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Please bear with me, I know it’s probably been answered before, and maybe it should be pinned but I jus5 got my new 2021 Specialized Chisel, it’s tubeless ready, and I wanna go tubeless. I need valves, and tape and I am gonna use Orange Seal as my sealant. Wondering what valve size to get and any brands that are more reliable and make the conversion easier? I have read the Orange Seal valves are not the most desirable. Should I go Specialized? Muc Off? Length of valve? Also any tape that’s better than others? also I have 500 miles on these tires now, Specialized Fast Trak Control, should I get new tires? Not sure how long these will last and I don’t wanna do the conversion only to have to replace the tires in a few months.
 

· high pivot witchcraft
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Muc Off valves are slightly oversized, diameter-wise. I have them on two bikes. All 4 valves make getting a pump head on and off truly a PITA. I am hoping they don't destroy my floor pump.

My advice is to avoid. They look nice, but are crazily oversized, for some bizarre reason. Once you manage to muscle it on, the threads grip a floor pump head like the jaws of a pit bull.

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As for tape, I have used Whiskey rim tape with great success. First thing I replace on We Are One wheels, which seem to come equipped with packing tape.

100% endorse the use of Orange Seal Endurance for 3 season riding. Orange Seal Sub-Zero for winter riding.

Investing in good solid tire levers is key.

We Are One wheels don't require anything but a floor pump. They magically seat themselves automatically. I have one of these but I haven't had to use it on any We Are One wheelset:

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I'm not talking about the method used in the Syd and Macky video that has been posted countless times here. No need to remove the valve core and seat the tire half way around with a lever. People with We Are Ones know what I am talking about - you put the tire on and kaboom. It magically seats itself just like that. A couple of pops using a floor pump and you are good to go.

Otherwise, with other wheel sets, consider buying the high volume pump above. I think mine was $60.

I am sure others have different preferences (Gorilla tape) and tricks and tips (including the Syd and Macky floor pump method, if you are not inclined to spend the $60 for the high volume pump above).
 

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Muc Off valves are slightly oversized, diameter-wise.
I like this about the Muc Off valves because I seat the tire then inject sealant through the valve stem. The first few I did I used Stan's valves and my sealant 'injector' can't get past the rubber flange at the bottom of the valve. With Muc Off it slides all the way in and injecting the sealant is super easy.
 

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I'll also second Muc-Off valves for being easy to use with injecting sealant in... makes life much less messy.

I previously had generic valves but these always leaked eventually. I switched to muc-off and have had no problems since. I like that they come with different rubber grommet shapes (I've used 2 out of 3 so far on my rims) and the valve core removal cap is a nice touch.

I've used both Stans and Muc-Off rim tape and both work fine, though the Muc-Off stuff is much thinner and feels a bit tougher. Same goes for the sealant; both appear to work and don't dry out, but I've found the Muc-Off to seal up new sidewalls quite a bit quicker than the Stans.

I do all my seating with a standard floor pump and inner tube, and it's worked on all tyres except one, so I'd say don't invest in specialist tubeless pumps or compressors unless you find you really need it.
 

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I do all my seating with a standard floor pump and inner tube
I've never quite understood this approach, because you have to unseat one side of the tire to get the tube out, and some tires are such a tight fit you need to unseat both sides to give yourself enough play to get one side off the rim.

I have many uses for a compressor, so I have one, but given how much we all spend on bike related stuff $50 - $100 for a small compressor from Harbor Freight or similar seems like an absolute no brainer, even if you only use it to seat tires and pump up car tires etc... Add a blower nozzle and then you can clean/dry parts of your bike that would normally be a real pain.
 

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I've never quite understood this approach, because you have to unseat one side of the tire to get the tube out, and some tires are such a tight fit you need to unseat both sides to give yourself enough play to get one side off the rim.

I have many uses for a compressor, so I have one, but given how much we all spend on bike related stuff $50 - $100 for a small compressor from Harbor Freight or similar seems like an absolute no brainer, even if you only use it to seat tires and pump up car tires etc... Add a blower nozzle and then you can clean/dry parts of your bike that would normally be a real pain.
Don't get me wrong... would love a compressor :D But need to make space in my workshop first and would get a big one for air tools.

I've never had a problem seating a tyre tubeless when only one bead needs to be seated (and never had to break both beads to get a tube out), with both mtb and gravel tyres (the latter being super difficult to get the bead on the rim for me).

