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Dirtmistress
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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone own one of these little gizmos? I'm thinking of getting one but can't find any reviews on it. Is it worth it or is it a hassle? Do you download areas you ride and then follow that on the screen. I like to climb and would like the altimeter. Any info. would be most welcome.
Happy presents day to all!
 

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govt kontrakt projkt mgr
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I want the edge 305 myself--last I checked the Garmin website it said available Jan 06.

If it's anything like the vetta 100 when it was to come out we are in for a long wait--it took almost a year to work the bugs out of the vetta after they advertised it and finally released it.

Hope this thing is really ready to go to market--and yeah-- I too would be interested in seeing some comprehensive reviews be4 deciding to purchase.
 

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Slowest Rider
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Only know what I read about Edge

I was thinking of upgrading to the Edge and only know what I read on Garmin's web site, as the Edge is not out yet. But I have lots of GPS units and can see some tradeoffs versus other of Garmin's line.

I would say the Edge is indeed a nice new bike-specific GPS. But I'd say it's more oriented for road bike and fitness training than MTB riding. For MTB I'd suggest the eTrex Vista Cx (I currently have the older B&W Vista) or slightly larger GPSMAP 60CSx, which is probably my next upgrade rather than the Edge. The small "x" at the end means, that like the Edge, it has the high sensitivity SiRFstarIII™ receiver for much less drop outs in foilage and canyons. The Edge and all the "x" branded models with this advanced receiver are coming out in January. Wait until then in any case.

If you're set on the Edge, for more accurate altimeter, you may may want to consider the barometric altimeter of the Edge 305 that's 2-3 times more accurate (depending on weather and air pressure changes) and has resolution to one or two feet rather than 100 feet. You also get one of Cadence or Heart Rate Monitor.

[EDIT: Found the Edge 205/305 manual on Garmin's web site. The maps indeed look non-existent or very crude at best with no downloads possible it seems. There is a "compass" page to find your next way point. Downloading multiple routes is possible, but they don't say how many. The "History" can store the track for as long as you don't run out of 13,000 way points (maybe 10-20 long rides) and review all data from that ride weeks later, versus the ability to reduce and store different rides seperately as on the eTrex.]


Why the Edge is a good road bike GPS:
  • Small size - nice small bike oriented display
  • Odometer
  • High Sensitivity GPS may be able to replace bike computer (just don't go under thick foilage or narrow canyons)
  • Map Screen for Navigation (but download memory size is not listed, if any, so detailed street or topo maps may not be provided. Manual only shows your tracks on a very crude map. )
  • Multiple routes can be stored (doesn't say how many in manual)
  • A compass screen can show you the direction and distance to your next waypoint. (same as on eTrex but cruder)
  • Can store tracks of your ride - one track only (versus 10 tracks on Vista)
  • Light weight: 88 grams versus 150 grams for eTrex Vista
Why the Edge is a good training GPS:
  • Optional cadence
  • Optional heart rate monitor
  • Abilty to plot both of above along with ride profile using "Motion Based" software on your computer
  • You can race other "Virtual Partner". I'd use this to race myself on previous rides - "Depicts digital cyclist (desired speed) in relation to your real-time speed and shows how far ahead or behind you are."
    [*]Lap times recorded
    [*]Timer Pause (eTrex GPS can also list "moving" and "stopped" time separately, without need for a button)

