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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Obviously, I must of forgotten to put in enough grease. i can't get my pedal out. The pedal doesn't have an axel that allows a spanner to be used, it's a #6 allen key/hex wrench only and I've rounded off several already, even with a long metal pipe on the allen key/hex wrench for extra leverage. I've tried soaking in WD40 for a week with no luck. I am tying to undo in the right direction.

I was wondering about putting the crank in my freezer to see if the alu crank would contract a but to help loosen it from the axel. I would think heating it would cause the alu to expand, making the seal even tighter.

Any other ideas before I take a dremel to destroy the crank!

i am never going to buy another pedal that doesn't have wrench slot on the axel!:madman:

Rob
 

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English Bob said:
Hi,

Obviously, I must of forgotten to put in enough grease. i can't get my pedal out. The pedal doesn't have an axel that allows a spanner to be used, it's a #6 allen key/hex wrench only and I've rounded off several already, even with a long metal pipe on the allen key/hex wrench for extra leverage. I've tried soaking in WD40 for a week with no luck. I am tying to undo in the right direction.

I was wondering about putting the crank in my freezer to see if the alu crank would contract a but to help loosen it from the axel. I would think heating it would cause the alu to expand, making the seal even tighter.

Any other ideas before I take a dremel to destroy the crank!

i am never going to buy another pedal that doesn't have wrench slot on the axel!
Is the pedal toast? Are you rounding off hex keys or the hex socket in the pedal?
If you're rounding keys, then you may be using the wrong size key or keys made of cheap material. Try getting a good quality hardened hex key.

Try the freezer. Can't hurt.

If you have to destroy something, which is more expensive, the pedals or crank?
 

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I think you have it backwards, you need to expand the crank to make it loose on the pedal thread. Think of it this way if you cut a ring and lay it out flat and heat it up it will expand along its length, get longer. Now roll it back into a ring, the ring is larger and the hole in the middle is also larger. Try heating the crank. If it is possible to get the pedal assembly off the shank of the pedal you might be able to put a pipe wrench on part of the shank that is not part of the bearings area. That would get it off. I would rather drill out the pedal shank then cut the crankset, the pedal is cheaper. Also when you put it back together use a thread lube such as Never-sieze rather then grease. Grease is for moving parts ie. bearings. Thread lube is for???? you guessed it, threads. It does what it supposed to do.
 

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hugh088 said:
I think you have it backwards, you need to expand the crank to make it loose on the pedal thread. Try heating the crank.
Doh! Yea you're right. For some reason I thought he said the pedal was alum.
Alum. heats and expands faster than steel. So heating the crank will help loosen it from the steel pedal axle. It would also help to wrap some ice cold rags around the pedal, and put foil around the rags, while heating the crank.

I would rather drill out the pedal shank then cut the crankset, the pedal is cheaper.
Not necessarily true. Time Atac XS Pedals $100 Time Atac XS Titan Carbon Pedals $274
 

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The threads have oxidized making an interference fit. Using WD40 or something similar in addition to heating and cooling cycles will allow the lubricant to penetrate and do it's work. Sharp blows to the wrench work better than steady force but that's hard to do in a bike stand. Rounding the wrench off is a bad sign, it might be too late if the hex socket is damaged.
 

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Ammonia

Try using some household ammonia to break the metal bond. I have had much better luck using ammonia to break free aluminum seat posts in steel frames than heat or penetrating oil.

You might also try getting a 6mm hex head bit and putting it in a long handled ratchet.

Good luck!
 

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Machinist's Wax

Heating it is the way to go and if you have access to machinist's wax or break free put that on the backside where the thread access is once its hot, let it work it's way into the threads then heat it some more. Once the wax is in the threads, heating it again will turn it to steam and usually break up any corrosion between the dissimilar metals. Oil works too but be careful what you heat it with so it doesn't catch fire.

Curious- are the pedals worth more than the crankset? You mentioned cutting the cranks. Why not take the pedal apart if you can, put a vise grip on the spindle, and take it out that way? If the pedals are cheaper than the cranks that is...
 

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Depends if you are wanting to keep parts. But I assume the pedals are toast and the crank is still in good shape?

I'd pull the crank off. Put it in a vise with the hex of the pedal exposed to the top. use a rag or some sort special vice grip jaw pad to prevent marring of the cranks. Put a peice of wood underneth the cranks to brace it a bit.

Get an Impact driver with correct size hex. If the hex of hte pedals are pooched find a hex bit just slighltly bigger in side and file it down to fit whatever managled hex hole u have left. Tap it in with a hammer. Heat the crank slowly and evenly around where the pedal threads on to. Get real penetraiting oil, not WD40. WD40 is weak. Goto an automotive parts store and ask for penetrating oil. Even liquid wrench is better than WD40. I use Toyota fluids primarily in my garage.

Heat the crank. Spray oil. Hit it with an impact driver. Should pop no problem.

I've been restoring and fixing old sports cars for a very long time. If that doesn't work. Then you only option is the to dill out the pedals on a drill press. Collapse the rest of the crank's spindle onto itself with a cold chisel. But at that point most likely the threads on the crank will not be in good shape. A lot of work for pedals and cranks. Not like it's a 30 year old porsche part that you can not buy anymore. I'd just buy new cranks and pedals for the amount of effort of chasing new threads and drill it out.
 

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Hmmm Propane Torch with Time ATAC's

This might be a bit too much heat. My Time's have a rubber bushing to keep out dust, I presume. You have to be pretty careful with a propane torch because metal loves to transfer heat around and it will go from the point of application to your pedal in no time. I guess if you go at it slowly (heat gently, try, heat a bit less gently, try, etc) it might work without damaging anything.
 

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if you are careful you can make it work. I've refurbed a lot of very old rusty car parts by using by heating rust bolts.

If you are concerend about your pedals, get a wet rag and wrap the pedal. The moist/wet rag will give you a bit more margin before you being melting plastics.

For me usually rust bolts on 25 year old porsches = bad rubber already so the rubber melting wasn't a concern for me.

Just be careful on where and how long you apply your heat. The wet rag is not a magical barrier from the torch
 

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Wouldn't happen to be the non-drive side, would it?
 

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tlg said:
If you're rounding keys, then you may be using the wrong size
I have no idea what size a "#6 allen key/hex wrench" is but the pedal is made for a metric wrench (cannot remember which size).

You are turning the wrench in the correct direction?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
the pedal axel does not accept a size 15 metric wrench or spanner. You can only loosen/tighten it by putting a six sided key size #6 in the hole in the axel. And yes, I do know which way to turn it.

I plan to heat the axel in boiling water for 20 minutes and then put it in a vice and then drip anti-corrosion fluid in.

Unfortunatly I've been too busy with work and my youngest daughters second birthday to devote much time to it, and as the pedal and axel are both usable, though bonded together, there is no hurry.

I have bought a big jar of anti-seize in anticipation of successfully freeing the pedal.

Many thanks for all suggetions received.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
icegeek said:
Wouldn't happen to be the non-drive side, would it?
Yes it is, as a matter of fact, any reason you ask?
I'm tying to turn the allen key clockwise toward the back wheel if you were standing to the left of the bike.
 

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you could also try putting a 6mm alllen in a vise. then using leverage of the whole crank arm to help you get it off. Also another tip for stuck pedals i like is using a breaker bar and slowly but firmly jolt on breaker bar.I've found that leverage is your friend.
 

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English Bob said:
the pedal axel does not accept a size 15 metric wrench or spanner
I know.
Just went to check that my Time ATAC XS need a 6mm hex wrench. Just wasn't sure that #6 is the same thing.
 
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