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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've heard that tube-style rims can be easily converted to tubeless setups. It has something to do with using a 20" tube for the liner of the rim, and also putting some kind of goo into the tube tire to help seal it. How is this actually done? If ya have a link to the process, I'd appreciate it.
 

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jtomasik said:
I've heard that tube-style rims can be easily converted to tubeless setups. It has something to do with using a 20" tube for the liner of the rim, and also putting some kind of goo into the tube tire to help seal it. How is this actually done? If ya have a link to the process, I'd appreciate it.
it's a delicate tube cutting process....though i've tried it a couple of times and never have had any luck. I eventually broke down and did UST tires/rims with stans sealant....never had a problem, and they've seen hell. I'm told it's more of a temporary fix or for a bike that isn't going to be used as aggressively. The goo you would use would definitely be stan's tire sealant...or homemade stans which is more or less watered down liquid latex which you can procure at any craft store.

anyway, hope that helps. With any luck someone who's been able to sucessfully get this tubeless system to work will chime in.
 

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Why so uptite?
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i have seen some people have success with the homemade tubeless. Personally i have never tried. But if you can afford it save yourself some time and frustration and get a tubeless rim setup. Again this is assuming you have theextra cash to rebuild you wheels to just buy a tubeless wheelset. The Mavic Crossland is always on sale and makes a simple UST wheelset and it is both rim and disc compatable.

Also i always use a little Stans in my Tubeless tires and it works great!
 

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EBG 18T said:
But if you can afford it save yourself some time and frustration and get a tubeless rim setup. Again this is assuming you have theextra cash to rebuild you wheels to just buy a tubeless wheelset. The Mavic Crossland is always on sale and makes a simple UST wheelset and it is both rim and disc compatable.
Speaking of which, John, should you decide you're interested in the AC - I'll throw a tubeless freeride wheelset in, in lieu of the wheelset on there now. Just thought I'd throw that out there.

You definitely don't want to run tubeless without Stan's - things will seem just great, up until you run over a goat-head on the trail and can't locate the hole to patch it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok, Josh. Thanks. I'll keep that in mind. If I don't choose the AC, I hope one day we can hook up and ride sometime. Of course I'll need a couple of months before I take off my training wheels. Oh, lemme know if you'd consider selling your unicycle.
 

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jtomasik said:
I've heard that tube-style rims can be easily converted to tubeless setups. It has something to do with using a 20" tube for the liner of the rim, and also putting some kind of goo into the tube tire to help seal it. How is this actually done? If ya have a link to the process, I'd appreciate it.
I bought the Stans No tube system for both my XC and FR (wider rim strip) bikes after friends raved about how good it was working on their bikes. After one month and loads of problems with tires that won't seat and holes that won't seal I threw them away. The friends that once raved about them also threw them away in time suffering the same problems I did.

If you were considering going this route I would strongly recommend investing in UST tires as well. They have thicker sidewalls and are less prone to puncture.

Even though i didn't rate the stans product I was impressed with the ride quality of a tubless setup. Now I run UST rims & tires and use a splash of the stans liquid instide to seal thorn holes and the like.
 

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Actually the Process is quite easy.
I have been using tubeless for more than 2 years with great success.
I have experienced only one flat. That was a ripped open tire at Snowmass last year.
I was using the "ghetto" tubless bit with 24" Tubes and then splitting them open. Then using my own mixture of sealant. Recently I have preferred to use the Stans strips. I find that they seal much faster and no cutting is neccessary.
I use Dh 2 ply tires, but have used single play tires as well.

My Mixture for sealant is as follows:
1 part Liquid Latex
1 part fix a flat
2 parts water

I find this mixture much seals much faster than stans.

any questions, let me know.
 

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bpatterson6 said:
Actually the Process is quite easy.
I have been using tubeless for more than 2 years with great success.
I have experienced only one flat. That was a ripped open tire at Snowmass last year.
I was using the "ghetto" tubless bit with 24" Tubes and then splitting them open. Then using my own mixture of sealant. Recently I have preferred to use the Stans strips. I find that they seal much faster and no cutting is neccessary.
I use Dh 2 ply tires, but have used single play tires as well.

My Mixture for sealant is as follows:
1 part Liquid Latex
1 part fix a flat
2 parts water

I find this mixture much seals much faster than stans.

any questions, let me know.
Not that it should matter since your sealant probably doesn't contact the rim, but I thought I'd mention that I've heard (for what that's worth) that fix a flat will degrade the aluminum in rims - like if one were running UST rims and didn't have the tube protecting the rim.

I usually just mix "mold builder" (latex) and wiper fluid (which I believe makes the sealant more freeze resistant than water), until it's the consistency of egg-nog. I tried adding some glitter (bike platelets, if you will) but I'm not sure if it made a difference, seeing how the whole setup is generally trouble free anyway.
 

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Single(Pivot)and Happy
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Maxxis rim strips

and homebrew are what I roll. The Maxxis strips are excellent and way cheaper than Stans. I did the 20" tube deal, and although I never experienced a problem, I never felt 100% confident with the set-up.
 

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Godzilla said:
Not that it should matter since your sealant probably doesn't contact the rim, but I thought I'd mention that I've heard (for what that's worth) that fix a flat will degrade the aluminum in rims - like if one were running UST rims and didn't have the tube protecting the rim.
Like I said...

I have been using tubeless for more than 2 years "troublefree"...
So I'd say it's a non issue. With NON-UST Rims and Tires...
 

