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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
not sure if this is working (first time posting pics)

shock-stay from my 2001 truth

front triangle and rocker from 2004 waranty replacement

chain-stay from 2006 waranty replacement

its all good....

(thanks for the assist chad)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
help

trying to post pictures of my ride. when i hit the upload button i get 'page unavailable' . are the pics too big? any help would be great
 

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Unchained Freewheel
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PCfatty said:
trying to post pictures of my ride. when i hit the upload button i get 'page unavailable' . are the pics too big? any help would be great
email me the pics if you like..... check your pm
 

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Time is not a road.
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You're trying to load a pic that's too big. Open it on your desktop and resize it. If you have Microsoft, you should be able to choose "web large" or "web medium" size. That'll get you into the MTBR parameters for pic size.
 

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Time is not a road.
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Nice...I like the red accents, very *bling*.:thumbsup:

What's your opinion on the AM1? Ahimanic and I have been discussing this fork at length, just wondered what you thought about it...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks, i like to keep the bling factor somewhere in the middle.

the am1 is a great fork. it was an upgrade deal from marz (about $350 i think) after the stancions on my Z1 MCR pretty much wore down making a tight fit impossible. i've had it for about a season and a half and it's in bad need of on overhaul. it seems to have developed a bit of play in the first few cm of travel making it 'clunk' while riding. i have it set up at 6in and use the eta thingy to mash it down for long climbs. the only problem with this is that it looses nearly all it's travel (read suppleness) when doing this. the tst part dosen't seem to make that much of a difference unless you are totally locking it out.
 

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The Zoke is in need of rebuilding. You probably have junk floating around in there from disintegrated parts like top out bumpers and what not. If you send it back to Marzocchi be sure to check everything out before riding it. I sent in a Z1 and the stanchions were not tightened down when I got it back.

Nice looking ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks, i'll have my lbs rebuild it. i was thinking it was time to learn how to do this myself but i can't find any instructions (the manual has none)
 

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That's because they are difficult to do and I believe you need special tools to do it. That is one of the main reasons I have a Maverick DUC32. It is completely serviceable with a couple of tools.
 

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Time is not a road.
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The Marzocchi is easy to work on yourself, if you're so inclined. The only real hard part is that the to release the cartridges, you need a socket (I don't recall the size) that fits into the lowers. The opening is very narrow. I had to dremmel a socket to make it fit. This took about 10 min. All other tools are common.

Make sure you have the proper fork oil. Research this on the "Lets Talk About Shocks" forum. I also have info on my blog. Here's a helpful link, too:

http://www.peterverdonedesigns.com/bikesuspension.htm

Here's some shots of the components:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks

looks like a few tiny bits. i guess you need to order a rebuild kit to replace the seals and whatnot. where do you get these?
 

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PC, yes, the AM1 gets very dirty and the oil should be changed often. Zokes are known for this. Even if it's a new fork the oil will be very dirty after only a few hours of riding. It's pretty easy to just change the oil in the fork legs but more complicated if you want to take the fork apart. And the TST cartridge oil change is the most difficult. If you are interested I wrote up a quick step-by-step oil change instruction I can post here. As for

Chad, I lowered the psi down to 15 now!!! I like the feel much better than when it was at 16 or 17. It's more plush and supple. At 15 it got me just shy of 33% sag.

BTW, how did you get the ETA leg apart? I had trouble with taking the spring off. I thought about going to a lighter spring but Zoke CS told me there is only one spring for the AM1.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
wow 15 psi

you must be one of thoes skinny guys. i run mine around 50, but i am well into the clydesdale relm. not sure the sag i get but i'll check, you like ~30%? anyway post the step by step if'n you don't mind. i'd like to save the $40 on the rebuild if possible...i've another project in the works;)
 

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ahimanic said:
PC, yes, the AM1 gets very dirty and the oil should be changed often. Zokes are known for this. Even if it's a new fork the oil will be very dirty after only a few hours of riding. It's pretty easy to just change the oil in the fork legs but more complicated if you want to take the fork apart. And the TST cartridge oil change is the most difficult. If you are interested I wrote up a quick step-by-step oil change instruction I can post here. As for

Chad, I lowered the psi down to 15 now!!! I like the feel much better than when it was at 16 or 17. It's more plush and supple. At 15 it got me just shy of 33% sag.

BTW, how did you get the ETA leg apart? I had trouble with taking the spring off. I thought about going to a lighter spring but Zoke CS told me there is only one spring for the AM1.
Please post the oil change guide,and is changing the oil on zokes forks,similiar across
all of the models ? IE: Will your guide be helpful with this fork....

http://www.marzocchi.com/Template/d...#4#DQG#&Prgho\hdu&#@#5478&mCJ=&IDOggetto=3079

I have it on my Truth,until my RS Reba U-turn gets here.
 