Why the Edge is maybe not the best for MTB:
  • Smaller screen than eTrex line, only B&W versus the very nice nice sunlight-readable color screens now available.
  • Navigation: Only stores 100 waypoints (versus 1000 on eTrex lines) You'll be need to change them each time you go to a different park to ride. I tend to have 20 (SDF) to 110 (Henry Coe) waypoints per park, depending on the size. With 1000 waypoints, I keep them all on my GPS without swapping.
  • Routes: For navigation in remote areas without good signs, you want to spell out a route between many waypoints at trail junctions. [Edit: the Edge manual says storing "multiple" (how many??) routes are possible.] Note the eTrex Vista can store 20 routes - all your favorites and options if you change your mind.
  • Maps: Memory is oddly not listed on any spec sheet. So it may have only fixed crude street maps without downloadable maps. [Edit: the manual show a map screen with only your waypoint and tracks shown. They say something about it being better to define these on a computer first, which all indicates no maps on the GPS. For MTB, you'd prefer a topo map that can be downloaded ($80 Garmin option though). For finding the trail head in your car and finding the after-bike food place and gas station, you want the detailed road maps and Points of Interest (another $80 option).
  • With downloadable street maps, you get Points of Interest that show you where the closest ATM, bike shop, burrito, gas, motel, etc. can be found, with phone numbers, address, and directions. A very BIG feature.
  • Tracks: You can only store one track. Hope you download it before your next ride overwrites it. The eTrex Vista can store 10 tracks.
  • Limited Battery Life: Garmin says up to 12 hours which means 6-8 hours, including rest stops. The eTrex and other lines last longer, and allow you to exchange rechargable AAs. But the Edge Li battery will just go dead on you on any epic ride.
  • Unproven reliabilty: My eTrex Vista has gone two years on my handlebars with many endos and frame breaks and many high speed bone rattling rock gardens and hasn't missed a beat
 

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I use the Rhino 120, I ride alone alot , and like the added benifit of maybe someone monitoring the airwaves if i have a yard sale. I have it on a handlebar mount, and have plotted some great rides at the local riding hole,, i also have flipped it to ride leaders that may be faster than me but do not know the trails,, and I ride sweep. We used it on the White Rim to stay in touch with the sag rigs as well so a multi purpose rig,,
 

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Dirtmistress
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535 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
BigLarry said:
I was thinking of upgrading to the Edge and only know what I read on Garmin's web site, as the Edge is not out yet. But I have lots of GPS units and can see some tradeoffs versus other of Garmin's line.

I would say the Edge is indeed a nice new bike-specific GPS. But I'd say it's more oriented for road bike and fitness training than MTB riding. For MTB I'd suggest the eTrex Vista Cx (I currently have the older B&W Vista) or slightly larger GPSMAP 60CSx, which is probably my next upgrade rather than the Edge. The small "x" at the end means, that like the Edge, it has the high sensitivity SiRFstarIII™ receiver for much less drop outs in foilage and canyons. The Edge and all the "x" branded models with this advanced receiver are coming out in January. Wait until then in any case.

If you're set on the Edge, for more accurate altimeter, you may may want to consider the barometric altimeter of the Edge 305 that's 2-3 times more accurate (depending on weather and air pressure changes) and has resolution to one or two feet rather than 100 feet. You also get one of Cadence or Heart Rate Monitor.

[EDIT: Found the Edge 205/305 manual on Garmin's web site. The maps indeed look non-existent or very crude at best with no downloads possible it seems. There is a "compass" page to find your next way point. Downloading multiple routes is possible, but they don't say how many. The "History" can store the track for as long as you don't run out of 13,000 way points (maybe 10-20 long rides) and review all data from that ride weeks later, versus the ability to reduce and store different rides seperately as on the eTrex.]


Why the Edge is a good road bike GPS:
  • Small size - nice small bike oriented display
  • Odometer
  • High Sensitivity GPS may be able to replace bike computer (just don't go under thick foilage or narrow canyons)
  • Map Screen for Navigation (but download memory size is not listed, if any, so detailed street or topo maps may not be provided. Manual only shows your tracks on a very crude map. )
  • Multiple routes can be stored (doesn't say how many in manual)
  • A compass screen can show you the direction and distance to your next waypoint. (same as on eTrex but cruder)
  • Can store tracks of your ride - one track only (versus 10 tracks on Vista)
  • Light weight: 88 grams versus 150 grams for eTrex Vista
Why the Edge is a good training GPS:
  • Optional cadence
  • Optional heart rate monitor
  • Abilty to plot both of above along with ride profile using "Motion Based" software on your computer
  • You can race other "Virtual Partner". I'd use this to race myself on previous rides - "Depicts digital cyclist (desired speed) in relation to your real-time speed and shows how far ahead or behind you are."
    [*]Lap times recorded
    [*]Timer Pause (eTrex GPS can also list "moving" and "stopped" time separately, without need for a button)

