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I've never ridden clipless, tried it a couple times and wasn't so sure I felt comfortable. Well, with my new bike I feel like my skill level and confidence has risen to the point that I'm considering taking the clipless plunge. I'm not on a real strict budget but would like to keep it reasonable and don't need the absolute lightest, most perfectly machined piece out there. Something that works and is worth the price I have no problem paying for. Finally, I have wide feet and was wondering what shoes you guys think I should check out.

thanks,

amir :cool:
 

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bang
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ZAMIRZ said:
I've never ridden clipless, tried it a couple times and wasn't so sure I felt comfortable. Well, with my new bike I feel like my skill level and confidence has risen to the point that I'm considering taking the clipless plunge. I'm not on a real strict budget but would like to keep it reasonable and don't need the absolute lightest, most perfectly machined piece out there. Something that works and is worth the price I have no problem paying for. Finally, I have wide feet and was wondering what shoes you guys think I should check out.

thanks,

amir :cool:
something from shimano (such as the M520 or M540) would be a good place to start. their pedals have adjustable cleat tension, so you can set it to release easy while you get used to them. practice in a grassy field; you *will* fall over. search the forum for more info; this question has been asked befor.
 

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TIME A.T.A.C. pedals

These are one of the few components of my bike that never require maintenance and always work flawlessly. They've taken numerous hits against rocks, gravel, etc. but they keep working. Clipless takes time getting used to, and you'll fall a lot in the beginning (if you're anything like me), but these pedals won't let you down when you learn to use them properly. The cleats let you choose between 7 and 14 degree (I think) release angles.

From what I've gathered on this site, the two best pedals out there are the Crank Bros. Eggbeaters and the Time A.T.A.C.s. I haven't used Shimano but they seem more complex in design.
 

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For cheap you can't beat the half clipless half platforms that Supergo and I think Nashbar are selling for $thirtysomething. I'm using the ones Supergo sells and love them, for terrain you're uscertain of your skill level on you just unclip and use the platform side. They also work very well for urban area with heavy congestion. The only real downside is that you have to develope a foot motion to turn the clipless side up before clipping in. I learned on some Wellgo's that were also half and half, but the right side clip mechanism busted in half. Great for learning clipless and easy on the wallet as compared to a lot of stuff on the market.

For shoes, my favorite are the Shimano groove-a-saurus sandles, I got them when I was living in Phoenix and loved them, but it's a locations thing whether those will work for you or not. They're great right now, up here Alaska, but in a couple of months....
 

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Saving lives with knives.
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I just put my little bro on clippless pedals. We tried the shimano route and I also let him use my egg beaters. He found the egg beaters much easier to engage and release. The times work in a similar fashion. Couldn't help with shoes as I have very narrow feet.
 

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OldTeen
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I recently picked up a clipless pedal/shoe combo from Performance for $60 (Forte Team pedals). So far they work great, and the clip tension adjustment is very easy. My strong advice for any new pedal is to set the adjustment tension LOOSE at first. Not being able to get your feet out of a falling bike is :(
 

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Sofa King We Todd Did
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I recently made the leap to clipless and couldn't be happier with a) my leap to clipless, b) my choice of clipless pedals. I went with the most basic version of Eggbeaters. You can pick up a pair at Jenson for a mere $50. Piece of cake to slap them on, easy in, easy out, not tension-anything to adjust - they're phenomenal. Took me about 2 minutes to get used to them, although I did fall over on the trail several times, but that's to be expected.

Good clipless pedals for a newbie? I say Eggbeaters.
 

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I second the votes for Eggbeaters. My first experience with clipless was using the chrome eggbeaters, and I learned to use them in no time. Now I'm using the Candy SL pedals, which give the same benefits of Eggbeaters, but with the benefit of a small platform.
 

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Another Vote For Time ATAC's

I rode Shimano pedals (older 737) for a number of years. Good, easy to learn, durable pedals, with adjustable release tension. Spindle bearings would lose their smoothness and need overhaul every couple years, cleats about the same lifespan.

The Shimano's didn't release well in mud, so I switched to Time ATAC Carbons. ATAC's release great in mud and bearings have gone a few years already with no sign of deterioration, I believe they run sealed cartridge bearings, the 737's didn't. No adjustment on release tension with the Time's though and I'd stay in the pedals during a fall. After the first few rides I learned I could custom tailor the release tension by taking metal off the cleats in small amounts using a bench grinder, until I got the release I wanted. Been happy with them ever since, only downside is that they are heavy.

Considered trying the Eggbeaters to reduce weight. But, the top and bottom release bails are integrated diagonally (see photo in post above) and hitting the ground, or a rock with the bottom side of the pedal can cause an unwanted top side release. Otherwise, reports for durability and performance on the Eggbeaters are quite good.
 
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