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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently using the flat bar that came w/my Stumpjumper. I am experiencing lower back pain. Will a riser bar help this? I don't ride too fast and need a little more comfort. Also what is a good mid priced bar to get? Do I get a low rise or high rise?
 

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2" rise

sounds like a lot to me since you're going from a flat bar.

I'd stick with something low. Like Race Face's Low Rise or Titec's Hellbent XC. I've had both and liked both. The Race Face's rise is more than the Titec's.
 

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1" Raceface Air Alloy

mbogosia said:
I am currently using the flat bar that came w/my Stumpjumper. I am experiencing lower back pain. Will a riser bar help this? I don't ride too fast and need a little more comfort. Also what is a good mid priced bar to get? Do I get a low rise or high rise?
Nice sweep and not to much rise or flare.
 

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dusty said:
angle your seat DOWN about 15-18º and do a long climb and descent. This works for a lot of people with lower back pain.
15-18 degrees?????

i would be very weary of trying this.....

you'd be riding with your seat pointed down quite far, and in my opinion flat or near flat is how a seats gotta sit.

cheaper still might be to get a stem with more rise and keep your bars. a bike shop might even have some "take-off" stems you could get for real cheap!!
 

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The $6 Tsnuami riser bar at chucksbikes.com would be a cheap way to see if a riser will help you. I put one on a just-finished SS, and it seems stout, w/ decent sweep and about 1.5" rise. If you like it, then you could spring for an Easton and keep the cheap one as a spare.
- Joe

mbogosia said:
I am currently using the flat bar that came w/my Stumpjumper. I am experiencing lower back pain. Will a riser bar help this? I don't ride too fast and need a little more comfort. Also what is a good mid priced bar to get? Do I get a low rise or high rise?
 

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I second the Titec Hellbent XC bar. I've tried two Easton Monkeylites and they made my hand hurts. The sweep was way too much for me. I put my cheap Hellbent on my Id and she's more comfortable than ever. You can get these bars really cheap too. I think I got mine for $12 a few years ago.
 

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dusty said:
This is a good deal for XC: http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product.aspx?i=HB606A03

but before you buy a new bar (or along with it) angle your seat DOWN about 15-18º and do a long climb and descent. This works for a lot of people with lower back pain.
doesn't that result in wrist/hand pain?

you don't mean 5-8 degrees do you?

seems angling the seat down is indeed a good bit of advice, i had some back pain and angled my seat down a click or 2 and it sorta spread my weight a bit more forward... 15 degrees seems pretty extreme... :eek:
 

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couple suggestions

mbogosia said:
I am currently using the flat bar that came w/my Stumpjumper. I am experiencing lower back pain. Will a riser bar help this? I don't ride too fast and need a little more comfort. Also what is a good mid priced bar to get? Do I get a low rise or high rise?
I like the Profile Ultra FR as a cheap riser. Can be had very inexpensively on line. I'd still be using this one if I'd not found the perfect bar: Titec Flattracker.

Other option...Nashbar has an inexpensive <$20 house brand riser that might be useful, at the very least, to see if you like the riding position.

-Que?
 

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Yeah...

I was wary of it the first time I heard it, but some poking around on the web turned up a few things in support of it, including a couple of exercise physiology studies, one of which compared it to other ways of trying to alleviate low back pain while cycling (both road and mountain) and angling the seat nose down a bit was by far the most effective method statistically (the angle may vary by rider physiology, of course, and a little less may work for you--I measured my current WTB (Tri Lite) and it's about 10º off horizontal measured from the middle of the saddle). I didn't save that link, but have this one:

http://bjsm.bmjjournals.com/cgi/reprint/33/6/398.pdf

If you search you should find more references, although you will also find a lot of contradictory info, both about seat angle and bar height. I can tell you, though, that after years of moderate post (and during) ride back pain, this fixed it for me.

The key I think is to get a good balance in downward saddle tilt. If you're sliding forward so much that you are over-using arm and upper back muscles then that becomes a problem, but the typical "flat" saddle adjustment can cause just enough discomfort to make you rotate your hips back a bit and hold them in that position for most of your ride, causing low back soreness. Part of the reason this happens is that virtually all saddles (I'm looking at my spare WTB Rocket V as I write this) are built so that if the middle area of the saddle is flat the nose actually RISES a bit moving toward the front of the saddle. The more the nose rises, the more you need to angle the saddle downward. I have a fi'zi:k Dolomiti that has no nose rise at all, and if you mount it with the rails perfectly level to the ground the saddle itself gives you about a 12º drop angle from the middle part of the saddle (this is important since simply laying a straight-edge along a saddle with a high rear makes it LOOK like it angles downward, but that flat area in the middle is actually horizontal and the nose still rises up as you move forward), so fi'zi:k knows about this and is actually building the adjustment into some of their saddles. For me, dropping the nose eliminated 90% of my low back pain the first ride after I made the adjustment. You may also want to raise the bar, shorten the stem and/or do some isometric sit-ups (or crunches, whatever you want to call them) for both your abs and lateral obliques, as well as work your lower back muscles right before you ride, that way you start out "pumped." Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well I went to see if I could adjust my seat angle and the only adjustment I could make was slideing it forward or back. It was exactly in the middle. I moved it forward about 1/4 to 1/2" and am going to try it tommorow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It is a Ritchey. It came with my Specialized M4 stumpjumper. I am starting to wonder if I should try spacers or a new stem. I am new to this but assume that spacers go on the stem to raise everything up. I noticed that when I get on flat straight aways I like to sit up and ride on my finger tips to relax my back.
 

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Ok

but get a riser bar. Your fork has already been cut, so you can't make it longer to add spacers under your stem. You can get a steeper stem, though (see this for example:

http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?...rand=&sku=6217&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=

although as you orignially guessed, a riser bar will help. What's your stem length and rise now? If you think your extension forward is correct and just want height get a slightly longer stem with high rise. And you should be able to angle your seat downward. Even the cheapest seatposts allow this. Loosen everything up more and see if you can change the angle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Went to the LBS b4 my ride and asked him about a riser. He looked at my bike and said it was meant for hard riding and a riser bar would not help. I said ok and went for a ride. Well, sure enough 30-45 minutes into it and my back is killing! I am gonna order one online and try it. It has got to relieve some of the tension on my back.
 

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Cockpit length is the key

I had same back pain the first month with my new Fisher Sugar due to its 'Genesis' long cockpit length, I tried flat bar, riser bar, spacer, seat location, and finally got a shorter stem and solved the problem. It's not a good idea to move only the seat forward, because the stem plays a rather important role for the stretch and bend of your body. If the new riser won't help, try a shorter stem (20mm shorter will make a big difference),
 
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