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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

Last week I punctured my rear tire going up a rocky jagged cliff. I decided I'd take on the project of going tubeless today.

I bought some tubeless stems on Amazon and Stans fluid. Looking at my bikes specs sheet the rims were listed as 'Tubeless Compatible'.

I went ahead and removed the inner tube and did a dry test before adding the Stans fluid to ensure all was sealed. I found that I was getting leakage from the valve stem connection. I went to my LBS to seek help and potentially buy quality valve stems (didn't know about the Amazon ones due to the leakage).

They were helpful but they ended up telling me I couldn't go tubeless with my current setup. They stated that I'd need new rims and tires altogether to make it work. They did say however, that I could seal my current rims with a thick layer of tape and get new tubeless compatible tires. Seeing as the tires are brand new that's not realistic for me right now.

I have Schwalbe Racing Ralph and Nobby Nic tires. I've found that you can go tubeless even on non tubeless ready tires but you'll need a lot more sealant to compensate for the porousness.

I have also found that they make many different versions of my tires, some TL ready and others not. Neither of my tires have any badging to say they are TL ready. Part of me wants to tape up my rims add some Stans and see what happens otherwise its a waiting game to wear out my tires...
 

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Probably worth a try to seal em up. I think everyone has some degree of leakage through the valve first shot out of the box. It can be a sign of bad tape/tape job, but a lot of valves just need some sealant help to seal up well.

I have one wheel with a "wiggly" valve that sometimes will lose air if I screw with it too much while pumping the tire. But if I tighten it back up, spin and bounce, it will hold air until I jiggle it wrong again.

Add some sealant, spin em around and bounce em a lot and see if it will seal up. Let em sit a couple of days and see what seeps through the sidewalls if anything and whether they will hold air. You've sunk the cost of a few feet of tape, sinking a few ounces of sealant is probably worth a shot.
 

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what are the rims that are reportedly tubeless compatible according to the bike's spec sheet?

Every tubeless-ready or tubeless compatible rim has to be taped to seal the spoke holes. All of them. Some require a proprietary rim strip, not not a whole lot. UST rims don't need anything, but those have become less and less common over the past several years because they are a PITA in other ways, and tubeless-ready or tubeless compatible rims work just as well with less fiddly, weird, and proprietary crap.
 

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Any leak from a sketchy tape job will show up at the valve stem, no matter where it is around the wheel.

Spinning a tire only distributes sealant around the very perimeter of the tire. To seal the sidewalls and the base of the valve stem, you need to bounce (as TwiceHorn suggests) or shake the tire vigorously while turning it. I good ride over rough ground can do it too. Sealant won't seal a bad tape job. It'll make it worse.

Depending on the details, some riders get away with unofficial tubeless setups, and some don't. There are a lot of variables between rim profiles, tires, tapes, workmanship, terrain, riding, etc.. If you're inclined to experiment and don't mind the possibility of a sudden total flat, go for it.
 

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I was going to suggest a ride, also, but that can be a leap of faith.

I see from threads on here that people have rubbed down their sidewalls (externally it appears) with superglue or rubber cement to help seal in sealant.

One thing that may be obvious, if and when you give up on the experiment, hose out the tires real good while the sealant is still wet. Having a pretty full tire with the sealant drying quickly (as when the tire goes flat after you break your collarbone and finger in a crash and don't ride for a couple of months) makes an unholy mess that will pull your tape up and glue the tire to the rim in spots and make it very difficult to remove, not to mention kludging up the bead. Ask me how I know! That won't happen to you, hopefully, but I don't think you want a couple of ounces of sealant drying in your tire if you hope to use it tubed.

My first tape job I was wary of because the Stan's tape didn't seem very sticky, despite a very clean rim, but I stretched it and it was ok by the time I got all the way around the rim. Still that initial lack of stick bothered me. I had leakage from the stem that went away, and when I changed the tire, the tape was nicely pressed down, no or few bubbles, good.
 

