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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After stripping out all my allen trying to take off my rotor bolts, I'm looking for some allen that will hold up to torque. I had some Craftsman allens. Junk. They twisted, they stripped up/rounded out. Are there any hardened steel allens out there?

BTW, I had to finally use a Craftsman Hand Impact Driver to break the bond on those rotor bolts. Amazing, useful tool for those stubborn, frozen bolts/screws.
 

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Harmonius Wrench
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The right tool for the job

myitch said:
After stripping out all my allen trying to take off my rotor bolts, I'm looking for some allen that will hold up to torque. I had some Craftsman allens. Junk. They twisted, they stripped up/rounded out. Are there any hardened steel allens out there?

BTW, I had to finally use a Craftsman Hand Impact Driver to break the bond on those rotor bolts. Amazing, useful tool for those stubborn, frozen bolts/screws.
It sounds like the right tool for the job was used last instaed of first. You would have likely done the same thing to a SnapOn or Bondhus allen key, as well.

For what it's worth, I am a shop mechanic and have been using the same set of Craftsman allen keys since the summer of 2002 with nary a problem. They get used every day. The other tools suggested here a definitely worthy, but in the case of a slightly frozen, or heavily Loc-tite slathered rotor bolt, the tool you used last should be used first.
 

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Guitar Ted said:
It sounds like the right tool for the job was used last instaed of first. You would have likely done the same thing to a SnapOn or Bondhus allen key, as well.

For what it's worth, I am a shop mechanic and have been using the same set of Craftsman allen keys since the summer of 2002 with nary a problem. They get used every day. The other tools suggested here a definitely worthy, but in the case of a slightly frozen, or heavily Loc-tite slathered rotor bolt, the tool you used last should be used first.
Also when using a hand impact tool on a hub, make sure you are not putting any load on the hub bearings, support the hubshell with wooden or plastic blocks. The impact from the hand impact tool could cause pitting of the bearing races so don't let the hub axle or QR end take the load. I use the Bondhus hex key wrenches they seem to hold up well.

Erik,

Balle Racing
www.balleracing.com
 

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EDR
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myitch said:
After stripping out all my allen trying to take off my rotor bolts, I'm looking for some allen that will hold up to torque. .
I just reread this...are you certain your rotor bolts are allen head and not torx bit? I ask caus mine are torx bit. Not to infer you don't know what the heck i'm talking about but who knows...so...torx bit heads look similar to allen heads but more like a 'star' pattern. Using an allen key on those would cetainly end up in a stripped bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, the impact wrench did not go over the bearings, only the rotor bolts, which are not in contact at all with the bearings.

and yes, they are definitely allens, thanks for making sure. in the case of my frozen rotor bolts, im not sure torx would have been any better since the threads were very locked in. the impact driver did a great job though.
 

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Formerly DMR For Life
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myitch said:
Yeah, the impact wrench did not go over the bearings, only the rotor bolts, which are not in contact at all with the bearings.

and yes, they are definitely allens, thanks for making sure. in the case of my frozen rotor bolts, im not sure torx would have been any better since the threads were very locked in. the impact driver did a great job though.
proto available from acklands grainger or here if your in canada is basically the same quality of snap-on but available for a lot less
DMR
 

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myitch said:
Yeah, the impact wrench did not go over the bearings, only the rotor bolts, which are not in contact at all with the bearings.
I think you missed his point: he was referring to the pressure you may have placed on the bearings on the other side of the hub to the rotor bolts. This would happen if you did not keep the axle or quick release off the floor or bench that you were working on.

Wombat
 

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myitch said:
After stripping out all my allen trying to take off my rotor bolts, I'm looking for some allen that will hold up to torque. I had some Craftsman allens. Junk. They twisted, they stripped up/rounded out. Are there any hardened steel allens out there?

BTW, I had to finally use a Craftsman Hand Impact Driver to break the bond on those rotor bolts. Amazing, useful tool for those stubborn, frozen bolts/screws.
Be a bit careful--I have snapped a stem bolt using a long-handled, high-torque allen wrench. (I once broke a clavicle due to a loose stem.)

My advice is to replace those tools often, or you risk stripping bolts.
 

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Wombat said:
I think you missed his point: he was referring to the pressure you may have placed on the bearings on the other side of the hub to the rotor bolts. This would happen if you did not keep the axle or quick release off the floor or bench that you were working on.

Wombat
Yes you are correct, that was what I ment. You want the load transmitted through the hub shell only, not through the hub shell to the bearings to the axle on the opposite side of the hub to the floor or bench.

Erik

Balle Racing
www.balleracing.com
 
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