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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am riding a 04' fuel 90 and I have no complaints. I have about 2500.00 to spend on a new bike and I was looking real hard at the stump jumper can I have everyones honest opinion? I would appreciate it. Or any other bike in that price range?
Thanks
 

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Oh how I would love to be in your position.

My own personal view regarding your question is that I was never impressed with the way the Trek Fuel looked and I was never a fan of their suspension design either. I'm not sure how much of a difference the Horst link design has over the Trek system, but as far as I have read, Specialized owns the patent on the design and just about every company out there that makes bikes have copied this design for full suspension bikes one way or the other.

I would also suggest riding them both and seeing how you like the ride. For that kind of money you obviously don't want to rely solely on other people's opinions, so try them out and see which one rides better. If they ride the same pick the one that makes you look the best. ;)

http://alamedabicycle.com/page.cfm?PageID=74

Here's some addition information I found over the net.
What's up with different suspension designs?

Rear suspension designs fall into two general categories - fully-active designs and semi-active designs. Fully-active designs are meant to work all the time - even when climbing - offering the most plush ride downhill and traction benefits uphill. Examples include the single-pivot design (Santa Cruz Superlight, Diamond Back), Specialized FSR, and the GT I-Drive. Semi-active rigs, based on pivot positions or mechanical additions, are meant to de-activate while climbing to minimize bobbing. Examples include the Giant NRS, Trek Fuel & Fisher Sugar, and Specialized Epic.

The Specialized FSR design is by far the most efficient fully-active design in the market today. The inherent flaw in fully-active designs is pedal feedback, resulting in the bicycle bobbing when climbing uphill. The FSR design transforms vertical bob to a more horizontal bob, delivering full traction benefits while virtually eliminating bob.

The Giant NRS design is arguably the least-flawed semi-active design. All semi-active designs are inherently flawed due to what they're trying to accomplish - a smooth, active ride downhill while locking out during climbs, without the use of lockout levers. For example, the Trek Fuel/Fisher Sugar design loses its suspension characteristics while braking - something you'll be doing a lot of while going downhill! The Giant NRS does lose some suspension when pedaling downhill, a small sacrifice for those who want an ultimate climbing machine at an affordable price.
 

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fuel90rider... I also just came off a 2005 Fuel 80, with no complaints on the bike. Just recently went to a new bike and the Stumpjumper was one prime candidate for me. Did the whole test ride thing (it rode really nice) but went with another prime candidate bike. I got the Yeti 575. Super bike and is my suggestion to you. If you want a excellent long travel trail bike (about in that price range) and can still climb as well as the Fuel, this may be the bike for you as well. Just thought I would throw my 2 cents out there. Good luck!
 

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Also the 2007 Fuels and Fuel Ex's have been redesigned and are getting great reviews so you might want to look at them. The 2007 EX's have more travel and are lighter. The EX would be more of the comparable model the the Stumpjumper FSR anyways. The Fuel is a more race oriented bike with less travel and quicker handling (more like the Specialized Epic which has thinner tires, 100mm of travel in the front, etc). The EX and Stumpjumper FSR are more all around type trail bikes. I personally have a 2006 EX8 and I rode the stumpjumper FSR before I bought it. I liked the feel of the EX8 better but that was just personal. Plus I got the EX8 for a much better price. I don't think you could go wrong with the FSR though - just ride it and make sure it fits you but it is going to be a different type bike then the Fuel that you are used to.
 
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