Why the Edge is maybe not the best for MTB:
  • Smaller screen than eTrex line, only B&W versus the very nice nice sunlight-readable color screens now available.
  • Navigation: Only stores 100 waypoints (versus 1000 on eTrex lines) You'll be need to change them each time you go to a different park to ride. I tend to have 20 (SDF) to 110 (Henry Coe) waypoints per park, depending on the size. With 1000 waypoints, I keep them all on my GPS without swapping.
  • Routes: For navigation in remote areas without good signs, you want to spell out a route between many waypoints at trail junctions. [Edit: the Edge manual says storing "multiple" (how many??) routes are possible.] Note the eTrex Vista can store 20 routes - all your favorites and options if you change your mind.
  • Maps: Memory is oddly not listed on any spec sheet. So it may have only fixed crude street maps without downloadable maps. [Edit: the manual show a map screen with only your waypoint and tracks shown. They say something about it being better to define these on a computer first, which all indicates no maps on the GPS. For MTB, you'd prefer a topo map that can be downloaded ($80 Garmin option though). For finding the trail head in your car and finding the after-bike food place and gas station, you want the detailed road maps and Points of Interest (another $80 option).
  • With downloadable street maps, you get Points of Interest that show you where the closest ATM, bike shop, burrito, gas, motel, etc. can be found, with phone numbers, address, and directions. A very BIG feature.
  • Tracks: You can only store one track. Hope you download it before your next ride overwrites it. The eTrex Vista can store 10 tracks.
  • Limited Battery Life: Garmin says up to 12 hours which means 6-8 hours, including rest stops. The eTrex and other lines last longer, and allow you to exchange rechargable AAs. But the Edge Li battery will just go dead on you on any epic ride.
  • Unproven reliabilty: My eTrex Vista has gone two years on my handlebars with many endos and frame breaks and many high speed bone rattling rock gardens and hasn't missed a beat
Thanks for the information. I think I'll pass and stick to my Ciclosport altimeter. It seems pretty good and if I get lost, I'll call a cab!
 

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I just finished installing the Edge 305 on my Spez FSR about an hour ago. What a neat little unit and all of my fears accumulated from prior GPS ownership (eTrex Vista, etc.) are gone. This little baby's SiRFstarIII™ receiver turns on and locks on satellites so fast I couldn't believe it - way less than a minute - cold. And, I was in my heated garage under the roof with the door closed. SLOW satellite scanning was one aspect I HATED with the non SiRFstarIII™ units of days gone by.

I'm going to start riding with it tomorrow. I have the heart rate monitor and cadence sender with it.

I'll let you all know how it works out for me.

Adios for now.

X
 

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13,000 track points enough?

I plan to replace my HAC4 with the Garmin Edge 305.

I would like to store the track logs of my favorite rides on my website, the Edge offers 13,000 track points. Is this enough? Has anyone used this device already in very rough terrain, rain, mud? Any feedback is welcome.
 

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Slowest Rider
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Track Points Used

You can adjust how often track points are saved. I find the default Automatic settings are just right. (Automatic only takes a point after so much movement, more on turns, ...)

On my eTrex Vista, with 10,000 track points on the "Active" log, I typically use up about 500 to 1000 points per hour (a point every few seconds), depending on the ride.

When I save a track on my eTrex Vista, it reduces the number of points in named 'Saved" track log to under 750 total. Even for a long ride, the data reduction is very good. When I plot the two out on a computer screen they're almost indistiquishable for all practical purposes. The only downside of a Saved track is that it doesn't save the time and speed info. But it does save the altitude, so you can still plot profiles from the Saved data.