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Boulder Pilot said:
and homebrew are what I roll. The Maxxis strips are excellent and way cheaper than Stans. I did the 20" tube deal, and although I never experienced a problem, I never felt 100% confident with the set-up.
I prefer the Stans over the Maxxis because Maxxis only comes in "presta" valve rim strips and the cores are non removable.
Stans come in "Schraeder" Valves and is removable.
therefore, I can put the tire on and get it seated before I even put in the sealant.
Once the tire has been seated once and has been forced into place on the bead, I can remove the Core and put the sealant in place, replace the core, air it up again and let it seal. Alot less mess and alot easier IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wow, good suggestions, guys (and gals?). I just brought home the new bike (bought the Scott Nitrous 20), and I'm going to have to go "tubeless" here shortly. Of course I'm going to ride the thing on Thursday before I get a chance to set it up properly... :D ...only because I'm impatient. Hopefully I won't get a flat my first time out!
 

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My cup runneth over
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Rode Stan’s for two years and switched to the 20 inch ‘ghetto’ tubeless a little over a year ago. I find I get a better seal with the ghetto approach and can switch rims without getting new Stan’s strips. I do still use Stan’s sealant. The only problem I have had with the ghettos is that I have broken a couple of the presta valve stems which never happened with regular 26 inch presta tubes or stan’s.
 

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bpatterson6 said:
Actually the Process is quite easy.
I have been using tubeless for more than 2 years with great success.
I have experienced only one flat. That was a ripped open tire at Snowmass last year.
I was using the "ghetto" tubless bit with 24" Tubes and then splitting them open. Then using my own mixture of sealant. Recently I have preferred to use the Stans strips. I find that they seal much faster and no cutting is neccessary.
I use Dh 2 ply tires, but have used single play tires as well.

My Mixture for sealant is as follows:
1 part Liquid Latex
1 part fix a flat
2 parts water

I find this mixture much seals much faster than stans.

any questions, let me know.
Sounds like you had more luck than me. In the one month I used it got holes in the sidewalls of 3 tires (3 different brands) that the stans fluid couldn't seal, maybe your mix would have helped there as is sounds like it will be thicker. The last straw was when a tire rolled off the rim on a high speed corner and I fell off into the bushes.

Since moving to UST rims & tires I have not had a single puncture, 2 years & counting. But don't put sealant, Stans or home made in Kenda UST tires as it causes the layers of tire to seperate.
 

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SilentK said:
Sounds like a lot of work!

I'll stick with tubes....
It's not really that much work, I use the 20" tube with stans method on all my bikes, well execpt my road bike. The only time I've had a problem is when my rims are nearly shot, my rear rim (V10) now has a bunch of flat spots and dings so the ghetto tubeless no longer works too well. I'll probably have new wheels built up for next season.

I used to pinch flat all the time, not anymore!
 

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Toby said:
But don't put sealant, Stans or home made in Kenda UST tires as it causes the layers of tire to seperate.
What UST Kenda tire did you have that problem with?

No problem here yet with the UST Nevegal on the back of my BLT, but the way this thing has knobs chipping and flaking off of it after only about a half dozen rides on it, I doubt it will last long enough to have casing separations with the Stans in it. It's not sticky rubber either. I have Maxxis sticky rubber tires on other bikes and on the front of that one that are not flaking apart as bad as this Kenda, and sticky rubber wears fast. Nevegals get good reviews, but so far not impressed with this UST 2.1 as a rear tire, no better than a 62a Larsen TT. I'll probably go back to a UST Ignitor since they have a 2.1 UST version listed now.

Yeah, I run Stans in all my tires, UST or not. Too many thorns around here not to. Never had a casing separation problem due to sealer that I know of, but had a few tire types that just do not seal with any sealer, gazillions of holes in the sidewalls kept leaking sealer and bleeding down. What fine quality products tires are when the casings are so porous that they were not designed to hold air, much less sealer.

I used to put Slime in DH tubes, but the only ones it would seal thorn holes in were the Hitchinson Green DH tubes. I found Stans works better in tubes too if you have to run tubes.

Cheers,

Dave
 

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SilentK said:
Sounds like a lot of work!

I'll stick with tubes....
I run UST tubeless with Stan's (previously ran regular rims with Stan's tubeless system). After 3 years of almost constant riding, I've never had a single pinch flat, or any issues whatsoever with my tires - never once have I needed to air up on the trail. After a couple thousand trail miles, I can say without exaggeration that Stan's is the best product I've ever spent money on for my bike.

I didn't mind paying the $50 for Stan's to get the rim strips...since I only have one bike (before I went UST rims). However, I could see that getting expensive if you have a lot of rigs. Then the home-brew solution might be the way to go.
 

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mtbdirteater said:
What UST Kenda tire did you have that problem with?
It was the Kinetics. A friend had his bike in his office at work when the sidewall blew out, another friend had his blow out in his apartment in the middle of the night. Mine was kept in the garage and never blew out but did develope a number of "eggs" along the sidewall so i changed them before they failed. The heat must accelerate it.

Customer services at kenda told us that it was due to using stans in them. Their web site now says:

"ATTENTION KENDA VALUED CUSTOMERS
KENDA DOES NOT ENDORSE THE USE OF ANY FLUID BASED SEALANT PRODUCTS IN KENDA TUBE TYPE OR TUBELESS TYPE TIRES. USE OF ANY FLUID BASED PRODUCT IN KENDA TIRES WILL BE AT YOUR OWN RISK AND WILL VOID ANY WARRANTY CLAIMS.

THANK YOU!
Kenda Management"

So I don't run kendas anymore because if you can't seal a thorn hole then you're worse off than using tubes IMO. Shame, because I really liked the Kinetics tire
 
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