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New seals may or may not be required. Check out the Enduro Seals website for excellent instructions on changing those.

http://www.enduroforkseals.com/

The small parts all came from the fork as it is now.

I didn't take apart the ETA cartridge. A stiffer spring would be nice, as I could lower the air pressure significantly. To that end, then, why wouldn't a Z1 spring work? The stanchions are the same size. BTW, I really hate how the spring rattles around inside the stanchion. Does yours have any covering on the spring to prevent this?

I don't have a guide to changing to oil, per se. Ahimanic posted about it on the Shocks forum a while back and got some good pointers. I used most of those. The procedure on the X-fly should be just about the same. My wife's fork (Atom 100) needs a seal change and I've been lazy about it. If I get it done soon, I'll post some info.
 

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ahimanic said:
PC, yes, the AM1 gets very dirty and the oil should be changed often. Zokes are known for this.
Zokes are known for this, but the new dampers (RC2 and TST) do not dirty the oil like in the old zokes. I've had two newer marzocchis (the 66 Light ETA and the AM1), and I have NOT found this to be true. The days of the stank oil are gone, and the oil actually keeps it's color now.

The oil in the TST damper stays especially clean.

The lube oil in the TST side stays really clean.

The oil in the ETA side is the worst, but still far better than when the forks used the HSCV carts.
 

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Ok, these are my notes on AM1 oil change. It's a compilation from various responses from the Shock Forum, many from SSINGA. I don't know if the instructions work for other Zoke models, I know the oil volume is not the same accross the board.

AM1 Oil Change Instruction ---- Marzochhi 661-257-6630 :D

Tools: 21mm socket, tapered thin-wall 12mm socket(optional), 2.5mm allen key Straw to measure oil level, cloth pin to hold straw on crown (height method). Measuring/oil pouring device in cc or ml such as a beaker or syringe.

7.5 weight Golden Spectro or Marzocchi full synthetic motorcycle fork oil,

Air valve adaptor and low pressure shock pump.

Disassembling

Remove wheel and disc brake caliper. Too risky to get oil on caliper.

Remove fork or leave it on the bike using the bike stand. Clean excess dirt off.

Take off top knobs of both legs with allen key, don't lose the detent pin and spring. O-ring goes under the ETA knob.

Let air out of the right leg.

It will be less messy to empty oil one leg at a time.

Left Leg (ETA)

Use 21mm socket to unscrew top cap, no need to take the cap off the rod for
oil change.

(Optional-If want to remove the cartridge)
Remove TAS knob below the leg, hold TAS cartridge on left leg from the bottom w/ 12mm wrench while loosening the top with 21mm socket. Oil will drain from bottom hole.

Turn fork upside down and dump out oil, then fully compress fork and drain again. Must fully drain to obtain correct oil level later.

Put some fresh oil in the leg, cycle the rod and stanchion to flush out remaining old oil

Once cleaned, thread top cap back on loosely to prevent oil from further running out

Right Leg (TST)

Remove detent pin and spring under the TST knob.

Use 21mm socket to unscrew top cap, no need to take the cap off the rod for oil change.

(Optional-If want to remove the cap)
Remove small C-clip on the top cap with screw driver, remove top cap.

Cycle the cartridge damper rod and stanchion to get trapped oil out.

Put some fresh oil in the leg, cycle the cartridges, to flush out remaining old oil

Re-assembly

Left Leg (ETA)

Fully compress legs before re-filling with oil.

Volume method: Use a measuring device and pour 140-145cc or 140-145ml into the left leg.

Height method: Spring must be removed. Fully compress stanchion and rod. Remove any zip tie on stanchion.

Fill with clean oil to 45mm from the top edge of the stanchion.

Use straw and clothe pin to measure oil height (hold straw with pin atop of leg to see how much oil goes into straw, plug straw with finger to not lose oil height mark or mark the proper oil height with permanent marker)

Cycle the rod and stanchion to get air bubbles out.

Re-insert the spring into the left leg.

Bolt the left leg top cap, doesn't have to be super tight. Place O-ring over the cap nut. Install ETA cap

Right Leg (TST)

Fill right leg with 40cc or 40ml of oil slowly so it runs past the TST cartridge bladder.

Cycle the rod and stanchion to get air bubbles out.

Bolt the right leg top cap, don't make it extremely tight.

Install detent spring and pin. Install TST cap, lining up the air hole with air valve when knob is in lockout position.

Air up the fork.

Trouble Shooting

If fork bottoms out there's not enough oil. If not getting full travel there's too much oil.

If the ETA is not working there is not enough oil.
 
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