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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been on a 2014 Talon for a few years, find myself getting more and more adventurous and moving into gnarlier trails (Been working on the lingo too). I found a used IBIS Mojo from 2012, full XT build, no damage beyond rubs and slight scratches (under 1200). I pulled the trigger and got it. Very happy, but hve a few questions.
1. How do I set up the front and rear shocks?
2. As I ride more, how should they feel if they are set up corrctly?
3. More of a style thing, due to the FS, should I just let the bike fly? As in, trust the suspension (again, only been on a hard tail)

Thanks!!
 

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Google mountain bike suspension setup. There are tons of great YouTubes and articles out there. They'll also answer question 2.

3. Sort of. That's kinda the point of more suspension. More suspension travel means you can hit bigger stuff harder, within its limits.
 

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2 guides I like:

http://www.shockcraft.co.nz/media/wysiwyg/shockcraft_1_page_suspension_setup_guide_v0.pdf

https://www.bikerumor.com/2014/10/3...n-setup-series-full-series-pdf-free-download/

The first one takes the short/succinct form. The other takes the long form approach to explanation. The language between them is a little different. In the first, sag is treated as a side-effect of setting the spring rate. Whereas in the 2nd, sag is used as a way to gauge the spring rate.

The best way to describe well-set up suspension is that it just tends to disappear when you're riding. It means it's doing its job and you're not fighting it. If it's not set up well, you'll fight the suspension through any number of undesirable behaviors.

I think regardless of what bike you're on, you need to learn to trust it. But that becomes especially true when you've got a bike with gobs of suspension that can eat up chunky terrain at speed. And even if you don't have that much suspension travel, but the bike has a very stable geometry and/or seemingly endless traction, it can make up for a lot of rider shortcomings.

My new hardtail is a good example of this. I built it to be a very capable bike with a 140mm fork, but it's proving to be even better and more trustworthy than I expected. Being a hardtail, I have to focus a little more on line choice than with a comparable full suspension, but it's eating up the chunk as long as I trust it.
 
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