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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Read and article yesterday in one of the mtb rags about dura-ace's electric shifting. It is supposedly the next big thing and sure to find offroad application. The 29er forum seems to be a home for purist and I was curious as to your thoughts/reactions?

I will post my opinions (like anyone cares) later on as not to present a leading question.
 

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Simply put: Evolution.

Faster and more precise shifting which can be a life saver on the tail end of epic rides/races.

I am all for it. Don't get me wrong I will still always own a single/fixed rigid though.

PF
 

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with electric shifting, you would never have to do adjustments because there is not cable stretch, right?
 

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is buachail foighneach me
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you would still need to adjust the high and low settings of the derailluer, and possibly the electrical current, just as you need to adjust cable tension. you would also need to change/charge batteries, and worry about moisture. mavic had an electronic shift back in the nineties didn't they? and who was the company that was jocking hydraulic shift lines back then too?

edit, nevermind. i read up on it. it's computer controlled, not just electric...
 

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nOOby said:
total BS. Maybe they'll come with those old school generators to keep them charged. The kind that rotate on the tire.

Seriously though. What good could come out of these?
A) More precise shifting.

B) No gunked up, rusting cables and housings.

C) Eliminates cross chain front derailleur rub.

D) You can switch between wheelsets without having to mess with H and L screws or adjust cable tension.

For those of us that actually race, it's a great innovation. I'm too poor right now, but the advantages ARE there.
 

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sean salach said:
you would still need to adjust the high and low settings of the derailluer, and possibly the electrical current, just as you need to adjust cable tension. you would also need to change/charge batteries, and worry about moisture. mavic had an electronic shift back in the nineties didn't they? and who was the company that was jocking hydraulic shift lines back then too?
Huh?

No. Not at all. The RD automatically "centers" itself. That's why people think this is the next great advance in shifting. The user/mechanic doesn't have to DO anything to get the system to shift FLAWLESSLY.
 

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Faster shifting via electronics is still happening via derailleurs and chain. So you still have all of the usual shortcomings. I'd much rather see Shimano spend more time trying to perfect the internal geared hub. Like all complex systems, you always create more problems with every solution. Gears are a solution, but I prefer single speeds because I don't like the trade-off - you gain efficiency but you lose reliability, predictability,simplicity, and aesthetics. The same would go for electronic shifting - you get faster shifts, but now you have to worry about whether your battery is charged and if you remembered to carry spares. Perhaps it could be proven that an electronically shifted carbon fiber full suspension bike is the fastest, most efficient bike possible, but would it be as much fun as a nice steel single speed (with or without rigid fork)? I know what my answer would be. Your answer may vary.
 

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duke of kent said:
Huh?

No. Not at all. The RD automatically "centers" itself. That's why people think this is the next great advance in shifting. The user/mechanic doesn't have to DO anything to get the system to shift FLAWLESSLY.
yep, i read up on it after i typed that. electrical and computer-controlled systems are very, very far from being free from flaws. add to that the fact that very few people are going to be able to adjust or fix these WHEN they do go haywire, which will happen every now and then.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ok, here is my take. You are using an alternate power source to improve performance. That irks me. It's a bike, a human powered machine. I know people use battery powered computers and lights to illuminate and monitor but this is different. You are gaining mechanical performance advantage from outside energy. That sucks.

However, if you are into that sort of thing the guys over at Kawasaki who have be doing it for years.
 

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anyone running Suntour BEAST?

The new "Di-2" electronic Dura-Ace reminds me a lot of Mavic's Mektronic electronic shifters. For off-road, has there been anything aside from the Suntour/Browning Electronic Automatic Shifting Transmission or "BEAST?"

I never saw a BEAST in person... can anyone comment about installation/repair/riding impressions?

http://www2.bsn.de/Cycling/articles/browning.html
 

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Its cool that Shimano keeps pushing its R&D, but I don't like how they keep pushing it on us and we buy it! I suppose Campy will have to adopt something like it to keep their 11 speed stuff working. Its getting out of hand.

Remeber how great 7 speed thumb shifters were? And if things got screwed up you could switch to friction. Has there really been any significant drivetrain progress since then?

"For those of us that actually race"... How about some of us. Some of us that actually race would like to keep things as simple as possible.
 

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2:1 said:
The new "Di-2" electronic Dura-Ace reminds me a lot of Mavic's Mektronic electronic shifters. For off-road, has there been anything aside from the Suntour/Browning Electronic Automatic Shifting Transmission or "BEAST?"

I never saw a BEAST in person... can anyone comment about installation/repair/riding impressions?

http://www2.bsn.de/Cycling/articles/browning.html
I bought an Ibis in 1988 in Santa Rosa, CA that came with a Browning AT. I was a little (lot) skeptical at first due to the added cost but figured I could always go to conventional. I rode my Ibis Mt. bike as my sole means of transportation from 1988 to 1994 and NEVER had a problem with it. In fact, I still wish I had one. (My roommate took my bike once without asking and broke it. I had at least 5,000 miles on the thing, he, 100 feet). The AT was phenomenal in my opinion. You could shift either way under full power, standing on a climb, whatever, and never worry about skipping or grinding a chain between rings. I still hope some day to get another. hell, I would pay top dollar for one right now.

I am always curious what others might have experienced as well.
 
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