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As stated above, you need to apply tubeless rim tape. Push the valve stem through the tape, but lather it up first with sealant.

Everyone has their sealant preference, and I like Orange.

What you are trying to do is feasible. It is what we all did before TLR became the norm. However, some tires are a PITA, just try it and ride.

Sent from my moto x4 using Tapatalk
 

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No need to seal the valve stem. No need to glue the exterior of your tire. No need to replace the stem. Stans works just fine.

Some of that is personal preference of course. I've not had problems with Stans sealant. I didn't have great luck with the factory Specialized stems. Basic set of Stans stems in a bulk bin from my LBS works fine.

It sounds like you will need to redo the tape. You could use Gorilla Tape -but it's difficult to remove in the future.
 

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Ive got a bike that came w crappy wire bead tires and rims that had a flawed factory tape job. I carefully removed the tape and used gorilla tape over a year ago. But did mount nice tubeless ready tires. Its still holding fine. Also used gorilla tape on another non tubeless ready rim set and they are fine too. Carefully cut a perfect hole for valve stem and try. But new tires would be best. At least on the front!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the great tips everyone,

I decided to wait and wear down my current tires, reliability is important to me and I'd rather have a good set of tubeless ready tires when I do the upgrade, maybe I'll even go for carbon rims, time will tell.

I ended up returning the tubeless items anyways and used the money to buy some tools to tighten up my cassette. It came loose the other day while during a ride, doesn't reflect so well on CRC's workmanship and QC, nevertheless its all tightened up and all is good in the world again.
 

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I like to put a tube in after I tape a rim, inflate it good and tight and in my mind it is making sure the tape is good and tight. have not had a valve leak
 

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I like to put a tube in after I tape a rim, inflate it good and tight and in my mind it is making sure the tape is good and tight. have not had a valve leak
I've found this same technique to work tremendously well on tires/rim combos that won't seat before I add sealant. Although don't be in a rush if it's your only set of wheels because it will take about 2 days...

Tape and insert tube in the tire. Inflate to max pressure on the tire and let it sit for 2 days. Release the pressure from the tube and carefully remove one size of the tire being very tedious to not let the opposite side bead fully release. Remove tube and insert tubeless valve. Pop removed bead back on rim. Remove valve core for max air fill and hit with a burst from a compressor to get the tire to inflate, re-insert valve core. Use regular pump to get the beads to pop and reseal.

If the beads reseal and pop, then again let the air out and inject through the open valve stem your preferred sealant. Again hit the valve with compressed air to inflate and once aired up quickly re-insert the valve core. Pump up to max pressure, seat the beads with the confirmed pop, and bounce the wheel to spread the sealant.

Points to ponder...

I used Endurance Orange sealant, easier to clean up than Stans. Its more like rubber cement when it dries up and easy to get rid off unlike Stans.

I go cheap with 1" wide Gorilla Tape. Works VERY well but my LBS said if I have any repairs wheel wise that I WILL BE RESPONSIBLE for removing the Gorilla Tape... apparently its a SOB to remove the adhesive.

The "Pre-Tube" method has worked without fail on tire/rim combos that wouldn't otherwise seat a bead. I'm 3 for 3 in just the past week!
 

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Try using a few passes of gorilla tape around the rim (fairly cheap stuff) I use Stans but have heard really good reviews of the product Slime. Air up the tire, shake the tire, bounce the tire then go for a ride. Works every time for me. Good luck!
 

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I go cheap with 1" wide Gorilla Tape. Works VERY well but my LBS said if I have any repairs wheel wise that I WILL BE RESPONSIBLE for removing the Gorilla Tape... apparently its a SOB to remove the adhesive.
Yes it is! Just recently did it. Goo Gone turns the adhesive residue into mush and it comes off way easier. It also makes your rim smell delicious

Sent from my snail mail via Tapatalk.
 
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