Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
x_y_of_z_posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
x_posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there, Been reading and wanted to ask more directly for some advice. Kinda on the low end of the Clydesdale class at 240 (normal walking around weight is 215ish working to get back there).

Have some disk issues (3 are 95% gone) and semi new to the MTB game (about 2 years) on an older hardtail. Want to stay with it love the local trails (upper Wisconsin roots, rocks, sand).

Looking to upgrade and not sure where to go, full squish, mid-fat or fat bike. Lots of pros for each category but wanted to see if anyone out there with somewhat similar issues and which route you went.

I have been looking to upgrade to a new bike and before back acted up again was looking mid-fat/fat (Stache,Roscoe, Farley), but have started to look at some full suspension.
 

·
Advanced Slacker
Joined
·
x_posts
This is like asking if you should get an electric car or a sedan.

Which tire size to get (standard vs plus vs fat) and and what kind of suspension (rigid, HT, FS) are two different questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
x_posts
If you can afford a good full suspension, go that way. Fat or plus is "less rigid", but still a rigid bike. I have been riding rigid bikes for 25 years and it is beginning to get to me the last couple years. I have to stretch or invert after rides to relive the pressure on a nerve now. I plan to get a full suspension when/if supplies get more to normal than they are now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
x_posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Apricate the feedback, i understand this was an open-ended question just wanted to see if there was anyone out there in same situation. What i was really eyeing is the Full Stache with is the full suspension and plus, but with it not being made anymore wasn't sure.

I am going to start looking the full suspension route, like i said just wanted to see if there was anyone out there who had some back issues but was ok with the plus or fat bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
x_posts
I don’t have as bad a back as you do; however, I have lower back issues and a lot of stiffness from my job. This often made after work rides unenjoyable and painful on my Hardtail. I just picked up a stumpjumper and it is excellent, everything I wanted and more. The rear suspension keeps things comfortable but still lets me feel connected to the trail. Also don’t count out a good bike fit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
x_posts
Stay the hell away from a hardtail.
i had a fuse 6fattie and had to switch to a stumpjumper 6fattie. (3.0" tires that they dont make anymore.)

The fuse hardtail was a disaster and the stumpjumper with a dvo shock is like floating on air.

its hard sometimes to trust but i will guarantee a fully will make your body happier.

Any full suspension bike with largest tires it can fit.
 

·
always licking the glass
Joined
·
x_posts
Stay the hell away from a hardtail.
i had a fuse 6fattie and had to switch to a stumpjumper 6fattie. (3.0" tires that they dont make anymore.)

The fuse hardtail was a disaster and the stumpjumper with a dvo shock is like floating on air.

its hard sometimes to trust but i will guarantee a fully will make your body happier.

Any full suspension bike with largest tires it can fit.
I have a plus tire setup 27.5x2.8 for winter and soft loose trails, but those low tire pressures on big balloon tires can be quite cushy. This bike is 140mm travel because i figure the bigger tires will be good this way.

My other bikes have progressively more travel with progressively more narrow tires. 170mm travel with 2.6 tires, and 200mm travel with 2.5 tires. I do what Fuse6F suggests: run the largest tires you can fit.

I tend to run my tires lower pressure than i used to, and that helps with the trail chatter. When you run larger tires, that makes a difference too.

Also you might want to run your suspension to make it as plush as possible. That will help too.

I love hardtails but at this point in my life I'd rather be overbiked to not take the jolting on my joints if i can avoid it. I have a bunch of previous injuries, and man, there are times my body reminds me of them and it sucks. I want it to suck less.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
x_posts
Well man, I got a plate in my neck from a fusion and L3/4-5/S1 are all pretty damn bad. I'm a bigger boy than you tho. But I tried a hardtail, a Kona Honzo, which is such a dope bike, but even with 140mm fork up front, it felt like my teeth were going to rattle out of my mouth. Back and neck did not like it at all either.

Also tried doing a gg ride with my buddy on my Surly Ogre. Forget it.

Go full squish. Your body will thank you in the long run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
x_posts
Hi there, Been reading and wanted to ask more directly for some advice. Kinda on the low end of the Clydesdale class at 240 (normal walking around weight is 215ish working to get back there).

Have some disk issues (3 are 95% gone) and semi new to the MTB game (about 2 years) on an older hardtail. Want to stay with it love the local trails (upper Wisconsin roots, rocks, sand).

Looking to upgrade and not sure where to go, full squish, mid-fat or fat bike. Lots of pros for each category but wanted to see if anyone out there with somewhat similar issues and which route you went.

I have been looking to upgrade to a new bike and before back acted up again was looking mid-fat/fat (Stache,Roscoe, Farley), but have started to look at some full suspension.
I'm 240lb's butt-nekid...

My most capable bike on technical terrain, is my Trek Full Stache 8.

It's 29x3.0 tires make bomb holes and trail chatter almost vanish!!

Plus, (excuse pun) the FS8 is a playful little minx as well.

It's one of the bikes (it and my AM HT 29er) that I'll keep in my stable until it croaks.

Such a rad bike... can handle technical Enduro races, bike packing or just rolling along on double track/fire roads.

If you can find one (discontinued) new/second hand, it'll make you grin from ear to ear.


Sent from my Asus Rog 3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
x_posts
I've had knee and wrist issues, so I can somewhat relate.

IMO Get a nice, plush full-suspension 29er from a bike brand that's known for that kind of thing. Santa Cruz and Ibis come to mind, but they're by no means the only ones who make 'magic carpet' ride bikes. Ones to avoid are, for example, Transition - they make 'firm, poppy' bikes that aim for a more aggressive style.

Fat tires do mute a tiny bit of chatter, but they don't do anything to stop a big hit from jarring your spine. So, if you blow it and slam your rear wheel into a rock or big root, your back will still get compressed. You need a suspension with a decent amount of travel to suck up those bumps. I'd say go at least 140mm there. It'll 'mute' the trails on the flat parts a bit, but it will protect your back in a big way.

From my own experience with 3.0 tires on a rigid bike, fatter tires are sensitive to pressure, and have a fine line between 'squishy', 'good pressure', and 'bouncy balloon' - it's far touchier than tires around 2.5 size. So, you'll get a better overall feel from a longer suspension and average tires than an average suspension and cushier tires.
 

·
Elitest thrill junkie
Joined
·
x_posts
Buddy has been riding around a recumbent while recovering from nerve damage and other issues. Recumbent has plus tires, but no suspension. In his words “it’s like riding a picnic table”.
 

·
CEO Product Failure
Joined
·
x_posts
6' 250lbs, with herniated C5-C7. I own a fat bike (Spec FatBoy) and a dualie (SC TB4-see my signature). While I LOVE the fatty, 90% of my trail rides are on the SC TB4. I did bump up to 2.6" tires and they are GREAT! Not sure if 2.6" is considered plus sized though.
 
  • Like
Reactions: schnee
x_y_of_z_posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top