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C-Wheels
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll be starting my 4th year of Midwestern XC racing this year, and I'd like to move up into the Sport class. I'd like to get my bike prepared as best I can. I have a 2000 GT Zaskar X that I rode as a trail bike for years. When I got into racing I started upgrading many of the components and it's been great for racing so far, but I feel that I could get it in better shape compared to some of the newer bikes I've tested. The component level on the bike is pretty good now, and it's approx 24 lbs. My question is, is there work I can have done on the bike that would make it work more smoothly, outside of the general tune-ups I do each year? Some of the components are getting older, and I'm not sure if they should be cleaned/reconditioned, etc. Is there a process that a bike shop can do overall on the bike to get in in better shape, in addition to a standard tune-up?

Current set-up
2000 GT Zaskar X frame
Duke XC fork (just got a Fox F100 to install)
XT Cranks (2 years old) with mostly XTR/XT set-up
Easton XC One Wheels (one season old)
WTB Weirwolf tires (just ordered Wolverines for better rolling resistance)
Ritchey stem and carbon bar
Avid BB5 Mech disc brakes (probably 5 years old).

Thanks for any suggestions.
 

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mnoutain bkie rdier
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2,823 Posts
CRB1 said:
I'll be starting my 4th year of Midwestern XC racing this year, and I'd like to move up into the Sport class. I'd like to get my bike prepared as best I can. I have a 2000 GT Zaskar X that I rode as a trail bike for years. When I got into racing I started upgrading many of the components and it's been great for racing so far, but I feel that I could get it in better shape compared to some of the newer bikes I've tested. The component level on the bike is pretty good now, and it's approx 24 lbs. My question is, is there work I can have done on the bike that would make it work more smoothly, outside of the general tune-ups I do each year? Some of the components are getting older, and I'm not sure if they should be cleaned/reconditioned, etc. Is there a process that a bike shop can do overall on the bike to get in in better shape, in addition to a standard tune-up?

Current set-up
2000 GT Zaskar X frame
Duke XC fork (just got a Fox F100 to install)
XT Cranks (2 years old) with mostly XTR/XT set-up
Easton XC One Wheels (one season old)
WTB Weirwolf tires (just ordered Wolverines for better rolling resistance)
Ritchey stem and carbon bar
Avid BB5 Mech disc brakes (probably 5 years old).

Thanks for any suggestions.
Sounds like a good set up. You could always swap the frame out for something lighter I guess? Pedals? Oh..and make sure you try tubeless (Stan's perhaps) if you are not doing so already. That will make a HUGE improvement on how that hardtail handles and feels.
 

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C-Wheels
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks rydbyk. The Zaskar has always felt great, and it's a decent weight at less than 4 lbs, so I think if I upgrade my next bike will probably be something different like a complete 29er. If I do that, it won't be for another couple years.

I would like to know more about the ride feel and handling differences of going tubeless. I know the obvious benefit of not having tubes to puncture, but what else can you tell me about how the tubeless would affect the hard tail ride quality? Thanks.
 

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mnoutain bkie rdier
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CRB1 said:
Thanks rydbyk. The Zaskar has always felt great, and it's a decent weight at less than 4 lbs, so I think if I upgrade my next bike will probably be something different like a complete 29er. If I do that, it won't be for another couple years.

I would like to know more about the ride feel and handling differences of going tubeless. I know the obvious benefit of not having tubes to puncture, but what else can you tell me about how the tubeless would affect the hard tail ride quality? Thanks.
You are on a fairly unforgiving 26" aluminum hardtail. By going tubeless (see Stan's NoTubes on the internet), you can run a very low psi which provides better traction by increasing the tire footprint. Equally nice, you will get a plusher ride that does not beat you up. Remember, running a lower psi actually lowers rolling resistance a bit, contrary to what we all used to think... Instead of bouncing all over the place from pebble to pebble, your tire will now roll right over them.

If you go to Stan's website, it will tell you what to do and you can call to see if your current wheelset will work. Most likely it will.
 

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C-Wheels
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, xgjokax. I love the 2000 Zaskar frame. You know when a bike just feels great. It climbs really well. What are you riding?
 

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I agree with the "going tubeless" suggestion. I converted my 2007 hardtail stumpjumper a few months back, and it's been one of the best upgrades I've invested in. To me, the wheel set feels quicker and more nimble. I've lowered the psi as mentioned, which does help with traction while making it a smoother ride for a hardtail. Def look into it.
 

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I would suggest upgrading your brakes to some decent hydraulic ones. Avid Elixr's are good and reasonable in price. They may not make your bike faster, but you will increase your confidence and control which will allow you to carry more speed down hill and into corners.

My experience with BB5's was that I had to break early and often to maintain control.
 

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rydbyk said:
Remember, running a lower psi actually lowers rolling resistance a bit, contrary to what we all used to think....
rydbyk, can you elaborate on this a bit? I've always thought the opposite was true; higher pressures=less rolling resistance.
 

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With lower tire pressures the tire "rolls over" obstacles rather than getting bounced around. Traction improves and if you are riding a hard tail noticeably easier on the body as well.

I used to run tubed tires in the mid 30's and get a couple flats a year while racing. Switched last year to tubeless (Stans) and usually have around 26 pounds. The old bike rides so much better and I haven't had a flat in over a year. I've totally converted to tubeless and can't imagine ever going back to tubes. It was much easier to convert than what I was lead to believe.
 

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mnoutain bkie rdier
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bagz007 said:
rydbyk, can you elaborate on this a bit? I've always thought the opposite was true; higher pressures=less rolling resistance.
search the forums a bit. there are endless threads and articles about it now. sometimes there are fads and sometimes there are things that come along and just stick. tubeless is here to stay.
 
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