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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a used (6 months old) 2010 Fuel EX 8. I used the suspension setup guide provided on Trek's website along with the sag metes to set up my shocks and went riding. The first set of small hills and dips I hit I just about went over the bars because the front was way too soft and compressing too far. I adjusted it to my liking and when I was done, I had the settings for someone between 220-230lbs. Since I am about 195lbs. with my gear on, that seems like a huge difference to me. Has anyone else had a similar issue or should I look at checking out my air spring in the forks? The rear shock was a little soft as well but not near as bad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I adjusted the rebound according to Trek's chart. Didn't adjust the rebound outside of that except when I added more pressure.
 

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Mine ended up being a bit higher than recommended also. Use their charts as a reference but ultimately use actual sag measurements to set everything up.
 

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Double check to see if you aren't losing air when you remove the pump. If you fumble around while unscrewing it you could lose 5, 10, 15 psi. I noticed I did in the beginning until I got used to my pump. I also smeared a little clear silicone grease on the threads to make it screw - unscrew easily. Also, when you cycle the fork, push it down, does it compress easily? Do you have oil on the left stanchion (air side)? Maybe you have a blown seal in the air chamber, that will have be serviced. it's not about the damping as some above may have suggested, that only changes the rate of return after you hit a bump, this is about the air side of your shock. If the damping side is damaged then you'll just have a bouncing front suspension. Finally, maybe you suck and just don't know how to ride a suspension bike! Just KIDDING!!!! Geeze, calm down I was only joking around! Don't be so serious!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cutbert, maybe your right! Good points on the loosing psi. I thought about that and added an extra 5 psi on a couple of adjustments. I can get the ride I desire, its just a bit above the specs that Trek recommends and doesn't quite fall within the range of the sag meter. Was just trying to see if anyone else had a similar experience.
 

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That seems like an awful high pressure for your riding weight. I suspect some type of leak in the fork. With that much pressure in there it'd be tough to push down on that thing without some fairly considerable momentum. Just my two cents.
 

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btw, what fork is on the bike? Since you bought it used, I suppose I should ask if it's stock or something else than the Fox it should have come with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think there was some confusion about the pressure I am running in the fork. I am running about 95 to 100 psi which is what Trek recommends for a 220 to 230 lbs rider. I went to Fox's site and got the manual for the fork and they recommended pressures for the same fork at 95 psi for a 185-200 lbs rider. That falls just about right where I am at as far as my weight with gear and psi I am running. Not sure why two such different suggestions from two different companies. With the fork where I like it, sag falls just a hair above the 20% mark on the sag meter.

I also read somewhere that you should set sag on the fork for the EX by standing on the pedals insead of sitting. I have been on so many websites and posts I cannot find it again. I tried it and it worked out perfectly for me. By the way the original Fox 32mm F120 RL is still on the bike.
 

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ianblaster said:
I also read somewhere that you should set sag on the fork for the EX by standing on the pedals insead of sitting.
I also read that somewhere when I first got my bike, can't remember where either. I've recently been setting the sag while sitting for a more plush ride, personal preference though.

Your pressures are not that far off. IMO, set your sag by actual measurements and let it fly...
 

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you're right, I misunderstood. I agree that you should stand on the pedals and put some weight on the handlebars while setting the fork sag. This is how the Trek demo guys did it. I feel this method gets you a little closer than while sitting, but both usually require tweaking anyway.
 

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Ive always had trouble with my fox fork on my EX. I run 45psi to get the right sag and still cant get full travel - I weigh 152lb
 

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Cutbert said:
Finally, maybe you suck and just don't know how to ride a suspension bike! Just KIDDING!!!! Geeze, calm down I was only joking around! Don't be so serious!
Not to go off topic but in all fairness there may be some truth here. When I picked up my EX9 I thought I was hot ****, ripping up the trails just like I was on my old hardtail. I found that I liked having the pro-pedal on almost all of the time. I convinced myself that this was just the way liked riding my bike and that was fine. WRONG! it wasn't until I picked up Brian Lopes book "Mastering Mountain Bike Skills" and learned the differences of riding a FS/HT. You need to learn to throw your weight around a bit more with a FS bike and preload sooner for hopping logs, etc. After reading this book I found out there is much more to riding than just pedaling and fighting to keep the rubber side down.
 
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