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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to be getting a new mountain bike in a few weeks. I am quite interested in two aspects of the sport, possibly very divergent, riding in the woods over rough terrain and flat-land/urban obstacles.

Re: the urban/obstacle type riding, the trouble is, I am 39 years old and the only people I see doing this stuff are either really young or have been riding BMX bikes since the 70s.

So I am posting this in hopes that there are some favorite tutorials somewhere that a brand newbie can use to practice. And I am hoping that there are some basic ones too - like how to wheelie (e.g. what gear to be in, how to move your weight, what to do when it starts going over backwards etc.), how to stoppie, how to balance by hopping etc.

I have done a bunch of google searches and viewed probably a 100 google videos to date. But none really tell a newbie how to get started, other than finding some friends who know how to do the stuff already and learn from them (plus practice, practice, practice).
 

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Well, you pretty much summed it up in your last sentence.
Practice, practice, practice!
Riding with better riders is the best way to learn. You get to see exactly what line they chose, and they can give you great hints on how to pull stuff off. The best place to learn wheelies and stoppies is in your yard. Grass is ALOT more forgiving than pavement.

Wheelies: Use a gear that isnt too short. If you use too short of a gear (1st or 2nd) you will not have the torque to pull the front end back up if it starts to fall. If you think it is going over backward, a quick tap on your rear brake will pull the front end back down.
In truth, practice is the only way to improve your skills. Just get on your bike and try stuff. If you fall, learn from your mistake and try not to repeat it.

Hope this helps.
BTW, I'm 40 and I still ride Park, FR, DH, and aggressive XC. Age is mearly a state of mind. Though it does take a little longer to heal from injuries.
 

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you should get an all around bike like the giant stp and upgrade it like i am. it has pretty good components for a first bike, (its still my first bike) for it all you need to do is get a new fork and pedals and then you are set to shread up the streets. I got a 05 stp for way cheap. but i knida wish i had gotten the 06 cuz it looks wayyy sick. tutorials... Look in the beginners cornner theres a threan in there (should be one of the first) called bunnyhop tutorial video by flowmaster . i have to say its really good and i think he gives advice on wheelies 2

enjoy brah!

ps excuze my grammar im way hungover
 

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Check out the vids on the bottom of this page:

http://www.totalvid.com/browse.cfm?intSelectedIdnt=6690066

West Coast Style - Freeride Fundamentals
Fundamentals
West Coast Style - Mountain Biking

I've seen both "Fundamentals" and "WCS - Mountain Biking". If you want something that starts right from the beginning I would go w/ "WCS - Mountain Biking". It really breaks the move down into simple steps and is really clear. "Fundamentals" is a great watch but I think it be a stage 2 or 3 tutorial. "WCS - Freeride Fundamentals" seems to fall in between the other 2 but I still have to watch it.

As far as a bike, the STP foggy said would be a nice one to look at. Kona, Specialized, and other big brands are selling that type of DJ, street, park rides for great values.

I just have to ask, what do you mean by urban? More along trials (like Ryan Leech) or street like how BMX guys typically ride it? Or are you just looking to ride some areas going down stairs or jumping off loading docks and stuff? This could very well determine what sort of bike you want to get.
 

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Mastering Mountain Bike Skills

There is a really well written book by the above title, or something close to it, that gives step by step instructions on who to perform various "moves" on the bike. It is written with the input of Brian Lopes, who is arguably one of the best bike handlers on the planet. I hvae been riding for about 15 years and jsut picked it up last year. it was so well written and interesting that I read it cover to covre in aboiut two days. And I learned a ton from it. The trick is to start with one skill and practce, practice, practice. good luck and welcome to the fold.
 

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WCS freeride

Oh to be 39 again!I've found those vids at totalvid very helpful.After 10 or 12 years of mt.biking I feel like I'm starting all over again.It's alot of fun and a little scary.And wear your shin guards with those platforms!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
defconfour said:
As far as a bike, the STP foggy said would be a nice one to look at. Kona, Specialized, and other big brands are selling that type of DJ, street, park rides for great values.

I just have to ask, what do you mean by urban? More along trials (like Ryan Leech) or street like how BMX guys typically ride it? Or are you just looking to ride some areas going down stairs or jumping off loading docks and stuff? This could very well determine what sort of bike you want to get.
I guess what I mean by urban is riding in the skate park with my kids, doing some stairs (I think one way is called a manual), eventually going toward trials stuff where you navigate the bike through ridiculous places like over picnic tables, along brick walls etc. It sounds a little aggressive when I type it out, but I have always been in awe of guys riding mountain bikes very slow over interesting terrain. We have a bunch of log and rock garden type terrain that I'd like to tackle as well.

I did check out the STP, and honestly had not considered a hard-tail at all! I was focusing on dual-suspension bikes in the $1,500 range like the C-dale Prophet, Rush and Giant Trance 3. I spent all afternoon demoing bikes at the various local shops in the 90 degree heat and I was a total sweat ball!

Thanks for the advice so far. I better consider a hard-tail - it looks like you get much better components for the money and $1k gets a pretty decent bike.
 

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Ride with kids. I turned 48 today. The guys I ride with range from 15 to late 20's. And I learn from them every session.
Don't hit stuff that scares you, and let the bike do the work.
Start on easy stuff and you will build confidence quicker.
Good luck, and have fun.
Theres nothing like air !!
RTW.
 

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for the skate park if in not mistaken you should get a hardtail, and for my pops b-day we just got him a specialized stumpjumper the fs version, do you want to do downhill or more crosscountry type ( goin up and down hills more) because the stp is for what your talkin about with street and skateparks and such, if you can find a cheap hardtail to upgrade over time and get a nice fs bike for xc or downhill (which ever). But ht is pretty much a must for a skatepark
 
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