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my church is the woods
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Just getting finished with my wintertime book. This one was highly recommended on another forum on MTBR, so I picked it up at my local library and it certainly didn't disappoint.

Here's the description off amazon:
Frank Lenz was a man driven by his passions. As an accomplished "wheelman" during the late 19th century, Lenz's dreams were dominated by the emerging sport of cycling and an intense desire to make a name for himself. In May of 1892, he attempted to fuse both by embarking on a quest to circumscribe the globe by bicycle. The journey had already been accomplished in tandem, but Lenz upped the ante--and raised eyebrows--by announcing he would ride his dangerous route alone. The Lost Cyclist is a riveting tale of tragedy, pride, and naivete that is both brilliantly told and meticulously researched. Opinions may differ as to whether Lenz was unaware or unconcerned by the inherent dangers he faced, but the story of his fateful journey belongs on the varied shelves of cycling enthusiasts, mystery fans, and nonfiction devotees alike. --Dave Callanan

Product Description
In the late 1880s, Frank Lenz of Pittsburgh, a renowned high-wheel racer and long-distance tourist, dreamed of cycling around the world. He finally got his chance by recasting himself as a champion of the downsized "safety-bicycle" with inflatable tires, the forerunner of the modern road bike that was about to become wildly popular. In the spring of 1892 he quit his accounting job and gamely set out west to cover twenty thousand miles over three continents as a correspondent for Outing magazine. Two years later, after having survived countless near disasters and unimaginable hardships, he approached Europe for the final leg.

He never made it. His mysterious disappearance in eastern Turkey sparked an international outcry and compelled Outing to send William Sachtleben, another larger-than-life cyclist, on Lenz's trail. Bringing to light a wealth of information, Herlihy's gripping narrative captures the soaring joys and constant dangers accompanying the bicycle adventurer in the days before paved roads and automobiles. This untold story culminates with Sachtleben's heroic effort to bring Lenz's accused murderers to justice, even as troubled Turkey teetered on the edge of collapse.

http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2010-09-11/news/bs-md-backstory-lost-cyclist-20100910_1_bicycle-lost-cyclist-overman-wheel

http://www.amazon.com/Lost-Cyclist-Adventurer-Mysterious-Disappearance/dp/0547195575/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1298041326&sr=8-1
 

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Good post

This book was amazing. Not only is it rich in cycling history, but it will also makes you feel like a wussy for taking an over night touring trip and thinking you're cool. Lenz had a huge sack.
 
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