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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read the post about improving climbing. Somone mentioned the front lifting and that was bad, i know why now, but how do i fix it?

Today during my ride i noticed that my front wheel was very light when i climb. Im 5"8', on a 17.5 frame, hardtail. I think my stem might be too long, its a 150. ITs just frustrating on a loose rocky climb when the front wanders while your trying to keep force over the back to get traction.

Any tips to help me climb in the saddle with out my front wandering? I tryed shifting to the nose of the saddle, this wasnt very comfortable nor was I very confident about it. Keep trying that?


Thanks :)
 

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Kinda sounds like your ride might be a bit large. I'm just shy of 5'11" and have an 18" frame with some kinda shorter stem. Anyway try bending your elbows and lean forward. Try to spin too, don't pump you legs up and down. Pumping your legs will cause the back end to want to out run the front by going under and causing the front to go over and back. You want constant smooth power not surges. I hope that makes sense. Most of all of course is practice, practice. I suppose you could lean too far forward and lose traction from a lack of weight on the back wheel too. It's fine balance, but you'll get it with some practice and think about what you did when you fail to clear a climb.
 

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If sliding forward on the saddle improves your climbing (but you don't like the feeling of the saddle nose invading your privacy), moving the saddle forward can help the comfort a lot. I've changed to a straight seatpost (the two bolt kind) and move my saddle forward, and I don't need to slide forward except for the steepest climbs. Some folks think the saddle position should be "optimised" to leg length etc, but I think keeping the front wheel down on climbs is more important, unless you're a serous racer where efficency and power really matter. Just remember if you move the saddle forward you should raise it a bit too.

Depending on how long/short your torso is, 17.5 might be a decent frame size (but you didn't say what the TT length is), so you should probably try a stem closer to 100mm if you can (easy swap with threadless anyway). Your LBS should be happy to let you try one or two sizes out before buying.
 

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You know, it's interesting that by the rule that says your knee should be over the pedal spindle when the crankarms are horizontal your seat is too far back on most mountain bikes. I have mine all the way forward on the rails and could still move forward a few more mm. Some people agree with KOPS, some don't, but for me it's always been the right position. You might want to check and see where you're at, like fsrxc says, moving it forward may solve your problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the tips,

I am going to try to move my saddle forward.

I use clipless. Ive been riding for a few years, and never really thought much about it when it happened but the post made me step back and think why i have trouble sometimes on climbs.

Thanks agin, if you can think of anymore please let me know. I ordered ned overnds book too, hopefully that will help
 

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What are your hands doing?

You might check to be sure that your hands are pulling down and back on the grips, in the general direction of where the back tire contacts the ground. Don't pull up.

Also, the absolute biggest point, as other posters said, is to be sure you are bending your upper body down toward the top tube. Your elbows will be bent.

BTW, if you stand on a climb, keep the same bent position... don't straighten your back up.
 

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elistan said:
Thanks for the tips,

I am going to try to move my saddle forward.

I use clipless. Ive been riding for a few years, and never really thought much about it when it happened but the post made me step back and think why i have trouble sometimes on climbs.

Thanks agin, if you can think of anymore please let me know. I ordered ned overnds book too, hopefully that will help
Don't forget to bend forward more during the climb--A couple of folks already mentioned it.
 
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