Only time I needed a compressor was being lazy and not using inner tube method. Plus, using the inner tube method is also great for seating the rim tape properly... saves my poor thumbs trying to flatten and de-air it.
 

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Your tires and rims should be tubeless ready. You only need to add Sealant and Valves.
I went with Stans for both but any make should work.
I also bought the Valve/Core remover for future use however you don't need it initially as it's
easier to add the sealant just before closing the last bit of tire on the rim.

I removed one side of the tire, threaded in the valve, seated 3/4 of the tire, added sealant, fully seated the tire
and added air with a floor pump.
It was far easier than I was expecting and my tires seem to hold air fine as I only need to add a few PSI/week.
 

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Hi,
Tubeless rims are more reliable than tubeless-ready rims because they do not require any tape. Riders who swap tires on and off regularly will appreciate not having to worry about re-taping. You get a nice tight seal, and the only hole that you need to worry about is the valve hole.
 

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I have both Stan's and E13 valves. They both function correctly so far, but the E13 valves were not compatible with the sealant injector that I have (also Stans) and I didn't find out until I went to screw it onto the valve with sealant already in it. That was annoying.
 

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I use the Muc-Off valves as well, absolutely love them. For tape I use DT Swiss, but when that runs out I will be giving the Muc-Off a try as well. Orange Seal on the sealant. I, like others, recommend a cheap compressor. I have one from Makita and it's been a game changer. I previously had that Specialized air canister and it stopped working after 2 tries (would literally not release all the air when connected to the valve, no matter which I tried).
 

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I always use the Problem Solvers P-Nut. I hate trying to tighten those little tiny knurled nuts that come with all of the other stems. The P-Nut makes it about a thousand times easier to get it tight, and is nice trailside if you have to take your stem out to tube a tire.
 

· high pivot witchcraft
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I always use the Problem Solvers P-Nut. I hate trying to tighten those little tiny knurled nuts that come with all of the other stems. The P-Nut makes it about a thousand times easier to get it tight, and is nice trailside if you have to take your stem out to tube a tire.
I have seen more than one biker stranded this year on the trail who couldn't get that nut unscrewed because their LBS likely used a wrench to tighten it. Likely because there was a leak at the valve and they didn't feel like addressing it so they torqued the eff out of the nut.
 

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I have seen more than one biker stranded this year on the trail who couldn't get that nut unscrewed because their LBS likely used a wrench to tighten it. Likely because there was a leak at the valve and they didn't feel like addressing it so they torqued the eff out of the nut.
Muc-Off valves have a 4mm hex 'head' on the base of the stem so you can undo with your multitool once the tire is of the rim.
 

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I run specialized wheels and I have never been able to get the Specialized tubeless valves to work. Maybe someone has, but that someone is not me. On the other hand, when I used Stan's valves, it sealed immediately with a hand pump.

I have found both the Specialized Fast Traks and Renegades to last a long time. I've got probably over 1400 off-road miles on a Renegade as a rear tire which is amazing. When relatively new, these tires will seal up very easily with just a hand-pump (as long as you are using Stan's and not Specialized valves lol). When the tires get old and the sidewalls get weaker, they are harder to seal with a hand-pump. I recently put that old Renegade on another wheel and had to pump really fast to get it to seal finally. It was much harder than when the tire was new but not impossible.

I use DT Swill rim tape. One application has lasted me two seasons so far and the tape still looks new.
 

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Hi,
Tubeless rims are more reliable than tubeless-ready rims because they do not require any tape. Riders who swap tires on and off regularly will appreciate not having to worry about re-taping. You get a nice tight seal, and the only hole that you need to worry about is the valve hole.
Who makes tubeless rims these days that do not require tape or some kind of rim strip like Bontrager?
 

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I have seen more than one biker stranded this year on the trail who couldn't get that nut unscrewed because their LBS likely used a wrench to tighten it.
I don't know anyone that uses a wrench to tighten these. But if you do it as often as most shop guys do, you get good at making them tighter by hand than the average desk jockey or reference librarian can undo.

Add the teeniest bit of dried sealant onto the threads and voila -- frustration.

I second the suggestion for the P Nuts. I mostly use them in winter but can't see a good reason not to use them in summer.
 

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