persuasion they might be around 730g each. There are a lot of 2.1 tyres that are around 550 and under - that's almost 200g per tyre of weight you can save. There are also tubes to consider - a heavier, fatter tube can go around 220g. A lighter tube around 170g and some right down below 100g. So the weight savings are obvious.

This is only part of the story though - you need to take your terrain into account and lighter, thinner tyres will not do well if there is sharp rocks and so on. Tyres with a more supple, flexible casing tend to roll faster as they deform to the terrain and roll over surface irregularities rather than fight everything they hit. Tyre pressure also has a lot to do with that, with a softer, supple tyre tending to roll over the rough stuff than a stiffer, harder tyre.

Wet roots will see a lot of tyres slipping and sliding - the Weirwolf is a very directional tyre and on top of that the centre tread is quite ramped, which might help the tyre roll better in the direction of the tread chevrons, but won't help it grip due to the gripping edges being ramped rather than having an edge to garb onto surfaces.

Maybe look for a rear tyre that is a bit less ramped and a bit less directional, and a bit lighter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That's a lot of good info there sideknob. I talked to a tech and they said the tires on my bike are 'clincher' type tires (I haven't looked myself since I've never had to take them off). Are these what you would call your standard tubed tire?

http://www.wtb.com/products/tires/allmountain/weirwolf/

The GMS on my tires is 49/54, so I can only assume they're either the Race or Comp versions. Are there any physical mounting differences between the two types or are they just two different levels of price/performance?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So it's a high-end / low-end kind of deal.

I'm looking at the wtb site and the 2.1 comp weirwolf is 610g (assuming the comp is what the oem put on my bike). Tack on a 170g tube and it's 780g per wheel.

If I went with the lighter race at 545g and a lighter tube at ~100g, it would be 645g per wheel. A savings of 135g per wheel at best. Am I doing this right? Where did you get your 730g figure for the weirwolfs sideknob?
 

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That's for the basic, wire beaded version. I got a set for my son's bike from an online retailer here and 730g was their figure, they certainly seem heavier than my folding bead XC rubber.

There's normally about 80 - 100g weight difference between wire beaded tyres, all else being equal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I thought the weirwolf comp was the wire beaded version. It's 610g claimed on the site. Is there another version out there?

So is 100g saved per wheel something you'd notice right off the bat?
 

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I got the Continental Race King 2.2 Supersonic, which is pretty big, very light (470 grams), and grips decently. I'm using ~120-gram Specialized Turbo Ultralight tubes and Stan's Yellow Tape for rim strips (10 grams for 2 wheels' worth), with fairly light rims (Mavic X517, about 400 grams).

These tires are nice. Before, I had 600-gram WTB MutanoRaptor Race 2.4's, almost the same casing volume. The Continentals climb easier, accelerate better, corner better & more predictably. They seem to have a lot less "basketball" rebound off of roots & rocks, too. They're not good in wet slithery snow, however ;) Anyway, I read up on the Race King SS 2.2 in this thread and ended up getting them from Phattire.com for $90-ish shipped.
 

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mechBgon said:
I got the Continental Race King 2.2 Supersonic, which is pretty big, very light (470 grams), and grips decently. I'm using ~120-gram Specialized Turbo Ultralight tubes and Stan's Yellow Tape for rim strips (10 grams for 2 wheels' worth), with fairly light rims (Mavic X517, about 400 grams).
Any problems with pinch flats? I just ordered some tires and was going to get the continental mountain kings, but heard they pinch flat easily.
 

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ncfisherman said:
Any problems with pinch flats? I just ordered some tires and was going to get the continental mountain kings, but heard they pinch flat easily.
No pinch flats on mine yet. It sounds like the Race King 2.2 SS is as big as the Mountain King 2.4, so it has enough volume that you can run relatively low pressure, letting them wrap around stuff a bit. The casing is really supple, so if the air pressure isn't sufficient to keep the rim off the rocks, the casing itself won't provide any resistance to collapse, but I think that's true for most normal XC tires.
 

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You have to be careful when basing your decisions on published tire weights. Most tires I've purchased end up weighing more than the published weight, some a LOT MORE (like 200 grams more). Some manufacturers are better than others, and some online sellers weigh them themselves (providing much more accurate weights).
 

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All tires are compromises. You need to figure out which characteristics you are most interested in (light weight, fast rolling, deep grippy tread, mud shedding ability, etc). No one tire does them all. From the description of the trails you ride, I personally wouldn't put "fast rolling" as my #1 requirement.
Although, if you are riding the stock tires that came with your bike, my experience has been that stock tires suck big time. They are often heavier and made with inferior tread compounds (I don't know this for fact, but that's the only way I can explain the crappy ride I've experienced with stock tires I've had). So any decent aftermarket tire is probably going to be an improvement.
 
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