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Team Sanchez
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I was gonna wait til Monday to do this, but I had some time to kill. Let me preface this review by stating that the fork has seen 10 days of riding, an oil change, and now 2 more days of riding. One thing to note on this fork if you are in the market for a Zoke, is that the oil level in the rebound leg was set too high from the factory, so for the first 10 rides, I was only using a max of 6 inches of travel.

When I first took this fork out on the trail, I noticed that it was going to take some time to break this puppy in, which I found unusual, as with Zokes of the past that I have owned, the forks felt great right from the get go. The first 5 rides or so felt harsh when riding down anything choppy, but the fact that the fork was so much stiffer than the Z-1 FR1 that it replaced left me grinning ear to ear. By the 6th ride or so, the fork started to come alive, and felt as buttery smooth as the Z-1 before it. This fork tracks better down the steep techy descents, and does not brake dive nearly as much as the 05 Z-1. Now some of the brake dive can be tuned out with a couple clicks of compression damping. My initial settings on the fork were 42 psi in the main chamber, with 5 clicks of compression.

The real test of this forks abilities came today out at little creek. When I changed the oil earlier this week, I went with 7.5 weight oil, just to get me thru the winter months. I will bump it up to 12 weight come summer time. I set both legs at 60mm from the top of the stanchions, which is what Zoke recommended as a max level. Today the idea was to see just how well the HS compression adjustement worked. I gotta say that the difference between full on, and full off is night and day. For DH, and long downhillls, I'd run this fork in the full off position, or no more than 5 clicks of compression. Any more than that, and the fork get noticeably stiffer. I took my pack off of multiple 5 footers to flat today to see what the different compression settings would do. My first couple of tries with no compression on, and the fork blew thru it's travel, and I really felt the bottom of the fork a couple of times. I added 10 clicks of compression, and the fork felt bottomless on the same drop. I was using all 170mm of travel, but no harsh bottom out. As for the ETA, it works as advertised, but will see little use on the trails I ride. In summary, so far this fork is the best thing I have ever ridden. My pack finally feels complete, to my wife's delight. This fork is not for everyone, but I'd say that if you are looking to build up one bike to do it all, then this is the fork that should adorn your steed. The A-C lengh is considerably shorter than last year's 66, so it still climbs well.
 

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El Chingon said:
I was gonna wait til Monday to do this, but I had some time to kill. Let me preface this review by stating that the fork has seen 10 days of riding, an oil change, and now 2 more days of riding. One thing to note on this fork if you are in the market for a Zoke, is that the oil level in the rebound leg was set too high from the factory, so for the first 10 rides, I was only using a max of 6 inches of travel.

When I first took this fork out on the trail, I noticed that it was going to take some time to break this puppy in, which I found unusual, as with Zokes of the past that I have owned, the forks felt great right from the get go. The first 5 rides or so felt harsh when riding down anything choppy, but the fact that the fork was so much stiffer than the Z-1 FR1 that it replaced left me grinning ear to ear. By the 6th ride or so, the fork started to come alive, and felt as buttery smooth as the Z-1 before it. This fork tracks better down the steep techy descents, and does not brake dive nearly as much as the 05 Z-1. Now some of the brake dive can be tuned out with a couple clicks of compression damping. My initial settings on the fork were 42 psi in the main chamber, with 5 clicks of compression.

The real test of this forks abilities came today out at little creek. When I changed the oil earlier this week, I went with 7.5 weight oil, just to get me thru the winter months. I will bump it up to 12 weight come summer time. I set both legs at 60mm from the top of the stanchions, which is what Zoke recommended as a max level. Today the idea was to see just how well the HS compression adjustement worked. I gotta say that the difference between full on, and full off is night and day. For DH, and long downhillls, I'd run this fork in the full off position, or no more than 5 clicks of compression. Any more than that, and the fork get noticeably stiffer. I took my pack off of multiple 5 footers to flat today to see what the different compression settings would do. My first couple of tries with no compression on, and the fork blew thru it's travel, and I really felt the bottom of the fork a couple of times. I added 10 clicks of compression, and the fork felt bottomless on the same drop. I was using all 170mm of travel, but no harsh bottom out. As for the ETA, it works as advertised, but will see little use on the trails I ride. In summary, so far this fork is the best thing I have ever ridden. My pack finally feels complete, to my wife's delight. This fork is not for everyone, but I'd say that if you are looking to build up one bike to do it all, then this is the fork that should adorn your steed. The A-C lengh is considerably shorter than last year's 66, so it still climbs well.
The compression on ALL of the 2006 66 forks is low speed, not high speed. Last year's 66 forks were high speed. This explains why it works well in reducing brake dive.

The RC2x has a high speed adjustment.

Just to clarify.

BTW, I like the 2006 66 forks. Very cool looking and ride like a dream. If I didn't care about too much weight and having 170mm I would buy one.
 

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SpawningGround said:
The compression on ALL of the 2006 66 forks is low speed, not high speed. Last year's 66 forks were high speed. This explains why it works well in reducing brake dive.

The RC2x has a high speed adjustment.

Just to clarify.