The Edge doesn't say anything about "Saved" logs in the specifications or the manual, so I think it's like my Garmin "Quest" in which you need to save all the points. The small downside is that you need need to download your tracks after every 13 hours or so of riding. - not too bad except for multiday trips. (BTW, I can store 10 data reduced "Saved" tracks with names of my choosing in the eTrex Vista.)

The Edge just came out, so nobody will have much experience. But I used the eTrex Vista on the handlebars for years, with very big G forces through thick mud, nasty rain, big rock gardens, lots of technical singletrack with drops, and fast DH runs. It's lasted almost three years now - more than I can say for my other bike components. Just for starters, I've broken two bike frames in the same time... :( The eTrex has a thick case and rubberized edges. I've dropped down piles of rocks with only a big scratch across the face. I scuffed up and detatched the rubber edge a little when I drove out of a parking lot with the GPS left on top of the car and it bounced down the highway (did this two more times too over the years....:eek: Getting better now). It also had a problem with turning off on big hits, maybe once every week or two while riding. But I powered back on and it was working fine. It was likely the battery spring wearing out over the years, because if I bent it back, it got better for a few rides. The joystick was also wearing out with age and sometimes getting finicky, but usable. Again, these are more likely normal wear issues from my long repeated use over 2.5 years. I repaired all the cosmetic problems and self-turn-off a few months ago with Garmin's nice $125 like-new refurbish deal.

The Edge should be pretty good on reliabilty, like my eTrex, even if it's smaller. Garmin builds very tough units. They rate their units for constant 8 Gs of vibration, and several feet of water depth. Garmin knows this unit is going to be used on the handlebars of bikes and don't want returns, and design for such use. If you could only get other bike components that tough...
 

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The Silent Rider
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ArmySlowRdr said:
I want the edge 305 myself--last I checked the Garmin website it said available Jan 06.

If it's anything like the vetta 100 when it was to come out we are in for a long wait--it took almost a year to work the bugs out of the vetta after they advertised it and finally released it.

Hope this thing is really ready to go to market--and yeah-- I too would be interested in seeing some comprehensive reviews be4 deciding to purchase.
Just got my Edge 305 yesterday.......took it out to play for a little bit on my road bike today. Real easy to use and set up. I have the heart rate and cadence monitor with it. All in all with shipping it put me back 450.
 

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Forerunner 305

im also interested in getting a gps toy. i have looked at the forerunner 305 as i also like to run. this way i have the option of using it for rides and runs. is there a sig. difference in features between the forerunner 305 and the edge 305 in regards to the bike features. thanks in advance for any info.
 

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Also can anyone answer this question for me please?

When the Edge plots your progress, does it create waypoints itself, or is it only possible to import waypoints into the GPD from programs such as memory map etc?

What happens when you import your progress or track into a map program, does it have waypoints too?

I hope you can help as its my first GPS and the manual doesn't really say much...
 

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Transition J,
It seems your questions will be best answered by Garmin technical support.

Please post any information you might get from Garmin, I too would find it very useful to “overlay” a track on Google Earth.

Clarify one thing; What do you mean when you say “can’t see the route, only the marks”?

If the marks you refer to are like “bread crumbs” then you would have your route. As you can tell I’m a little confused by that statement.
 

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Slowest Rider
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GPS make automatic Tracks, not Waypoints

Transition J said:
Also can anyone answer this question for me please?

When the Edge plots your progress, does it create waypoints itself, or is it only possible to import waypoints into the GPD from programs such as memory map etc?

What happens when you import your progress or track into a map program, does it have waypoints too?

I hope you can help as its my first GPS and the manual doesn't really say much...
You're confusing Track Points with WayPoints.

Waypoints are a reduced set of locations with names that you make yourself for the purpose of making a Route that's a list of those Waypoints to help you navigate between those Waypoints. A typical Route may have 10-30 Waypoints, depending on the ride. Examples of Waypoint names: Home, Trailhead, NewTrail, TrailBranch, ....