BTW, I like the 2006 66 forks. Very cool looking and ride like a dream. If I didn't care about too much weight and having 170mm I would buy one.
Not according to BTI, 06 forks with the new cartridge RC2x have both low and high speed adjusters

Marzocchi 66 RC2X 2006 Fork
RC2X 'MX bladder-type' cartridge design: externally adjustable rebound and high/low-speed compression damping and air 'preload' adjustability
1-1/8" aluminum (Alloy-FR) pre-pressed steerer tube with 35mm tapered alloy, black anodized stanchions
Updated (30mm shorter for improved geometry), 1 piece forged magnesium, Monolite-66 lower legs: disc brake only (74mm postmount)
Updated (10mm shorter for improved geometry), Cryofit M-design, boltless FR crown accepts Marzocchi integrated fender (2.7" tire OK): Made in Italy

Item No. Travel Spring type Damping Adjustability Brake mount Dropout Axle-crown Weight Color In Stock
MZ9514 170mm coil RC2X external rebound + high/low compression Disc only (PM-74mm) 20x110mm through-axle 555.2mm 5.95lb (2695g) flat black
MZ9515 170mm coil RC2X external rebound + high/low compression Disc only (PM-74mm) 20x110mm through-axle 555.2mm 5.95lb (2695g) white
 

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drumstix said:
Not according to BTI, 06 forks with the new cartridge RC2x have both low and high speed adjusters

Marzocchi 66 RC2X 2006 Fork
RC2X 'MX bladder-type' cartridge design: externally adjustable rebound and high/low-speed compression damping and air 'preload' adjustability
1-1/8" aluminum (Alloy-FR) pre-pressed steerer tube with 35mm tapered alloy, black anodized stanchions
Updated (30mm shorter for improved geometry), 1 piece forged magnesium, Monolite-66 lower legs: disc brake only (74mm postmount)
Updated (10mm shorter for improved geometry), Cryofit M-design, boltless FR crown accepts Marzocchi integrated fender (2.7" tire OK): Made in Italy

Item No. Travel Spring type Damping Adjustability Brake mount Dropout Axle-crown Weight Color In Stock
MZ9514 170mm coil RC2X external rebound + high/low compression Disc only (PM-74mm) 20x110mm through-axle 555.2mm 5.95lb (2695g) flat black
MZ9515 170mm coil RC2X external rebound + high/low compression Disc only (PM-74mm) 20x110mm through-axle 555.2mm 5.95lb (2695g) white
That's what I was saying dude. The RC2x gets the extra high speed adjust ALONG with with low speed.

Every one of them has low speed adjustment.
 

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Team Sanchez
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I understood what you were saying SG, and it makes more sense to me now. I guess you tune the bottom out threshold with the oil levels, just as with Zokes of the past, and now with added low speed compression. That explains why the compression adjustment on my fork affects the full stroke of the shock, and not just the last half.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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12 weight oil? And you think that it won't pack up or feel harsh during fast high speed hits? I usually take out the stock 7.5weight and put in about 5 weight. This makes it bouncy at low speed, but at high speed the fork is able to keep up and remain plush on fast repetative hits.
 

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Jayem said:
12 weight oil? And you think that it won't pack up or feel harsh during fast high speed hits? I usually take out the stock 7.5weight and put in about 5 weight. This makes it bouncy at low speed, but at high speed the fork is able to keep up and remain plush on fast repetative hits.
he also lives in mexico, right? Hot = less viscous

He's also a heavy rider and must be using higher spring rates, thus more damping might be needed for his mighty drops to flat.
 

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Team Sanchez
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I live in Southern Utah, but Mexico was a good guess... :rolleyes:

I run 15 weight oil in my 888, and used to run 12 wt. in my 05 Z-1. 5 weight is just too light for the type of riding I do. I have a 888 RC, and find that the top end compression damping is almost non existant, I the added viscosity helps on the bottom end, while still allowing the fork to remain super active on the small stuff. I guess the heavier oil just works better on heavier riders, not to mention that summer temps are always over 100 here.
 

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Outcast
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El C, I've read in other posts of yours that you found your 66 to be significantly stiffer than the Z1 you previously rode. Perhaps this is not a fair comparison, but how does the stiffness of the 66 compare to double crown forks you've owned and ridden? Thanks!
 

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Renegade said:
El C, I've read in other posts of yours that you found your 66 to be significantly stiffer than the Z1 you previously rode. Perhaps this is not a fair comparison, but how does the stiffness of the 66 compare to double crown forks you've owned and ridden? Thanks!
I've ridden the 66 rc2 forks. They are just as stiff if not slightly stiffer than any 32mm dual crown. I can tell there is much less play in the bushings on the 35mm stanchion forks than even the 32mm dualcrowns.

I've never noticed ANY flex in the 66 forks. Anything stiffer wouldn't be doing much more.
 

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Team Sanchez
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'd say that the 66 is easily as stiff as a 36 Talas I used to own, and equally as stiff as my 888. I know for sure that it is stiffer than my old 02 Shiver dual crown. When I get my Highline, I think that I will move this 66 over to it, and put an 06 Z-1 light on my Pack. Crash the Dog is running a Z-1 light on his pack, and the fork feels great, and the white on white is just so tasty.
 

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Just roll it......
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El Chingon said:
I'd say that the 66 is easily as stiff as a 36 Talas I used to own, and equally as stiff as my 888. I know for sure that it is stiffer than my old 02 Shiver dual crown.
I'll second that!! Granted, I've got the '05 66 with a steel steerer tube, but it is definitely stiffer than my 32mm Super T that I used to ride.

That's one reason why I kind of laugh when folks say there's no way a single crown can take the abuse that dual crowns can these days. Personally, I became sold on this fork a year+ ago when riding in Whistler for 1/2 a day with a pro rider. The dude was going HUGE (serious emphasis on big) on his RMX w/ a 66 and he told me he had ridden it everywhere all summer long except for "Rampage stuff".

My "singlecrown" fork has seen bigger stuff than my dual crown ever did.

EB
 
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