Tracks Points are much more frequent recordings of the Track you made, up to 1000/hour, so you can plot your actual path later on top of many othe programs.

You can make and name a Waypoint from any GPS while riding by manually hitting a button and giving it a name. This is good if you come across a new trail crossing or want to mark more accurately to correct a current waypoint later on the computer.

Waypoints and Tracks are transferred separately between programs and GPS units. Waypoints can be transferred easily between most all programs and GPS units. Great freeware programs like G7toWin help if needed. Track points are not quite as universal, but you can probably upload from your GPS to most all programs. Just going between programs is more difficult with Tracks.

Maps are least compatible. You need the suppliers (like Garmin for Garmin GPS) maps and a GPS that accepts downloaded maps. I don't think the Edge accepts maps from what I read in the manual, which is a real big negative in this unit. (I don't think the small wrist held Foretrex does maps either.) But all these units do Waypoints and Tracks for navigating and recording your path.

A great book to explain the different new freeware programs and difference between other programs, and how to work data between all of them is Rich Owiings "GPS Mapping: Make your own Maps". He's a mountain biker and logs on here as RedwoodsMTBiker or something like that.
 

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Larry

Thanks for your help in assisting a complete newbie as far as these things are concerned! Much appreciated! :D
 

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Surfin' da mountain
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Garmin Forerunner vs. Edge

If the Edge is as good as the Forerunner, you'll be happy with it!

I have the Forerunner 301, but installed it on my stem on both my Road & Mountain Bike like shown in the Edge pic below. Its great to remove all the stuff, like cables targets and pick-ups, associated with bike computers. Lately I've been doing a lot of road riding at night and like to light up like a christmas tree so cars can see me. The Forerunner even works when the Light & Motion Arc HID is powered up minus the Heartrate signal. Touch a button and the Forerunner screen will light up for about 10 sec then extinguish.

The issue with the Forerunner is it sits parallel to the bars, not the stem. Durability hasn't been an issue whereas I've taken some spills on the MTB and the Garmin keeps on ticking. Rain and heavy tree cover last time in Pisgah haven't been an issue either. The Garmin Edge appears to the have all the goodies in the Forerunner and more. You may see my Forerunner on Ebay before long, in favor of the Edge.

Oh! one last point. The Altimeter is pretty cool too. Its accurate to within 50-75 feet. At sea level it fluctuates between +50 and -35. In the mountains I did a ride that I knew before the ride, dropped 2200 feet in elevation. The Garmin was off by about 75 feet at the top and 75 feet at the bottom, showing a full 2200ft change. The Altimeter fluctuates slightly due to barametric pressure.
 

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Capt Tripps said:
I use the Rhino 120, I ride alone alot , and like the added benifit of maybe someone monitoring the airwaves if i have a yard sale. I have it on a handlebar mount, and have plotted some great rides at the local riding hole,, i also have flipped it to ride leaders that may be faster than me but do not know the trails,, and I ride sweep. We used it on the White Rim to stay in touch with the sag rigs as well so a multi purpose rig,,
I use the same setup. Works great!!
 

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"Mr. Britannica"
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the forerunners have been updated
<img src="https://www.garmin.com/products/forerunner205/gallery/pt-frPair-LG.jpg">
can't really tell how small they although specs are listed on Garmin's page
 

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one issue i've come across...foretrex

i've had the garmin foretrex for about a year now...well actually i've had 2 of them as the first was replaced by garmin. my issue is that the receiver is highly sensitive to its orientation--it HAS to be facing upwards or the receiver just won't keep a signal, or that has been my experience. even then the first one i had got pretty lousy reception...i got tired of riding all day with some of you and at the end i had only gone 25 miles when everyone else had gone 27 on the same trail route!!

so garmin, being the great company they are, promptly replaced my original....since i've just gotten it i don't know if it's any better but hopefully i just had a bad one the first time around. the edge is supposed to have a better receiver from what garmin tech support tells me....
 
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